Academy of Science - St. Louis
Home
|
About Us
|
Contact Us
 
Help Support the Academy of Science by Donating Online  
Infinite Menus, Copyright 2006, OpenCube Inc. All Rights Reserved. Contact Us
 
 
Newsletter

Click Here to Signup for the Academy Email List

Upcoming Events
August 2014
S M T W T F S
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 1 2 3 4 5 6
View All Events
Membership
Click Here to discover the beneifts of Academy membership
Find Us Online
Find us on Twitter   Find us on Tumblr   Find us on Pinterest   Find us on Facebook
Find us on Flickr   Find us on LinkedIn   Find us on YouTube

 
Academy Events // Event Archives (Past Events)
Past Academy of Science Events

2013 Events

Jan 23rd, 2013 (Wed)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL. Can accommodate 1 - 3 additional individual students ONLY. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED:
If you would like to select a group, or groups, of 20 – 25, 6th – 8th grade students (program can accommodate up to 100 students per day) to participate in Greening Your Future, please CLICK HERE to register, or call Science Careers program director, Rose Jansen at 314-537-7889.

RSVP for Greening Your Future by Friday, January 11, 2013. Currently space for 75 students.

PLEASE PROVIDE: the date/s you would like to attend, the name and address of your school, grade level/s to attend, number of students per grade level group, and the name and contact information (school, cell and home phone numbers and email addresses) of the teacher chaperone and school principal.

NO MONEY FOR SCHOOL FIELD TRIPS? LIMITED FUNDING MAY BE AVAILABLE for BUS TRANSPORTATION. Call 314-537-7889.

 
Jan 24th, 2013 (Thu)
On the Trail of Mis-Folded Proteins: Biochemistry and Neurodegenerative Disease
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Pioneering Science Series

Featured Speaker: Michael R. Nichols, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and BioChemistry, University of Missouri - St. Louis

Mis-folded proteins are a fascinating biochemical topic and the accumulation of these mis-folded protein aggregates looks to be the next big medical challenge. The phenomenon is an underlying cause of numerous neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s. As our lifespans increase and more people live to a ripe old age, the detrimental effect of protein aggregation is now much more appreciated and a tremendous number of biophysical, biomedical, and clinical studies have been conducted. Join biochemist Dr. Michael Nichols as he works to unravel the mystery behind of the biochemistry of protein aggregation and its relevance to human disease.

STUDENT OPPORTUNITES TO COMPETE FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS— two $250 scholarships for middle and high school students. Attend 3 seminars or panel discussions and write about your experience. Scholarship decisions announced in May 2013.

DRAWINGS FOR TWO FREE JUNIOR SCIENCE ACADEMY MEMBERSHIPS at each Pioneering Science Seminar. Junior Academy of Science-- Real-world science opportunities and field trips monthly— for students of all abilities in grades 6 - 12.

Location: Kirkwood High School Keating Theater
801 West Essex, Kirkwood, MO 63122

FREE parking in Kirkwood High School lots.

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

Pioneering Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Jan 29th, 2013 (Tue)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL. Can accommodate 1 - 3 additional individual students ONLY. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED:
If you would like to select a group, or groups, of 20 – 25, 6th – 8th grade students (program can accommodate up to 100 students per day) to participate in Greening Your Future, please CLICK HERE to register, or call Science Careers program director, Rose Jansen at 314-537-7889.

RSVP for Greening Your Future by Friday, January 11, 2013.

PLEASE PROVIDE: the date/s you would like to attend, the name and address of your school, grade level/s to attend, number of students per grade level group, and the name and contact information (school, cell and home phone numbers and email addresses) of the teacher chaperone and school principal.

NO MONEY FOR SCHOOL FIELD TRIPS? LIMITED FUNDING MAY BE AVAILABLE for BUS TRANSPORTATION. Call 314-537-7889.

 
Jan 31st, 2013 (Thu)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL. Can accommodate 1 - 3 additional individual students ONLY. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED:
If you would like to select a group, or groups, of 20 – 25, 6th – 8th grade students (program can accommodate up to 100 students per day) to participate in Greening Your Future, please CLICK HERE to register, or call Science Careers program director, Rose Jansen at 314-537-7889.

RSVP for Greening Your Future by Friday, January 11, 2013.

PLEASE PROVIDE: the date/s you would like to attend, the name and address of your school, grade level/s to attend, number of students per grade level group, and the name and contact information (school, cell and home phone numbers and email addresses) of the teacher chaperone and school principal.

NO MONEY FOR SCHOOL FIELD TRIPS? LIMITED FUNDING MAY BE AVAILABLE for BUS TRANSPORTATION. Call 314-537-7889.

 
Feb 5th, 2013 (Tue)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL. Can accommodate 1 - 3 additional individual students ONLY. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED:
If you would like to select a group, or groups, of 20 – 25, 6th – 8th grade students (program can accommodate up to 100 students per day) to participate in Greening Your Future, please CLICK HERE to register, or call Science Careers program director, Rose Jansen at 314-537-7889.

RSVP for Greening Your Future by Friday, January 11, 2013. Currently space for 75 students.

PLEASE PROVIDE: the date/s you would like to attend, the name and address of your school, grade level/s to attend, number of students per grade level group, and the name and contact information (school, cell and home phone numbers and email addresses) of the teacher chaperone and school principal.

NO MONEY FOR SCHOOL FIELD TRIPS? LIMITED FUNDING MAY BE AVAILABLE for BUS TRANSPORTATION. Call 314-537-7889.

 
Feb 5th, 2013 (Tue)
Science Behind Climate Change
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversation

The 2013 National Climate Assessment draft has been released for public review until April 12, 2013 at the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee website. This report, produced by more than 240 authors representing federal agencies, academic institutions, private industry and non-profit organizations, concludes that climate change, once considered an issue in the distant future, has moved firmly into the present.

Photo credit: Saint Louis Zoo

This panel will explain the science behind the report, some implications for our region and what is being done at the national and international level to address this issue.

Modern Climate Science

Featured Speaker: Donald Wuebbles, Harry E. Preble Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Illinois
The planet is warming. Climate model simulations reinforce scientific understanding that observed variations in global average surface temperature over the past century can only be explained through a combination of human and natural factors. The majority of the warming is due to emissions from fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas.

Current Climate Change Impacts on Agriculture
Featured Speaker: David Lobell, Assistant Professor in Environmental Earth System Science and Associate Director of the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University
Models that link yields of the four largest commodity crops to weather indicate that global corn and wheat production declined by 3.8 and 5.5%, respectively, relative to what would have occurred without climate trends. For soybeans and rice, winners and losers largely balanced out. Climate trends offset much of the yield increases that arose from technology advances in these crops.

The Social Ecology of Climate Change
Featured Speaker: Adrián Cerezo, Associate Director of Conservation Education Research, Saint Louis Zoo
Social ecology looks at climate change from two perspectives: first, how are human beliefs and practices related to climate change?; second, how are human communities affected by climate change? This presentation will discuss initiatives in research, policy and education intended to mitigate and adapt to climate change.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

Conservation Conversations are underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussmann.

 
Feb 6th, 2013 (Wed)
Junior Academy Students - Meet Ray Arvidson, PhD - Deputy Principal Investigator, Mars Exploration Rover Mission
Time:

Photo: Mars Rover--Opportunity

THE 5:30 EVENT IS FULL; HOWEVER, 7:30 PRESENTATION AT THE SAINT LOUIS IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

Junior Academy Students are invited to a unique round table discussion with Ray Arvidson, PhD.

Do you have your own questions about Opportunity’s exploration of Meridiani Planum on Mars? Are you wondering how they capture the data from the Mars? What's next in Mars exploration?

Dr. Arvidson will join us for pizza as he shares with you his perspective and answers your questions about the Mars Rover.

Dr. Arvidson is Deputy Principal Investigator, Mars Exploration Rover Mission; James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis and Director, Earth and Planetary Remote Sensing Laboratory (EPRSL), McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences; Fellow and 2006 Outstanding St. Louis Scientist Fellows Award recipient, The Academy of Science - St. Louis.

After the round table meeting, students are invited to head over to the Saint Louis Zoo for Dr. Arvidson's presentation. Parents need to provide transportation.

Students need to RSVP to attend.

Location: Washington University in St. Louis

Students will receive an e-mail with details as the event gets closer

 
Feb 6th, 2013 (Wed)
Exploring Ancient Martian Climates with the Opportunity and Curiosity Rovers
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Science Seminar Series

Featured Speaker: Raymond E. Arvidson, Ph.D., Deputy Principal Investigator, Mars Exploration Rover Mission; James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis and Director, Earth and Planetary Remote Sensing Laboratory (EPRSL), McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences; Fellow and 2006 Outstanding St. Louis Scientist Fellows Award recipient, The Academy of Science - St. Louis

Mars Exploration Rover Mission deputy principal investigator, Ray Arvidson, covers new results from Opportunity’s exploration of Meridiani Planum on Mars and focuses on evidence for ancient lakes and ground water systems.

Photo: Mars Rover--Curiosity

He shares recent results from Curiosity’s exploration of Gale crater and includes evidence for ancient river systems and lake deposits; and he folds these results into an evaluation of whether or not environmental conditions on early Mars were conducive to the formation and evolution of life.

Photo: Mars Rover--Opportunity

It's an out-of-this-world look at ancient martian climates and life on Mars you won't want to miss.

To be held at:
Saint Louis Zoo
Living World auditorium
(north side of Zoo).

Photo of Mount Sharp taken by Curiosity.

Parking is FREE in Zoo’s North Lot.
FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.
For more information call 314-533-8586 or email events@academyofsciencestl.org

Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

Science Seminar Series underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussman.

 
Feb 7th, 2013 (Thu)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL. Can accommodate 1 - 3 additional individual students ONLY. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED:
If you would like to select a group, or groups, of 20 – 25, 6th – 8th grade students (program can accommodate up to 100 students per day) to participate in Greening Your Future, please CLICK HERE to register, or call Science Careers program director, Rose Jansen at 314-537-7889.

RSVP for Greening Your Future by Friday, January 11, 2013. This date is FULL.

PLEASE PROVIDE: the date/s you would like to attend, the name and address of your school, grade level/s to attend, number of students per grade level group, and the name and contact information (school, cell and home phone numbers and email addresses) of the teacher chaperone and school principal.

NO MONEY FOR SCHOOL FIELD TRIPS? LIMITED FUNDING MAY BE AVAILABLE for BUS TRANSPORTATION. Call 314-537-7889.

 
Feb 13th, 2013 (Wed)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL. Can accommodate 1 - 3 additional individual students ONLY. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED:
If you would like to select a group, or groups, of 20 – 25, 6th – 8th grade students (program can accommodate up to 100 students per day) to participate in Greening Your Future, please CLICK HERE to register, or call Science Careers program director, Rose Jansen at 314-537-7889.

RSVP for Greening Your Future by Friday, January 11, 2013.

PLEASE PROVIDE: the date/s you would like to attend, the name and address of your school, grade level/s to attend, number of students per grade level group, and the name and contact information (school, cell and home phone numbers and email addresses) of the teacher chaperone and school principal.

NO MONEY FOR SCHOOL FIELD TRIPS? LIMITED FUNDING MAY BE AVAILABLE for BUS TRANSPORTATION. Call 314-537-7889.

 
Feb 13th, 2013 (Wed)
Earthquakes 101: Quake Histories and Hazards in the Central U.S.
Time: 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Phyllis Steckel, RG, Earthquake Insight LLC

Minimizing earthquake risk is a funny business. The payoff may not come for a long time -- and then it will be in terms of what did not happen. Don’t miss this Earthquakes 101 session. You’ll learn about regional earthquake vulnerabilities, risk, and history, including the infamous 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes where the river ran backwards. Hear about earthquakes and structures and the lessons learned in Haiti, New Zealand and Japan; and come away with an overview of needed actions and policies.

To be held at:
Kirkwood OASIS at the Kirkwood Community Center
111 South Geyer Road
Kirkwood, MO 63122

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.




On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Feb 18th, 2013 (Mon)
Teen Science Café: Zombies! A Lesson in Infectious Diseases and Disaster Preparedness
Time: 1:00 PM - 3:45 PM

THIS EVENT IS FULL

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM Zombie Cafe
2:30 PM - 3:45 PM Optional 3D virtual cadaver lab following the Cafe.


The Gateway Teen Science Café is a free, fun way for teens to explore science, technology, engineering and math. Teens have the opportunity to interact with science professionals in an informal and relaxed setting.

Costume Contest: Come dressed as a zombie and win fabulous prizes!

Junior Academy Student members, as well as, middle and high school students are invited to the February Teen Science Cafe: Zombies! A Lesson in Infectious Diseases and Disaster Preparedness.

Zombies....the people eating, mindless undead. Zombies used to just be monsters in horror films, but now are beginning to appear (with a slow limp or fast mad-dash) in science fiction. How, you ask? In some movies, people are transforming into zombies by coming into contact with some sort of virus or disease. In these cases, the "zombie apocalypse" is actually considered to be an infectious disease disaster.

Infectious disease disasters are large-scale events that involve an infectious disease, and can result in a lot of illness and death. Examples include a bioterrorism attack, an outbreak of a new disease, or a pandemic. Bioterrorism and pandemics can start without our knowledge, and can be difficult to identify until after a lot of people are ill.

Luckily, there are habits that you can make part of your daily life and preventative measures you can take to prepare for these disasters. While they may not completely ensure your survival during a zombie apocalypse (or other wide-spread infections), these tips may make the difference between life, illness, and even death. During this cafe, Dr. Terri Rebmann will discuss methods of disease prevention and disaster preparation during our very own zombie apocalypse.

An optional cadaver lab follows the Cafe event 2:30-3:45. Students will experience a 3-D cadaver lab, watching a demonstration on a screen.

This event is free and open to middle and high school students. THIS EVENT IS FULL.

 
Feb 20th, 2013 (Wed)
Interpersonal Violence: Using Neuroimaging and Genotyping to Understand PTSD Risk, Resilience, and Recovery
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Perspectives on Science & History Series

Featured Speaker: Steven E. Bruce, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, and Clinical Director, Center for Trauma Recovery, University of Missouri - St. Louis

Dr. Steven Bruce, Director of UMSL's Center for Trauma Recovery, talks about recent findings on the use of leading edge techniques such as neuroimaging and genotyping to examine both the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and functional changes in the brain after successful cognitive behavioral treatment.

Presented in conjunction with the History Museum traveling exhibition The Doll Project, a multimedia photographic exhibit featuring images of makeshift monuments erected throughout the St. Louis area for those who have fallen victim to a crime or untimely and tragic circumstances. The Doll Project opens at the Museum on January 19, 2013.

To be held at:
Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

Registration not required. FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome. Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in partnership with:

 
Feb 22nd, 2013 (Fri)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL. Can accommodate 1 - 3 additional individual students ONLY. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED:
If you would like to select a group, or groups, of 20 – 25, 6th – 8th grade students (program can accommodate up to 100 students per day) to participate in Greening Your Future, please CLICK HERE to register, or call Science Careers program director, Rose Jansen at 314-537-7889.

RSVP for Greening Your Future by Friday, January 11, 2013. This date is FULL.

PLEASE PROVIDE: the date/s you would like to attend, the name and address of your school, grade level/s to attend, number of students per grade level group, and the name and contact information (school, cell and home phone numbers and email addresses) of the teacher chaperone and school principal.

NO MONEY FOR SCHOOL FIELD TRIPS? LIMITED FUNDING MAY BE AVAILABLE for BUS TRANSPORTATION. Call 314-537-7889.

 
Feb 26th, 2013 (Tue)
Pig Heart Dissection Lab
Time: 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

REGISTRATION IS CLOSED.

Junior Academy student members are invited to join Teen Science Cafe Youth Leadership Team members for a Pig Heart Dissection lab. To find out more about joining a Science Care Youth Leadership Team, CLICK HERE.

Join us for a special opportunity to learn more about anatomy with the AIMS (Adventures in Medicine and Science) Program, a component of Practical Anatomy and Surgical Education in St. Louis University's School of Medicine - Center for Anatomic Science and Education.

IMPORTANT: Lab attire required - no open toe shoes or sandals are permitted in the laboratory.

Open to Junior Academy members and Teen Science Cafe Youth Leadership Team members only.

A signed release form is required from all dissection lab participants. This form must be signed by a parent or legal guardian. Please download, print, fill out the Release Form (DOWNLOAD HERE) and bring your signed copy with you to the Dissection or you will not be allowed to participate.

 
Feb 27th, 2013 (Wed)
Polar Bear Conservation
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Conservation Conversation

Featured Speaker: Steve Bircher, Curator of Mammals/Carnivores, Saint Louis Zoo

Steve Bircher, Saint Louis Zoo curator of mammals/carnivores, will present an overview of polar bears and the need for their conservation. Bircher serves as Director of the WildCare Institute Center for Conservation of Large Carnivores in Africa and as a member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Polar Bear Species Survival Plan Management Committee, which oversees the captive population of polar bears in North America.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

Conservation Conversations are underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussmann.

 
Feb 28th, 2013 (Thu)
Autopsy: Forensic Pathology Investigates
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Pioneering Science Series

Featured Speaker: E. Stephen Bolesta, M.D., Director of Outreach, Department of Pathology, Saint Louis University; and Medical Lab Director, Belleville Memorial Hospital

In the morgue and the autopsy room, it's the forensic pathologist who carries the weight of conversation; the company is less than talkative. In mostly quiet soliloquies, forensic scientists pursue last chapter stories the dead can no longer tell on their own.

Medical lab director and forensic pathologist Dr. E. Stephan Bolesta provides a fascinating look at the science that traces the last chapter trajectories of lives lived and that gives voice to the end-of-life stories of the unidentified, the sufferers of unexplained disease, and the victims of foul play. He covers the steps involved in establishing identity and determining the causes, manner, mechanisms and timing of death, and reviews the basics of traumatic injuries in this vivid portrayal of what it means to be a forensic pathologist.

STUDENT OPPORTUNITES TO COMPETE FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS— two $250 scholarships for middle and high school students. Attend 3 seminars or panel discussions and write about your experience. Scholarship decisions announced in May 2013.

DRAWINGS FOR TWO FREE JUNIOR SCIENCE ACADEMY MEMBERSHIPS at each Pioneering Science Seminar. Junior Academy of Science-- Real-world science opportunities and field trips monthly— for students of all abilities in grades 6 - 12.

Location: Kirkwood High School Keating Theater
801 West Essex, Kirkwood, MO 63122

FREE parking in Kirkwood High School lots.

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

Pioneering Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Mar 1st, 2013 (Fri)
Jurassic Park: Fact or Fiction?
Time: 8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Special Partnership Presentations

Featured Speaker: Michael Morales, Ph.D., Geology Museum Director and Associate Professor: Paleontology, General Earth Science, Emporia State University

Did Dilaphosaurus really spit venom or was Velociraptor really a six foot tall, highly intelligent predator? Explore the world of dinosaurs and what we really know about the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park with Dr. Michael Morales, Geology Museum Director at Emporia State University.

To be held at:
Saint Louis Science Center Exploradome Exhibit Hall
5050 Oakland Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110
Parking is FREE in the Science Center Lot.

FREE & OPEN to ALL.

SPACE is LIMITED. Registration required. For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

Jurassic Park: Fact or Fiction? is a partnership presentation of:

 
Mar 4th, 2013 (Mon)
Painted Dog Conservation: The Trials and Tribulations of Conserving an Endangered Predator in a Human-Dominated Landscape
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Greg Rasmussen, Ph.D. Research Director, Painted Dog Conservation

Greg Rasmussen grew up in Zimbabwe where he developed a strong affinity for wildlife and spent his school holidays in the laboratories of the Natural History Museum. He has worked with the painted dog exclusively for 24 years and, consequently, is one of the top authorities on painted dogs.

Photo credit: Painted Dog Conservation

Painted Dog Conservation (PDC) is a leading model for community-based predator conservation. By combining the most advanced modern technology with traditional knowledge of local communities, PDC has experienced great success – Zimbabwe's wild dog population has increased from 400 to 700 individuals since the project's inception. PDC's model also brings direct benefit to local people with increased employment and unparalleled education opportunities.

This Conservation Conversation will discuss the unique ecology of the painted dog and how studying the painted dog in a landscape dominated by negative attitudes and misconceptions is leading to changing attitudes of ranchers and the general public.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

Conservation Conversations are underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussmann.

 
Mar 6th, 2013 (Wed)
To the Arctic: Bringing a Remote Yet Vibrant Land to Life
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Science Seminar Series

--lecture and book signing, official companion book to the IMAX film, To The Arctic
Special thanks to Journey Through the Arctic sponsor, the Alaska Wilderness League.


Featured Speaker: Florian Schulz, award-winning nature photographer and author

In every season of the year, the Arctic pulses with life. Caribou migrate to coastal plains in spring to give birth. In summer, birds from around the world float on arctic lakes and wetlands. As summer turns to winter, polar bears venture onto the growing ice to feed. Even through the long winter, coral reefs thrive below the ice. Award-winning nature photographer, Florian Schulz, presents stunning photographs and video showcasing the variety of arctic life that thrive throughout the seasons of the year.

From the oddly captivating shapes of musk oxen to some of the most extraordinary images ever taken in the wild of a mother polar bear and her two young cubs, audiences thrill to Florian's unforgettable photographs. His presentations are rich in visual imagery and personal storytelling, expertly mixed with sounds of the Arctic and music. In this powerful and inspirational multi-media show, Florian blends beauty and artistry with a conservation message that focuses on what we can do to protect our wild habitats.

To be held at: Saint Louis Zoo Living World auditorium (north side of Zoo)

Parking is FREE in Zoo’s North Lot.
FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.
For more information call 314-533-8586 or email events@academyofsciencestl.org

Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

 
Mar 8th, 2013 (Fri)
Secrets of Her Success
Time: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Special Partnership Presentations

A panel of four diverse, well-established female scientists from industry, academia, business, and science policy will describe their experiences and answer questions from the audience. A reception will follow for conversations with the panelists and additional networking.

Featured Speakers:

Barbara Schaal, PhD, Distinguished Professor, Vice President of the National Academy of Sciences, PCAST, Dean of the Faculty of Arts Sciences

Barbara Anna Schaal is a dean and professor at Washington University in St. Louis and vice president of the National Academy of Sciences. She is also an Academy of Science - St. Louis fellow.

Tammie Benzinger, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Director of the Knight ADRC Research Imaging (KARI) Program

Tammie Benzinger is an assistant professor of radiology in the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. She is a board-certified neuroradiologist with extensive experience in advanced neuroimaging techniques and analysis.

Susan Bragg, PhD, Founder and Chief Technology Officer, Prozess Technologies

Susan Bragg is a recognized global leader and much requested speaker in process analytical technology (PAT). Susan has combined her skills as a scientist and product innovator by founding several companies.

Anneliese Schaefer, PhD, JD, Research Associate Professor of Neurology, Executive Director of the Hope Center for Neurological Disorders

Dr. Schaefer is the Executive Director of the Hope Center for Neurological Disorders. The Hope Center promotes collaborative research on shared mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and repair, providing funding, core facilities, and opportunities for investigators to share their unpublished findings and learn the latest in translational research both inside and outside of Washington University.

Photo credit: Association for Women in Science, St. Louis

To be held at:
Erlanger Auditorium
McDonnell Science Building
Washington University in St. Louis
4565 McKinley Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110
Directions and parking information CLICK HERE.

Registration required. COST: $10 for AWIS members and $15 for non-members. SPACE is LIMITED. OPEN to ALL. For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE.

Secrets of Her Success is a partnership presentation of:

 
Mar 13th, 2013 (Wed)
John James Audubon and the Art of Ornithology
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Standing room only.


Art & Science Series

Featured Speaker: Julie Dunn-Morton, Ph.D., Curator of Fine Art Collections, St. Louis Mercantile Library and Coordinator of Exhibits and Collections, University of Missouri - St. Louis

John James Audubon’s Birds of America is a perfect blending of fine art and science. After spending years in the American wilderness painting every species he could find, Audubon took his paintings to Edinburgh in 1826 – when the city was at the height of the Scottish Enlightenment – and partnered with a leading printer of scientific texts to produce the 435 monumental plates. This presentation will explore the artist’s fascination with the natural world as well as the significance of William H. Lizars, the printer, and the impact of the Enlightenment’s emphasis on observations of the natural world on the success of this artistic and scientific masterpiece.

Presented in conjunction with the Craft Alliance in Grand Center’s Exhibition - Ann Coddington Rast: flock. For more on flock, visit http://www.craftalliance.org/exhibitions/currentgc.htm

Craft Alliance at Grand Center
501 North Grand Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63103

Directions and Parking at http://www.craftalliance.org/contact.htm

FREE and OPEN to ALL.

Seating is limited. Registration required. To register, CLICK HERE or call 314-533-8586.

Photos courtesy of the St. Louis Mercantile Library.

 
Mar 18th, 2013 (Mon)
Cognitive Illusions: Understanding the Tricks our Minds Can Play
Time: 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: John F. Nestojko, Ph.D., Post-Doctoral Research Associate, Department of Psychology Memory Lab, Washington University in St. Louiss

Our cognitive systems work quite well but sometimes lead us astray with illusions and falsehoods of memory. Join Washington University psychology professor, Dr. Henry Roediger, for an in-depth look at why we suffer illusions of perceiving, remembering and thinking. Along the way, he provides tips for improving cognitive processes, particularly memory.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63105

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.




On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Mar 19th, 2013 (Tue)
Climate Change: A Heated Discussion
Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speakers: Brian Ettling, Naturalist Park Ranger, National Park Service; and Jim Jordan, Senior Coordinator Continuing Education, University of Missouri – St. Louis; Director of Educational Outreach, Show-Me-Solar

Scientists have linked extreme weather events occurring over the past few years to climate change. Join us for an in-depth look at the politics, societal impact, scientific evidence and models, and the view from other countries, of our changing climate.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63105

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $15 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.


A joint program of the University of Missouri – St. Louis Division of Continuing Education and The Academy of Science – St. Louis

A partnership presentation of:

 
Mar 19th, 2013 (Tue)
Challenging Times for Conservation in Madagascar
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Lemur, Madagascar
Photo (c) Saint Louis Zoo

Featured Speaker: Ingrid Porton, Curator of Primates, Saint Louis Zoo

In 1991 Saint Louis Zoo primate curator, Ingrid Porton, led a survey of ruffed lemurs in the Betampona Natural Reserve for the Madagascar Fauna and Flora Group (MFG); and in 2004, she became the Group's Vice-Chair.

The Madagascar Fauna and Flora Group has taken a holistic approach to addressing conservation issues by building an integrated and multidisciplinary program that focuses on four strategies: research, education, capacity building and conservation action. Since a January 2009 coup that ousted the democratically elected President, Madagascar has been ruled by an interim President. The political turmoil, along with the withdrawal of financial aid by the U.S. and European countries, increased lawlessness, poverty and hunger. Illegal logging and hunting is further threatening the survival of Madagascar’s already endangered species. Despite these, and additional challenges, the MFG has continued to run its programs and protect Betampona’s biodiversity.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

 
Mar 21st, 2013 (Thu)
Teen Science Cafe: Bionics: A Lesson in Biomechanics and Brain-Computer Interfaces
Time: 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

REGISTRATION IS CLOSED.

The Gateway Teen Science Café is a free, fun way for teens to explore science, technology, engineering and math. Teens have the opportunity to interact with science professionals in an informal and relaxed setting.

Junior Academy Student members, as well as, middle and high school students are invited to the March Teen Science Cafe: Bionics: A Lesson in Biomechanics and Brain-Computer Interfaces.

Imagine that you lost your ability to use your hand or legs. Perhaps you even lost the limb itself. What would you do? How would you adapt? What challenges would you face on a daily basis? You may know one or more people who are affected by similar circumstances. Even famous public figures like physicist Stephen Hawking or past U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt have experienced the effects of paralysis and nerve atrophy.

Now imagine a future where missing or non-working body parts could be replaced or made useable with robotic prosthetic devices. These devices could closely simulate the human anatomy in beautiful detail, perhaps eventually even to the point that they looked quite similar. Robotic legs could allow those who are unable to walk to do so; mechanical hands could let a person pick up objects, draw, cook, clean, and more! Better yet, imagine that these devices plugged directly into your nervous system, allowing you to control them with your brain (much like a regular limb) and even to enjoy the sensation of touch. Wouldn't that be great?!

Fortunately, this dream is currently being pursued by biomedical researchers, and real progress is being made! Join us as we explore this progress and the world of robotic prosthetic devices through a brain-computer interface with Dr. Dan Moran of Washington University in a cafe that we call Bionics!

Dr. Dan Moran is an associate professor in biomedical engineering at Washington University with a secondary appointments in Neurobiology and Physical Therapy at the School of Medicine. His primary research involves voluntary motor control and the control signals necessary to restore movement in paralyzed individuals through implantable devices. Dr. Moran's work draws from his background in electrical engineering, movement biomechanics, and systems neurophysiology.

This event is free and open to middle and high school students. Registration is required. To register, CLICK HERE or call 314-533-8586.

Please CLICK HERE to download a permission form for the event.

Washington University Campus (on-campus location to be announced)

Photo credit: Washington University Moran Lab.

 
Apr 2nd, 2013 (Tue)
Mississippi River Confluence: More than Eagles
Time: 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Accepting wait-listed only at this time.

On Science Series

-small passenger bus driving tour

Tour Guides: James H. Wilson, Ph.D., E. Desmond Lee Endowed Professor in Experiential and Family Education, College of Education, University of Missouri – St. Louis and Jim Jordan, Senior Coordinator Continuing Education, University of Missouri – St. Louis

Journey to the greatest confluence of big rivers in North America— the Illinois, Mississippi, and Missouri Rivers. Visit Two Rivers National Wildlife Refuge, Riverlands Army Corps of Engineers, and Pierre Marquette State Park and explore the migratory birds that depend on the bottomlands the three rivers have created. See ducks, geese, pelicans, herons and other shore birds in addition to nesting eagles and join in a discussion of current management practices. Learn about the fisheries, geology, and cultural history that shaped this region.

Photo credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Midwest Region

Stop for lunch in historic river town, Grafton, IL. NOTE: lunch is on your own and (not included in price).

Registration required. COST: $30 per person (Does not include lunch). SPACE is LIMITED. OPEN to ALL. For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

A joint program of the University of Missouri – St. Louis Division of Continuing Education and The Academy of Science – St. Louis

A partnership presentation of:

 
Apr 3rd, 2013 (Wed)
Beeologics: Monsanto's Commitment to Honey Bee Health
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Science Seminar Series

Featured Speaker: Gerald Hayes, Ph.D., Beeologics Commercial Lead, Monsanto Company; founding member of the Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) Working Group; science advisor for Project Apis Mellifera

Under siege from a variety of invasive and novel pests, parasites and diseases, honey bee health in general is simply not good. We benefit personally from a huge variety of fruits, nuts, vegetables and berries that honey bees are directly responsible for providing to us from their pollination activities. A large section of our environment benefits from these same pollination activities that allow plants to reproduce with seeds and nuts which leads to another generation of these valuable wild plants, which then preserves both bio-diversity and watershed positive impacts. And these same seeds and nuts feed a variety of wildlife and maintain the ecosystem balance. Learn more about how honey bee health is a priority for St. Louis-based Monsanto from Beeologics Bee Health Lead, Jerry Hayes.

To be held at: Saint Louis Zoo Living World auditorium (north side of Zoo)

Parking is FREE in Zoo’s North Lot.
FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.
For more information call 314-533-8586 or email events@academyofsciencestl.org

Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

 
Apr 5th, 2013 (Fri)
History of the St. Louis Fur Trade
Time: 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM

On Science Series

Featured Speakers: Fred Fausz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History, University of Missouri – St. Louis; and Jim Jordan, French explorer and fur trader

Learn about the international fur trade from the founding of St. Louis to the end of the 20th century and see a number of representative artifacts in this fascinating look at the history of the Fur Trade in St. Louis. Join French explorers Jacques and Fred on a journey back to the 1760s through the Mississippi Valley during the fur trade’s earliest days through to the fur industry that persisted in St. Louis into the 1960s. Did you know the 20th century actually saw a second fur boom in St. Louis?

To be held at:
University of Missouri - St. Louis
J. C. Penny Conference Center
One University Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63121

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.


A joint program of the University of Missouri – St. Louis Division of Continuing Education and The Academy of Science – St. Louis

A partnership presentation of:

 
Apr 6th, 2013 (Sat)
Beetlejuice at the Hi-Pointe, a Fundraiser for Teen Programs
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Help us raise funds for the Academy's teen programs! We impact many students throughout the region with our uniquely interactive and hands-on science experiences with STEM professionals for teens, including Junior Academy of Science, Teen Science Cafes and Science Career Explorations. We need your help to keep up this good work connecting teens to our region's scientists and STEM professionals!

Join us on Saturday, April 6 for a showing of Beetlejuice (PG). Doors open at 10 a.m. and the show begins at 10:30 a.m.

Beetlejuice is a 1988 comedy/horror film directed by Tim Burton. The plot revolves around a recently deceased young couple who become ghosts haunting their former home and an obnoxious, devious "bio-exorcist" named Betelgeuse from the underworld who tries to scare away the new inhabitants permanently.

Tickets are $5 per person at the door.

Location: 1005 McCausland Ave, St Louis, MO
Parking: Limited parking will be available in the lot two doors south of the yoga studio on McCausland. The bank will be open so please be sure not to park in that lot.
For more information on the location and parking, CLICK HERE.

Please take the time to register in advance. To register, CLICK HERE or call 314-533-8586.

This event is sponsored by: The Hi-Pointe Theatre

 
Apr 8th, 2013 (Mon)
Popular Science in Western Culture: From the “Kosmos” of Alexander von Humboldt to the “Cosmos” of Carl Sagan
Time: 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Kevin Fernlund, Ph.D., Professor of History, University of Missouri – St. Louis

Learn about the popular science of Prussian geographer, naturalist and explorer, Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and American cosmologist, Carl Sagan (1936-1996) and the important role “popular science” has played in shaping Western democracy and culture.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63105

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.




On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Apr 10th, 2013 (Wed)
Stardust in the Laboratory!
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Speaker: Thomas J. Bernatowicz, Ph.D. Washington University in St. Louis

About 4.6 billion years ago the Solar System condensed from an interstellar cloud infused with dust and gas from winds emanating from dying stars. In the very hot and harsh environment that prevailed during the early epochs of the condensation most of these dust grains were destroyed, but some survived and were preserved in the matrix of primitive meteorites, which occasionally fall to the Earth.

In this presentation we will show how stardust grains in meteorites can be identified in the laboratory using nanoscale mass spectrometry and electron microscopy, and how the results of such studies lead to important new insights about the creation of the elements by stars and supernovae. These laboratory findings significantly complement the studies of these processes carried out with ground-based and space-borne astronomical telescopes.

Free and open to Junior Academy of Science members, Teen Cafe members and the general public

Registration is not required. Middle and High School Students welcome. Students need to attend with a parent. Note: This lecture is offered through Washington University and will not be supervised.

To be held at:
Washington University in St. Louis
Department of Physics
Steinberg Hall
Room 105 (the Auditorium)

 
Apr 11th, 2013 (Thu)
Dogs from Wolves: What We’re Learning from Science About the Evolution of Dogs and What It Means to Us
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Karla Armbruster, Ph.D., Professor of English and Chair, Sustainability Studies Committee, Webster University

Learn more about “man’s best friend” and the recent anthropological and genetic research on when, where, and how the dog evolved. Take a look at how various writers, including Jack London, Old Yeller author Fred Gipson, and Donald McCaig have used the idea of the dog’s wild ancestors to support sometimes competing visions of the relationship between wild nature and human culture in this intriguing talk on Dogs with Professor Karla Armbruster.

To be held at:
OASIS in Forest Park, Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor’s Center
5595 Grand Drive in Forest Park
St. Louis, MO 63112

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.



On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Apr 11th, 2013 (Thu)
Organ Printing: Building Tissues and Body Parts in the Future
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Special Partnership Presentations

EVENT CANCELED. Please check back as we hope to reschedule in fall.

Featured Speaker: Gabor Forgacs, Ph.D., George H Vineyard Professor of Theoretical Physics, University of Missouri - Columbia

Organ printing is a medical technology of the future. It will one day enable doctors to help patients in need of replacement organs or tissues by building new organs or tissues using the patients' own cells. Join Dr. Forgacs, a leading researcher and pioneer in this field, in a discussion of the progress of this cutting-edge science.

Organ Printing: Building Tissues and Body Parts in the Future is a partnership presentation of:

 
Apr 15th, 2013 (Mon)
Teen Science Cafe: Emergency Room Medicine
Time: 5:00 PM - 7:30 PM

The Gateway Teen Science Café is a free, fun way for teens to explore science, technology, engineering and math. Teens have the opportunity to interact with science professionals in an informal and relaxed setting.

Junior Academy Student members, as well as, middle and high school students are invited to the April Teen Science Cafe: Emergency Room Medicine.

Imagine the emergency room of the future. What life-saving technologies will it have? What advances will increase the efficiency of doctors, nurses, and technicians? Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine and Director of Simulation Studies for Emergency Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine, Dr. Jason Wagner, takes us on a fascinating trip to visit the future of Emergency Medicine.

This event is free and open to middle and high school students. Registration is required. To register, CLICK HERE or call 314-533-8586.

Please CLICK HERE to download a permission form for the event.

Location: Webster Groves Public Library Meeting Room
301 E Lockwood Ave, St Louis, MO 63119
Doors open at 5 p.m. Cafe begins at 5:30 p.m.

 
Apr 16th, 2013 (Tue)
Nature Nurtures Nature: Connecting Children to Nature in Childcare Centers
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Nature Nurtures Nature: The Relation Between Biophilic Design Elements in Childcare Centers and the Developmental Outcomes of Three Year Old Children Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Adrian Cerezo, Associate Director, Conservation Education Research, Saint Louis Zoo

Does contact with nature make young children smarter, healthier and more well-adjusted and creative? By integrating concepts and methods from the fields of early child development (ECD) and social ecology, Cerezo will present empirical evidence demonstrating the associations between biophilic design features (the human natural elements of the built environment) of child care centers and early childhood development outcomes. Implications for program design, architectural design and policymaking will be discussed.

Photo credit: Saint Louis Zoo

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

 
Apr 18th, 2013 (Thu)
Without Consent: Contextualizing Cold War Army Tests in the City of St. Louis, 1953-1965
Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Perspectives on Science & History Series

Featured Speaker: Lisa Martino-Taylor, Ph.D., Sociology Instructor, Saint Louis Community College, Meramec Campus

Between 1953 and 1965, the U.S. Army conducted covert aerosol tests in predominantly minority areas in the city of St. Louis without consent, using a cover story of protecting the city from aerial attack. According to Army documents, they purposely targeted a "densely populated slum area" in the city. Sociologist, Lisa Martino-Taylor, Ph.D., sheds light on this secret Cold War program within the broader context of secret military tests, including covert radiological tests on human subjects without consent.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Question Bridge: Black Males on display at the Missouri History Museum from February 23 through June 30, 2013.

To be held at:
Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

Registration not required. FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome. Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in partnership with:

 
Apr 23rd, 2013 (Tue)
The Land of Gold and Cinnamon: Odyssey of the Amazon
Time: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

EVENT FULL

Join us at this FUN and FREE event and discover the inspiring Children’s Eternal Rainforest. Enjoy light refreshments, hear from some of the world’s greatest biologists and help protect this special rainforest by placing a bid on some great silent auction items (including some fabulous vacations!).

The fascinating history of the legendary Amazon rainforest, its role among the rainforests of the Americas, the impact these habitats have on all of us, and the solutions presented by conservation initiatives like the inspiring Children’s Eternal Rainforest in Costa Rica. With an Introduction by Dr. Peter H. Raven.

Admission:

General Admission is FREE and includes food, drink and live "animal entertainment.

Space is limited. Advance registration is required. FREE and OPEN to ALL.
Details and registration at: http://friendsoftherainforest.org/wild/

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot. Dress is business casual.

Keynote speaker: Thomas E. Lovejoy, Ph.D.
Conservation biologist Dr. Thomas E. Lovejoy is the creator of PBS’ Nature series, the winner of the 2012 Blue Planet Prize, and the originator of the innovative debt-for-nature-swap. Dr. Lovejoy will speak at the event on current conservation issues, his experiences in the Amazon and the role of rainforests throughout the Americas.

Introduction by: Peter Raven, Ph.D.
Beloved father of conservation and biodiversity in St. Louis, President Emeritus of the Missouri Botanical Garden Dr. Peter H. Raven has been designated by TIME Magazine as a “Hero of the Planet.” Well known for his ability to provide compelling and accessible information about the state of our world today, he is also a board member of Friends of the Children’s Eternal Rainforest.

A partnership presentation and program of:

 
Apr 24th, 2013 (Wed)

For award information, visit our Outstanding St. Louis Scientists Awards page.

2013 Outstanding St. Louis Scientists Awards Dinner & Celebration
Time: 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM



19th Outstanding St. Louis Scientists Awards Dinner
Wednesday, April 24, 2013
Starlight Ballroom – Chase Park Plaza Hotel
Saint Louis, Missouri

complimentary valet parking
complimentary garage parking off Maryland Avenue

Reception: 5:30 p.m.   -   Dinner: 7 p.m.   -   Presentation: 8 p.m.
business attire

Don't miss this exceptional evening, reserve your seat today!
Reservation Deadline: Thursday, April 18, 2013

To reserve individual tickets or a table, please contact Lynn Cook
(lcook@academyofsciencestl.org or 314.289.1402)
Download the Invitation.

Download and fill out the Secure On-Line RSVP

Secure RSVP.

 
Apr 30th, 2013 (Tue)
The Hellbender – A Journey in Saving a Declining Ozark Salamander
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Jeff Briggler, Ph.D., Herpetologist, Missouri Department of Conservation

Hellbenders are large, aquatic salamanders inhabiting cool, highly oxygenated, fast-flowing streams in the Ozark Highlands. Historically, hellbenders were abundant in these Ozark streams, but populations have experienced severe declines. Over the past decade, individuals from Federal and State agencies, academia, zoos, non-governmental organizations, and Missouri’s citizens have banded together to save this unique Ozark salamander. An overview of some recovery efforts will be briefly discussed from abnormalities and diseases to assessing water quality and sperm, as well as captive propagation efforts underway. Learn more about the amazing life history of the hellbender and other noteworthy highlights in a journey to save this species from extinction.

Photo credit: Missouri Department of Conservation

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

 
May 3rd, 2013 (Fri)
The Art of Science
Time: 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM

The 5th Annual Novus Art Walk.

Novus is proud to celebrate 20 years of Science in Missouri Research Park. Please join in for a fun-filled evening of art, live music, wine and hors d'oeuvres! Over 30 local visual and performing artists and arts organizations will be onsite to exhibit and sell their amazing work. Enjoy live demonstrations of dancing, acting, print-making, painting and more - including some amazing artwork that captures "The Art of Science."

Free and open to all. Registration not required. Raffles and Prizes.

To be held at:
Novus Headquarters, 20 Research Park Drive, St. Charles, MO 63304

For further information contact Adrienne Todd at adrienne.todd@novusint.com

 
May 21st, 2013 (Tue) -- May 22nd, 2013 (Wed)
The Sustainable Table: Food for the Global and Local Economy
Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

On Science Series

Registration is closed.

--- Two-Day Workshop, an Exploring Science & Society partnership of The Academy of Science – St. Louis, OASIS, and the University of Missouri – St. Louis

Tour Guide: Jim Jordan, Senior Coordinator Continuing Education, University of Missouri – St. Louis

Sustainable Agriculture conjures up different meanings. The way food is produced has changed in the last century. Advancements in technologies have increased production, but chemical inputs have been implicated in human and environmental health issues. Learn about different perspectives on sustainable agriculture in this comprehensive two-day workshop on The Sustainable Table. Tour Earth Dance Organic Farms on day one and Monsanto’s Agronomics and Breeding Facility on day two. Everyone has a bite in the future of how food is grown.

Photo credit: Earth Dance Organic Farms

TUESDAY, MAY 21, 2013
9 AM – 10 AM Morning Session at UMSL
10 AM – Noon Earth Dance Organic Farms Tour

University of Missouri - St. Louis
J. C. Penney Conference Center
One University Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63121

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2013
9 AM – Noon Monsanto Agronomics and Breeding Facility Tour

Monsanto Creve Coeur Headquarters
800 North Lindbergh Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63167

Registration is required and is for both days. COST: $35 per person (Does not include lunch). SPACE is LIMITED. OPEN to ALL. For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

A joint program of the University of Missouri – St. Louis Division of Continuing Education and The Academy of Science – St. Louis

A partnership presentation of:

 
Jun 9th, 2013 (Sun)
Science of the Circus
Time: 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

You never know what you'll see at the circus - fire, magic, juggling and so much more. Science of the Circus explains the science behind many of your favorite circus acts. Find out the neuroscience behind magic or how a performer can eat fire as we explore this exciting world before a Sunday matinee of St. Louis’ very own Circus Flora.


Anyone attending Science of the Circus can purchase tickets to the 1 pm matinee performance on June 9 and receive a group rate by contacting the Circus Flora Box Office: 314.531.4600. Be sure to mention “Science of Circus" when booking your tickets. Box Office hours are 10:30 am – 5 pm.

For more information about Circus Flora visit their website: www.circusflora.org.

If you have any questions, please call 314.533.8586.

Free and open to all. Registration not required.

To be held at:
Centene Center for the Arts
Fourth Floor
3547 Olive St
St. Louis, MO 63103

Free parking is available on the streets.

A partnership presentation of:

 
Jun 13th, 2013 (Thu)
Mysterious Fossils of the Missouri Ozarks
Time: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Bruce Stinchcomb, Ph.D., paleontologist, retired Professor of Geology, St. Louis Community College - Florissant Valley, and author of, World’s Oldest Fossils, Paleozoic Fossils and More Paleozoic Fossils

Lecture and book signing

Within the Missouri Ozarks are extensive fossil-containing exposures of rock strata formed during the Cambrian Period of geologic time and deposited in shallow seas from 500 – 535 million years ago. This geologic era was a time of a great radiation of life with some life forms being obvious ancestors to those living today, while others appear to be totally extinct. Paleontologist and author Bruce Stinchcomb talks about these disappearing life forms represented by peculiar and even mysterious fossils found in the Cambrian of the Missouri Ozarks.

To be held at:
Center of Clayton OASIS
50 Gay Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63105

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited. Middle and high school students welcome.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.


A partnership presentation of:

 
Jun 18th, 2013 (Tue)
Football Concussions and Battlefield Brain Injuries: What We Think We Know and What We Don’t Know About Long-Term Impact
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Perspectives on Science & History Series

Featured Speaker: David L Brody, M.D. Ph.D., Associate Professor of Neurology, Washington University; Site Director, National Football League Neurological Care Program and Washington University Concussion Clinic

Recently, reports of delayed deterioration after sports concussions and extensive news coverage on the effects of blast-related injuries in U.S. service members from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have brought the topic of traumatic brain injury into sharp focus. NFL Neurological Care Program and Washington University Concussion Clinic Director, Dr. David Brody, talks about what is really known about these injuries, and introduces several medical mysteries that remain unsolved in this important look at both sports and war-related traumatic brain injuries.

Photo credit: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Presented in conjunction with traveling exhibition Gridiron Glory: The Best of the Pro Football Hall of Fame on display at the Museum from May 25 – September 3, 2013; and the Missouri History Museum exhibition, Between Two Worlds: Veterans Journey Home, currently on display at the Museum through October 20, 2013.

To be held at:
Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

Registration not required. FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome. Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in partnership with:

 
Jun 19th, 2013 (Wed)
Exploring Food Through Textures: The Art of Balance, Variety, and Moderation
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

On the Menu: The Science of Food
Featured Speakers: Lauren Landfried, R.D., L.D., Instructor, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Saint Louis University; Dan Brewer, M.S., R.D., L.D., Chef Instructor, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Saint Louis University

Join us for an evening of art, food and science. We are creating a healthy meal using the dietitian's 3 favorite words - balance, variety, and moderation - while exploring different textures to show that food that is good for you can appeal to all of your senses. Tasting is included in the event.

Location: Webster House Galleries
7522-7526 Big Bend Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63119

Registration required. SPACE is LIMITED. FREE and OPEN to ALL. For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition A Feast For The Eyes, A Food Inspired Art Exhibition on display at Webster House Galleries from June 7 – July 19, 2013.

 
Jun 20th, 2013 (Thu)
Science & Art Lunch with Bill Smith: Beyond the Humanities
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Artist Bill Smith leads a tour of his World Chess Hall of Fame exhibition Beyond the Humanities.

This event is FULL as of Friday, June 14, 2013. Currently accepting WAIT LISTED registrations ONLY.

In the exhibit, Smith weaves together seemingly unrelated subject matter – sculpture, biomathematics, video, physics, fractal geometry, diesel mechanics – to create artworks that highlight how the natural world interacts around us. Lunch follows the tour, and during this time participants have the chance to ask the artist about his background, work, and inspiration. Smith lives and works in southern Illinois and is represented by P.P.O.W Gallery, New York. He received a certificate in mechanics from Ranken Technical Institute, a Bachelor of Science degree in Microbiology and Chemistry from Southern Illinois University, and a Master of Fine Arts degree in Sculpture from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana.

Free and open to all. Event is FULL as of Friday, June 14. Registration is for wait listed ONLY. Space is limited to 20 people. Lunch is provided. For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

To be held at:
The World Chess Hall of Fame
4652 Maryland Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63108

A partnership presentation of:

The World Chess Hall of Fame

 
Jun 20th, 2013 (Thu)
Art - Math - Science and the Game of Chess Collide!
Time: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

FREE STUDENT EVENT - OPEN TO JUNIOR ACADEMY OF SCIENCE STUDENTS: Join artist Bill Smith for a guided tour of his work, currently on view in the World Chess Hall of Fame's exhibition Beyond the Humanities. Smith, who holds degrees in chemistry, biology, and diesel mechanics, in addition to an MFA in sculpture, creates artworks that are inspired by the systems and patterns that are at the core of the natural and technological worlds.

Afterwards, learn about the systems and patterns that comprise the game of chess with an introductory lesson from the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis (CCSCSL). If time permits, participate in a beginners' tournament or simultaneous exhibition with CCSCSL staff!

Free and open to Junior Academy students.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8291.
Deadline to register is noon on June 19th

To be held at:
The World Chess Hall of Fame, 4652 Maryland Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63108
Note: Parents drive students to and from Junior Academy events

A partnership presentation of:

The World Chess Hall of Fame

 
Jun 25th, 2013 (Tue)
Chocolate 101
Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

On the Menu: The Science of Food

EVENT FULL

Featured Speaker: Brian Pelletier, Owner and Chief Chocolatier, Kakao Chocolate

Photo credit: Kakao Chocolate

Do you love chocolate? Join us as we explore chocolate – where it comes from, how it’s made, and what makes it so good – and so good for you! We'll learn about the cocoa bean, cocoa nibs, where chocolate grows, the history of chocolate, and the process of making chocolate. Then Brian will lead you through a selection of Kakao's tasty confections, explaining how they make each one, by hand with all-natural ingredients. (They're always working on something new, so you might just get to try something no one else has had before!)

Participants can bring their own wine or other beverages to pair with the chocolate. Kakao provides the glassware.

Registration required. COST: $20 per person (Includes chocolate but not beverages). EVENT IS FULL.

Location:
Kakao Chocolate
7272 Manchester Road
Maplewood, MO 63143

 
Jul 9th, 2013 (Tue)
Hitting the High Notes: Music Therapy and Its Role in Stress Reduction
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Crystal Weaver, CRC, MT-BC, Music Therapist, Saint Louis University Cancer Center

This event is FULL as of Monday, July 1, 2013. Currently accepting WAIT LISTED registrations ONLY.

Music therapy is a growing field in healthcare. Saint Louis University Cancer Center music therapist, Crystal Weaver provides insightful information on the practices of music therapy in hospitals and clinics throughout St. Louis and shares simple, easy to implement music therapy interventions for stress management.

Photo credit: Saint Louis University


To be held at:
OASIS in Forest Park, Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor’s Center
5595 Grand Drive in Forest Park
St. Louis, MO 63112

Registration required. FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited. Middle and high school students welcome.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.



On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Jul 12th, 2013 (Fri)
Veterinarian Medicine at Long Meadow Rescue Ranch
Time: 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Do you love animals? Have you ever wondered what it might be like to be a doctor of veterinarian medicine? Once again, an "elite tour" for Junior Academy students! Long Meadow Rescue Ranch is one of the most comprehensive horse and farm animal care and rehabilitation centers in the country! JAS students will follow the assessment and treatment plan progress of large animals.

12:30 pm - 1:00 pm Picnic Pavilion available if you would like to bring a bag lunch

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm Ranch tour and program

Open to Junior Academy students. Parents and siblings welcome (and it will be a beautiful drive at this time of year!)

Cost:
Junior Academy students FREE
Parents and siblings are welcome to accompany your Junior Academy student throughout the program at a cost of $5 each. There is no cost if you would like to tour the ranch on your own!

Registration is now closed. This event is full

CLICK HERE for directions
Note: do not use mapquest or your gps (you may end up in a creek!) - follow directions on website
Note: Parents drive students to and from Junior Academy events

RSVP by July 8th

A partnership presentation of:

 
Jul 23rd, 2013 (Tue) -- Jul 24th, 2013 (Wed)
Foodology for Schools: Let's Grow!
Time: 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Special Partnership Presentations

School Summit for the Greater St. Louis Region

Photo Credit: Missouri Botanical Garden

What: A 2-day summit where everyone will be able to share their successes and struggles, take in a film screening together, visit community and school gardens, and think big about our students’ food future.

Who: Educators, district leaders, school food service professionals, school gardeners/groundskeepers, parents, and students (high school and above). Teams of two to five individuals per school and/or district are encouraged.

Why: To learn from each other about ways to get healthier, fresher, more locally grown fruits and vegetables into school gardens, cafeterias, classrooms, and family kitchens.

To be held at:
Missouri Botanical Garden
Monsanto Center
4500 Shaw Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63110

Registration required. For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE

Foodology for Schools is a partnership presentation of:

 
Jul 24th, 2013 (Wed)
Brushing Up on History: Dentistry Through the Ages
Time: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Kurt H. Studt, DDS, MS, FAGD, Clinical Professor of Applied Dental Medicine, Southern Illinois University - Edwardsville; Adjunct Faculty, St. Louis Community College, Department of Dental Hygiene, Forest Park; part-time private practice

George Washington was perhaps the most famous wearer of dentures in American history. Want the tooth, the whole tooth and nothing but the tooth on the dental health and infamous "wooden" teeth of our Country's quintessential Founding Father? Then don't miss this fascinating talk on Dentistry through the Ages with Dr. Kurt Studt. It's a cringe-worthy look back at the history of dentistry with a peek at today's kinder, gentler dental technology.

To be held at:
Center of Clayton OASIS
50 Gay Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63105

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited. Middle and high school students welcome.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.


A partnership presentation of:

 
Jul 25th, 2013 (Thu)
Member Event: John James Audubon's The Birds of America Viewing and Mercantile Library Tour
Time: 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Members Tours

This event is FULL as of Wednesday, July 24, 2013.

Join us for a special viewing of John James Audubon's The Birds of America and a tour of the St. Louis Mercantile Library. Curators from the Mercantile Library will show and discuss the volume in small groups. Docents of the Library will provide a tour of additional collections on display.

Limited to members of the Academy of Science - St. Louis ONLY. Program is designed for high school age and older. Registration is required, but the event is now full. If you would like more information about becoming a member, CLICK HERE or call 314.289.1402.

To be held at:
The Saint Louis Mercantile Library
Thomas Jefferson Library Building
One University Blvd.
St. Louis, Missouri 63121-4400

A partnership presentation of:

 
Jul 28th, 2013 (Sun)
The Asian Elephant's Conservation Conundrums
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Raman Sukumar, Ph.D., Professor of Ecology, Indian Institute of Science

Raman Sukumar is Professor of Ecology at the Indian Institute of Science, recipient of the International Cosmos Prize, and an internationally acclaimed researcher and conservationist of the Asian Elephant.

The Asian elephant has enjoyed a close cultural relationship with people for over four millenia and yet is more threatened than its African cousin. This lecture provides an overview of the status and conservation challenges facing the lesser known elephant throughout its range as a result of habitat loss and fragmentation, poaching and the ensuing conflicts with people. It concludes by explaining that in certain countries such as India and Sri Lanka, where wild populations are increasing, elephants will continue to be managed in human care and their welfare should be an important aspect of conservation efforts.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.


Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

 
Aug 7th, 2013 (Wed)
Create 3D Animated Movie - be part of research study!
Time:

Ever dreamed of making an animated movie!

A research team at Washington University in St. Louis is conducting a research study to create a new programming environment that enables kids to create their own 3D animated movies.

The Academy of Science of St. Louis has teamed up with these researchers to provide an opportunity for young people, ages 10-17, to try out this application.

During the study, participants will make their own short animated movie.

The study takes about 90 minutes and will occur on the Washington University campus. Participants will receive a $10 gift certificate to amazon.com.

There are a limited number of seats available for this event. To fairly accommodate as many kids as possible, please register in the event lottery for a seat.

Please complete the lottery registration form located HERE by Wednesday, August 7th to have a chance to participate.

For more information please contact Kyle Harms at harmsk@seas.wustl.edu.

In partnership with:

 
Aug 11th, 2013 (Sun)
STAR PARTY - OVERNIGHT TO VIEW THE PERSEID METEOR SHOWERS, GEOCACHING AND NIGHT HIKE!
Time: 5:30 PM - 9:30 AM

The STAR PARTY is an annual favorite! Junior Academy students and their families (age 7 and over) will be welcomed with a bar-b-q, Geocaching, and a guided night hike! Rich Hauermann, Administrative Officer, Washington University Earth and Planetary Science, the St. Louis Astronomical Society and NASA Missouri Space Grant Consortium, will provide an overview of the night sky followed by telescope viewing. Be prepared to stay up late. Let's hope for good weather and a clear sky as we view hundreds of shooting stars!
Photo Credit: NASA

Cost is minimal at $31 each - includes:
*Welcome bar-b-q
*Night in shared historic log cabin
*Guided night hike
*Geocaching (GPS & treasures provided!)
*Guided "Night Sky" program and telescope viewing
*Snacks
*Continental breakfast

Note: All students need to be accompanied by at least one adult
Note: Parents drive students to and from Junior Academy events

For more information, call 314-591-0310

REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS AUGUST 1, 2013

REGISTRATION CLOSED - THIS EVENT IS NOW FULL

A partnership presentation of:

 
Aug 20th, 2013 (Tue)
When Soldiers Come Home: The Science of War Injuries from Vietnam to Afghanistan
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Perspectives on Science & History Series

Featured Speaker: Rumi Kato Price, Ph.D., MPE, Professor of Psychiatry and Director, NIDA Post/Predoctoral Training Program, Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine; Interim Director, Health Services Research and Development, Veterans Administration St. Louis Health Care System, Research Service

Photo credit: Washington University School of Medicine

Every major war in modern history spurs technological and scientific developments. The Vietnam War signifies a beginning shift in the investment of science capital to emphasize the psychological injuries of deployment. Washington University psychiatry professor Rumi Price traces the scientific history of treating and preventing war’s “signature injuries,” from the early 1970s to today’s conflict in Afghanistan. She covers current understanding of both the negative and positive impacts of soldiers’ war experiences, talks about best practices for prevention and treatment of war injuries, and based on her research, pays particular attention to the experiences of Missouri’s National Guard soldiers and families.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Between Two Worlds: Veterans Journey Home on display at the Missouri History Museum from April 13 - October 20, 2013. Between Two Worlds explores the 20th century soldier's struggles to stay connected to home and to transition back to home life upon return from service.

To be held at:
Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

Registration not required. FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome. Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in partnership with:

 
Aug 22nd, 2013 (Thu)
Seeing Sounds, Hearing Colors: The Neuroscience of Synaesthesia
Time: 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Berit Brogaard, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy, Center for Neurodynamics, University of Missouri – St. Louis; Principal Investigator, Brogaard Lab devoted to synesthesia and multisensory perception; American editor, international philosophy journal, Erkenntnis

Photo credit: University of Missouri - St. Louis

Painter and photographer David Hockney perceives music in terms of colour and shape, and Richard Feynman and Vladimir Nabokov linked letters and numbers to colours. All three are synaesthetes. Synaesthesia-- a fusion of the senses, is a neurological condition in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway in unusual ways-- letters or numbers have colours, someone hears sounds in response to visual motion. Learn more about this fascinating condition and what it says about the idea that genius and special abilities are hidden aspects of us all.

To be held at:
OASIS in Forest Park, Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor’s Center
5595 Grand Drive in Forest Park
St. Louis, MO 63112

Registration required. FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited. Middle and high school students welcome.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.



On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Aug 23rd, 2013 (Fri)
Lost Golfers: Hydrogeology and Engineering Problems of St. Louis Area Caves and Karst
Time: 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Robert Criss, Ph.D., Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis

While he survived his fall down the “rabbit hole” in mid-March, a relaxing day on the fairway turned into a terrifying ordeal when the ground opened beneath the feet a golfer on a Waterloo, Illinois golf course. The Ozark ecoregion, which includes Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Illinois, and a corner of Kansas, is an area prone to soil collapses. Featuring local examples, hydrologist and Washington University professor, Robert Criss, talks about the uses and importance of caves and springs and the problems that commonly arise when karst lands are developed; and he shares information on nearby places where Missouri’s remarkable karst features can be experienced safely.

Photo credit: Washington University

To be held at:
OASIS in Forest Park, Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor’s Center
5595 Grand Drive in Forest Park
St. Louis, MO 63112

Registration required. FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited. Middle and high school students welcome.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.



On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Sep 16th, 2013 (Mon)
Eco-Recycling St. Louis Tour-- Part 2
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Green Energy Series

This event is FULL as of Thursday, September 12, 2013.

Tour Guide: Jim Jordan, Senior Coordinator, Continuing Education, University of Missouri - St. Louis; Board Chair and Educational Outreach Director, Show Me Solar

Small passenger bus driving tour

Recycling is becoming a common household practice in St. Louis, but what happens to the products and materials we recycle once they arrive at the recycling centers? Visit three recycling facilities – Republic Recycling, Remains Textile Fiber Recycling, and the new Household Hazardous Waste Facility on this guided passenger bus driving tour of Eco-Recycling in St. Louis. Along the way, we’ll stop at Perennial, a repurposing center, to see and learn about the process of reclaiming trash.

Meet at:
OASIS in Forest Park, Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor’s Center
5595 Grand Drive in Forest Park
St. Louis, MO 63112

Registration required.  COST: $20 per person.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited, so register early!  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.



Green Energy Series co-sponsors:

and

 
Sep 23rd, 2013 (Mon)
Denning Ecology of Northern Alaskan Polar Bears: Insights & Implications
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Tom Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences at Brigham Young University, and Research Wildlife Biologist, Polar Bears International

In this 45 minute presentation, Dr. Smith will share his work over the past decade exploring the little known world of polar bear denning on Alaska’s North Slope. Since 2002, Dr. Smith and his crew have studied polar bears' maternal denning ecology—when and where dens are located, den emergence and abandonment dates, why bears remain at dens as long as they do, and how bears respond to human activity near their dens. Dr. Smith will also discuss the impact of climate change and options for polar bears in a warming world. The Zoo’s WildCare Institute is pleased to support the important work of Dr. Smith and his crew, which will help protect and preserve polar bears for future generations.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.


Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

 
Sep 27th, 2013 (Fri)
Academy of Science BioBlitz in Tower Grove Park
Time: 3:30 PM - 8:15 PM

Join teams of scientists and skilled naturalists during BioBlitz in Tower Grove Park. Families with nature lovers, budding scientists and experienced naturalists of all ages are invited. Here’s your chance to learn about everything from fish to fireflies, bats to butterflies.

Join a team - time commitment is 1.5 hours. BioBlitz is a field study of the biodiversity in Tower Grove Park.

For details, visit Academy of Science - BioBlitz

Free and open to all

Students under the age of 18 need to attend with an adult.

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

See you at base camp!

 
Sep 27th, 2013 (Fri)
Giant Tortoises, Backyard Turtles: Racing Extinction with a National Geographic Explorer
Time: 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Teen Science Cafe

A special BioBlitz opportunity for Junior Academy of Science members and teens throughout the region.

Featured Speaker: Stephen Blake, Ph.D., Washington University; Saint Louis Zoo; National Geographic Explorer

Learn about animals on the move in this hands-on Science Café just for Teens. Biologist and National Geographic Explorer, Stephen Blake, tells the story of Movement Ecology (a new field of study that is on the move). You’ll hear about his adventures in animal tracking, from Galapagos tortoise migrations to box turtles in St. Louis. And join Stephen as he leads you in activities that show you the causes and consequences of the foraging, dispersal, and migration behaviors of animals.

Photo credit: National Geographic: Christian Ziegler

FREE and OPEN to Junior Academy of Science members and middle and high school students. Registration required.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

Location:
Tower Grove Park
Old Playground Picnic Pavilion
Map will be provided in your confirmation email.

Time:
5:30 pm - 6:00 pm: Refreshments
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm: Teen Science Cafe

NOTE: Bring lawn chair/s blanket/s. Flashlight.

 
Oct 2nd, 2013 (Wed)
Fueling the Future: Sustainable BioFuels Using Missouri’s River Floodplains
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Science Seminar Series
Featured Speaker: Shibu Jose, PhD., Harold E. Garrett Endowed Chair Professor and Director of the Center for Agroforestry, University of Missouri - Columbia

Researchers have long known the fertile lands of Missouri and the Midwest have the capacity to be powerhouses for biofuel production. What remains elusive is a way to grow the biomass needed to make biofuel without encroaching on land dedicated to food crops, and a way to profitably transport and refine the biomass. Big energy challenges require big ideas and even bigger collaborations. University of Missouri – Columbia’s Advantage researcher Shibu Jose has both.

Photo credit: University of Missouri - Columbia

In response to our country’s advanced biofuels goals, the University led the formation of the Mississippi/Missouri River Advanced Biomass/Biofuels Consortium (MRABC) in 2010, a team of more than 40 academic institutions and agricultural and energy companies working to turn the Missouri and Mississippi rivers into a “biomass corridor” that will provide clean energy for the U.S. and economic opportunity for Missouri—a system with the capacity to produce up to 8 billion gallons of advanced biofuels. It’s a fascinating look at a biomass and biofuels innovation you won’t want to miss.

To be held at: Saint Louis Zoo Living World auditorium (north side of Zoo)

Parking is FREE in Zoo’s North Lot.
FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.
For more information call 314-533-8586 or email events@academyofsciencestl.org


Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

 
Oct 9th, 2013 (Wed)
Women, Warriors & Witchcraft: Carnivore Ecology and Conservation in Tanzania's Ruaha Landscape
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Amy Dickman, Ph.D., Kaplan Senior Research Fellow at Oxford University and founder and director of the Ruaha Carnivore Project (RCP) in southern Tanzania

Tanzania's Ruaha landscape is one of the most important places in the world for large carnivores, holding over 10% of the world's lions, but intense conflict with local people is a huge threat. Warriors often spear and poison carnivores, partly in response to attacks on stock, and partly to demonstrate bravery and acquire wealth. This lecture provides a fascinating insight into how Amy and her team started Ruaha's first carnivore research and conservation initiative, against a backdrop of tribal conflict, poverty and fears of witchcraft. She explains RCP's work and achievements so far, and discusses some of the complexities involved in maintaining dangerous species like lions in an ever more human-dominated world.

Photo Credit: Ruaha Carnivore Project

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.


Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

 
Oct 10th, 2013 (Thu)
Perspectives from Space - with Sandra Magnus, NASA Astronaut
Time: 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Sandra H. Magnus, PhD, former NASA Astronaut and AIAA Executive Director will share her impressions and take-aways from her 16 years as a NASA Astronaut. This will be an enjoyable, informative and inspirational presentation!

Dr. Magnus' NASA career included 159 days in space traveling more than 60 million miles orbiting the earth more than 2660 times. She performed critical functions in Missions STS-112, STS-126 and STS-135/ULF7. Dr. Magnus became Deputy Chief, Astronaut Office, in September 2012.

Dr. Magnus graduated from Bellville West High School in Belleville, IL in 1982, received a Bachelor's degree in Physics and a Master's degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Missouri-Rolla in 1986 and 1990, respectively, and a Doctorate from the School of Material Science and Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1996.

Photo Credit: Anne James

Open to adults and students in Grades 4 and above.

Schedule:
6:00 - 7:00 pm Social/Network - Prologue Room
7:00 - 8:00 pm Presentation - Auditorium
8:00 - 8:30 pm Photos - Prologue Room

Registration deadline is Monday, October 7th
RSVP required by e-mailing Daniel.j.caraway@boeing.com

Cost is minimal at $5/person (includes refreshments - pay at door)

Location: Boeing Prologue Room, McDonnell Boulevard and Airport Road (Park in Visitors Lot, enter through Prologue Room doors)

Seating limited to first 200, please cancel registration if unable to attend.

In partnership with:
Academy of Science - St. Louis
American Institute of Astronautics and Aeronautics(AIAA)
IEEE
Girl Scouts of Eastern Missouri
Missouri Society of Professional Engineers
SCOPE

 
Oct 11th, 2013 (Fri)
To Bee or Not to Bee: The State of the Honeybee
Time: 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Jim Jordan, Beekeeper; Senior Coordinator, Continuing Education, University of Missouri - St. Louis

Catch the buzz about honeybees and learn about the many problems, including colony collapse disorder, our honeybee populations are facing today. Bees contribute over $14 billion dollars in pollinator services each year and are an integral part of agriculture. Hear the latest news from a recent Honey Bee Health Summit and enjoy a honey tasting with beekeeper, Jim Jordan.

To be held at:
OASIS in Forest Park, Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor’s Center
5595 Grand Drive in Forest Park
St. Louis, MO 63112

Registration required. FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited. Middle and high school students welcome.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.



A partnership presentation of:

and

 
Oct 12th, 2013 (Sat)
Green Acres: Sustainable Agriculture in Old North St. Louis
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

On Science Series -- 13th Street Garden Walking Tour and Farmer's Market, includes lunch

This event has been cancelled due to inclement weather. Please check back in summer for a rescheduled date.

Community gardens are changing the ways neighborhoods think about food. Tour the 13th Street Garden and the North City Farmers’ Market on this leisurely and informative Saturday morning outing to see how the Old North St. Louis neighborhood is transforming the way it thinks about fresh, healthy food. Enjoy a picnic lunch from neighborhood coffeehouse, La Mancha, a Puerto-Rican, woman-owned business.

Photo credit: Old North St. Louis Restoration Group

Meet at:
13th Street Garden
2718 North 13th Street
St. Louis, MO 63106

Registration required. Event costs $12 per person and includes lunch. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited. Middle and high school students welcome.

For more information, call 314.533.8586.



A partnership presentation of:

and

 
Oct 22nd, 2013 (Tue)
Missouri Wilderness: The Citizen Campaign that Protected More than 71,000 Acres of Missouri Wildlands
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Perspectives on Science & History Series

Featured Speaker: John Karel, Director, Tower Grove Park; former Director, Missouri State Parks and Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer, 1979-1986

Wild places are balm to the human spirit, and in the U.S., a reflection of the iconic American sensibility to explore. During the 1970’s a grassroots citizen campaign identified and resulted in the ultimate protection and designation of eight tracts of federal land in Missouri under the National Wilderness Preservation System. This is the story of that campaign, the resulting designations, and the meaning and importance of these areas for Missouri’s natural and cultural heritage. Join former Missouri State Parks director, John Karel, for a first-hand account of the Missouri wilderness movement.

Photo credit: © Richard Spener

Presented in conjunction with the photographic exhibition, 50 Years of Wilderness: Through the Lens of Missouri’s 8 Wilderness Areas, on display at the Missouri History Museum from August 31 – February 2, 2014.

To be held at:
Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

Registration not required. FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome. Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in partnership with:

 
Oct 23rd, 2013 (Wed)
Chocolate 101
Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

On Science Series

This event is FULL as of Monday, October 7, 2013. Currently accepting WAIT LISTED registrations ONLY.

Featured Speaker: Brian Pelletier, Owner and Chief Chocolatier, Kakao Chocolate

Photo credit: Kakao Chocolate

Do you love chocolate? Join us as we explore chocolate – where it comes from, how it’s made, and what makes it so good – and so good for you! We'll learn about the cocoa bean, cocoa nibs, where chocolate grows, the history of chocolate, and the process of making chocolate. Then Brian will lead you through a selection of Kakao's tasty confections, explaining how they make each one, by hand with all-natural ingredients. (They're always working on something new, so you might just get to try something no one else has had before!)

Participants may bring their own wine or other beverages to pair with the chocolate. Kakao provides the glassware.

SPACE is LIMITED. Registration required. COST: $20 per person (Includes chocolate but not beverages).

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

Location:
Kakao Chocolate
7272 Manchester Road
Maplewood, MO 63143

A partnership presentation of:

 
Oct 24th, 2013 (Thu)
CosmoQuest: The Secrets of Craters
Time: 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Teen Science Cafe

Featured Speaker: Nicole Gugliucci, Ph.D., astronomer and educator, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

How many craters does the moon have, and what can they reveal about its history? Join us as we hear the story of Dr. Nicole Gugliucci's journey from a doctorate degree in radio astronomy to engaging the public in citizen science through a program called Cosmoquest. Expect hands-on activities that will not only answer these questions, but will also train you to contribute to real research from home!

FREE and OPEN to Junior Academy of Science members and middle and high school students. Registration required.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

Location:
James S. McDonnell Planetarium
Saint Louis Science Center in Forest Park

Time:
5:30 pm - 6:00 pm: Refreshments
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm: Teen Science Cafe

 
Oct 28th, 2013 (Mon)
Ancient Stardust: A Guide to the Hitchhikers of the Galaxy
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Pioneering Science Series

Featured Speaker: Evan Groopman, Ph.D. candidate, Laboratory for Space Sciences, Department of Physics, Washington University in St. Louis

Presolar grains are literally ancient stardust that formed in stellar ejecta before our solar system was born. Many of these grains survived their travels through interstellar space and the formation of the solar system, becoming trapped in early solar system material. By isolating these grains from primitive meteorites that have fallen to Earth and from cometary dust collected by spacecraft, scientists are able to study the grains’ isotopic, chemical, and crystallographic composition and structure; inferring information on their presolar origins and characteristics of their parent stars-- the range of temperatures and pressures in the atmosphere, nucleosynthetic processes; galactic cosmic ray fluxes; and geological processes in the early solar system.

You won't want to miss this cosmic talk on our galaxy's hitchhikers... it’s astrophysics with a microscope! in this fascinating look at presolar grain research and galactic chemical evolution.

DRAWINGS FOR TWO FREE JUNIOR SCIENCE ACADEMY MEMBERSHIPS at each Pioneering Science Seminar. Junior Academy of Science-- Real-world science opportunities and field trips monthly— for students of all abilities in grades 6 - 12.

Location: Kirkwood High School Keating Theater
801 West Essex, Kirkwood, MO 63122

FREE parking in Kirkwood High School lots.

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.



Pioneering Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Oct 29th, 2013 (Tue)
Science of the Hunger Games: Plant Identification
Time: 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Junior Academy of Science

Featured Speaker: Catrina Adams, Ph.D., Education Technology Coordinator, Botanical Society of America and Ethnobotanist

This event is full. Accepting WAIT LIST registrations below.

Lost in the forest without food or provisions? Trying to live in a post apocalyptic world? Could you survive on your plant knowledge? Don't get caught unprepared! Expand your foraging skills and botanical know how in this interactive workshop on identifying medicinal, edible, and poisonous plants. "May the odds be ever in your favor!"

Photo credit: Dr. Catrina Adams

FREE and OPEN to Junior Academy of Science Members and middle & high school students. Registration required.
For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

Location:
St. Louis County Library
Prairie Commons Branch, Auditorium
915 Utz Lane
Hazelwood, MO 63042-2739

A partnership presentation of:

 
Oct 30th, 2013 (Wed)
3D Design Technology and Virtual Environments
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Art & Science Series

Featured Speaker: MyungHee Sohn, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Textile & Apparel Management at University of Missouri - Columbia

3D draping simulation, digital textile printing, 3D body scanning and motion capture are changing the face of apparel management and product development. And they are the basis for a University of Missouri collaborative project between architectural studies and fiber art that allows students to present their work both digitally and virtually. Through the development of 3D virtual garments and the use of a 3D environment space, students are employing the latest in advanced technologies to present their pieces. Don’t miss this up-to-the-minute talk on the use of 3D technology in apparel design. The gallery talk complements Stephanie Liner’s Momentos of a Doomed Construct, in which the artist explores the relationship between people and their physical environment through the installation of her constructed orbs and egg-shaped sculptures.

Presented in conjunction with the Craft Alliance in Grand Center’s Exhibition, Stephanie Liner: Momentos of a Doomed Construct. For more on Momentos of a Doomed Construct, visit http://www.craftalliance.org/exhibitions/currentgc.htm

Craft Alliance in the Kranzberg Arts Center
501 North Grand Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63103

Directions and Parking at http://www.craftalliance.org/contact.htm

FREE and OPEN to ALL.

Seating is limited. Registration required. To register, CLICK HERE or call 314-533-8586.

Dr. MyungHee Sohn is an Assistant Professor at the University of Missouri in the Textile and Apparel Management Department. Prior to her graduate studies, she worked as an assistant designer in Men’s wear division, LG fashion in Seoul, Korea. She received her MS and PhD from Department of Design, Housing and Apparel at the University of Minnesota in 2012. She has taught courses in apparel design including design process, patternmaking, fashion illustration and CAD. Dr. Sohn received the ITAA Lectra Innovation award for faculty research and two grants from MU to strengthen product development technologies in 2012. She also received Peggy Henry Matthews Fellowship and Mary Hoover Award Teaching Excellent in 2010 from the University of Minnesota.

A partnership presentation of:

 
Nov 2nd, 2013 (Sat)
Environmental Stewardship at Forest Park - 15th Annual Honeysuckle Removal Project Day
Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

From our friends at Forest Park Forever

Honeysuckle is a non-native, invasive plant species that negatively impacts native Missouri flora. Volunteers help manage honeysuckle by cutting the vegetation and treating stems to kill the root system.

Students - check with your teachers - many are offering extra credit as part of your community service hours!

The Park Project Day is appropriate for individuals, small volunteer groups and families with children over the age of 12. Children under the age of 18 must have parental/adult supervision at all times. Note: this is a special partner presentation led by Forest Park Forever. Academy staff will not be available to chaperone.

To sign up to volunteer, please RSVP to Cassi at clundeen@forestparkforever or call 314-367-7275, Ext 10 by Monday, October 28th.

A Partner presentation:

 
Nov 2nd, 2013 (Sat)
Robot Race! Build and race light-sensitive robots!
Time: 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Roobik Gharabagi, PhD and William Ebel, PhD, Associate Professors in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology - Saint Louis University and Parks College of Saint Louis University's Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Student Branch (IEEE) invite Junior Academy of Science students to the first annual Billiken Bots competition!

The competition will consist of building and racing a light-sensitive robot. Prizes will be awarded! Lunch will be served along with refreshments for the day.

After lunch, student and faculty will speak about their experiences at Parks in electrical engineering and innovation and answer any questions you may have!

This is a unique opportunity for Junior Academy of Science Students!

Schedule:
9:30 am Registration
10:00 am Build light-sensitive robots
11:30 am - Noon Race Robots! Prizes awarded to fastest!
12:15 pm - 1:00 pm Lunch with Q&A on electrical engineering and innovation in the modern workforce

Cost: free, lunch included.

To be held at Saint Louis University. Map and details will be e-mailed to you.

Open to Junior Academy of Science members.

Registration is now closed. This event is full.

Contact Peggy James Nacke with your questions at 314.533.8291.

A partnership presentation of:

 
Nov 5th, 2013 (Tue)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

To sign up for our e-newsletter, CLICK HERE and receive advance notice of upcoming events, including our Science Careers programs.

 
Nov 6th, 2013 (Wed)
The Higgs Boson and the Fate of the Universe
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Science Seminar Series
Featured Speaker: Joseph D. Lykken, Ph.D., Senior Scientist, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois

Photo credit: CERN

As part of the biggest science experiment ever attempted, physicists have discovered the Higgs boson, at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland. Now a new generation of young scientists, many of them from the USA, are finding creative ways to get this elusive particle, often referred to in popular media as the "god particle," to reveal its secrets. This is a story with many surprises and challenges, including exploding magnets, international conspiracies, dark matter, invisible energy fields, and possibly the end of the universe.

To be held at: Saint Louis Zoo Living World auditorium (north side of Zoo)

Parking is FREE in Zoo’s North Lot.
FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.
For more information call 314-533-8586 or email events@academyofsciencestl.org


Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

 
Nov 7th, 2013 (Thu)
Keeping Time: Mapping the Biological Clock’s Wiring and What Happens When We Ignore the Clocks in Our Brains
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

On Science Series

This event is full as of Friday, November 1, 2013. Accepting WAIT LIST registrations below.

Featured Speaker: Erik Herzog, Ph.D., Professor of Biology in Arts & Sciences, Washington University

Daylight savings time, shift work, school start times, medical intern and long haul trucking schedules, artificial light, international travel… our technologically advanced lives pit us in a precarious battle against the natural rhythms of our biological clocks; and this battle, can throw off more than sleep. Responsible not only for regulating sleep/wake cycles, our internal clocks play an important role in cell division and metabolism control. Recent discoveries by Erik Herzog and his Washington University colleagues about the wiring of our biological clocks have important implications for public health and the consequences of ignoring the clocks in our brains.


To be held at:
Dennis & Judith Jones Visitor Center
5595 Grand Drive
St. Louis, MO 63112

Registration required. FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited. Middle and high school students welcome.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.




On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Nov 7th, 2013 (Thu)
How to Make a Jabberjay: A Discussion on Real-Life Genetic Engineering Technologies
Time: 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Junior Academy of Science

This event is FULL as of Tuesday, November 5, 2013. We are accepting WAIT LIST registrants below.

Featured Speaker: Kevin Gamber, Ph.D., Director, Marketing and Business Development, SAGE Labs

What would you create if you had the tools for genetic engineering? In this interactive discussion on engineering genes, you'll learn how genetic engineering works and how it's being used. From the Hunger Games' fictional Jabberjay to today's real life "talking mouse," a mouse genetically engineered to have a human version of a gene important for speech, we'll investigate the opportunities and challenges of genetic engineering. Will you make a Jabberjay or a Mockingjay?

FREE and OPEN to Junior Academy of Science members and middle and high school students from throughout the region. Registration required. PRE-REGISTRATION open to Junior Academy of Science members through Wednesday, October 30. Registration opens to the public on Thursday, October 31.
For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

Location:
St. Louis County Library
Daniel Boone Branch
300 Clarkson Rd
Ellisville, MO 63011-2222

A partnership presentation of:

 
Nov 8th, 2013 (Fri)
Turf and Trees: A Panel Discussion
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

On Science Series

Wouldn’t you like your lawn to look like the grass at Forest Park, named one of the 10 Most Beautiful Parks in the World by Travel & Leisure Magazine? Imagine if your trees were manicured by experts! Bring your questions about your home lawn and trees to this panel discussion of Forest Park Forever staff and get expert tips.

To be held at:
Dennis & Judith Jones Visitor Center
5595 Grand Drive
St. Louis, MO 63112

Registration required. FREE: Special offer to Academy of Science members and their guests!

For more information, or to register call 314-862-4859 ext 24 and mention that you heard about it from the Academy.



On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Nov 12th, 2013 (Tue)
Comets and Cosmopolitans: Fantastic or Fizzle? ISON the Comet of the Century
Time: 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Rich Heuermann, NASA Missouri Space Grant Consortium, Washington University

This event is FULL as of Monday, November 11, 2013. We are accepting WAIT LIST registrants below.

Sit back, settle in and relax as you sip a cosmopolitan during this exhilarating talk on what could be the most spectacular comet of the century. Fresh from the Oort cloud, a zone of deep-frozen objects orbiting in the dark outlands of our solar system, Comet ISON (named after the International Scientific Optical Network), could provide a spectacular display in November and December’s night skies. That is, if this sun grazing comet survives its hairpin turn around the sun. Cosmopolitans served!


Photo credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63105

Registration required. FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited. Middle and high school students welcome.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.




On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Nov 13th, 2013 (Wed)
Trash to Treasure: The Recycling Economy
Time: 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Exploring Issues in Economics Series

This event is FULL as of Tuesday, November 5, 2013. We are accepting WAIT LIST registrants below.

Featured Speaker: Gary Gilliam, Environmental and Economic Educator, Resource Management

What are the biggest mounds in our region? Not Cahokia, but the landfills holding our trash, though more and more today, items initially slated for the trash heap are being recycled. Recycling company Resource Management’s Gary Gilliam discusses how new markets for recycled materials are developed. Join us for this up-close look at the recycling economy and a tour of the Resource Management facility to see firsthand how these materials are sorted and shipped.

Meet at:
Resource Management in Earth City
4375 Rider Trail N
Earth City, MO 63045

Registration required. FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited. Middle and high school students welcome.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.



A partnership presentation of:

and

 
Nov 13th, 2013 (Wed)
Ghosts in the Sand: Can an Extinct Species Help Save Sahelo-Saharan Wildlife?
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: John Newby, Chief Executive Officer, Sahara Conservation Fund

The scimitar-horned oryx once numbered in the hundreds of thousands across the Sahelo-Saharan Zone of North and West Africa, but faded to extinction by the early 1990s. Paradoxically, this magnificent antelope species thrives in human care in zoo and private collections across the US, Europe and the Middle East, and in surprisingly large numbers. John Newby, CEO of Sahara Conservation Fund and Conservation Fellow of the Saint Louis Zoo's WildCare Institute, will share his insights on the root causes of the scimitar's extinction, and address the question of whether the resurrection of an extinct species using captive-bred animals can lead to a brighter future for other imperiled wildlife in Chad's Ouadi Rimé/Ouadi Achim National Game Reserve. Can the oryx rise from the sands in time to help save Chad's remaining Sahelo-Saharan wildlife?

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.


Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

 
Nov 14th, 2013 (Thu)
Wild Ideas Worth Sharing
Time: 4:30 PM - 7:00 PM

A BiodiverseCity St. Louis Special Partnership Event

This event is FULL as of Monday, November 11, 2013. We are accepting WAIT LIST registrants below.

Wine - Cheese - Insights - Inspiration

The Wild Ideas Worth Sharing speaker series inaugural event is a night to network, learn, and envision a more biodiverse St. Louis region. Three local experts will share insight about what's growing and thriving in St. Louis, and challenge us all to wildly rethink urban and suburban life.

Dr. George Yatskievych
Botanist & Curator, Missouri Botanical Garden
Plants of St. Louis: A Historical Perspective
Not so long ago, the very streets and neighborhoods we live in were prairies, marshes, forests, thickets and open woodlands. As we've urbanized our world, local flora and fauna has undergone profound change. Much of the botanical research in the region has been historically focused, documenting plant species that once thrived here. But how many of those species still grow here today?

Dr. Kyra Krakos
Associate Professor of Biology, Maryville University
Plants, Pollinators & People: A Love Story
Over 80% of all flowering plants require a pollinator. This important ecosystem service directly impacts our agriculture, economy, and ecosystem health. Due to habitat loss, climate change, and invasive species, these plant-pollinator interactions are threatened. New research centered here in the greater St. Louis region is helping us to understand the impacts of our changing world on plant-pollinator interactions. A deeper understanding of plant-pollinator dynamics is necessary for successful conservation and management efforts.

Adrián Cerezo
Conservation Associate, Saint Louis Zoo
Why Urban Biodiversity Matters
For twenty years, Adrián Cerezo has explored environmental education and conservation from multiple perspectives. Adrián's work is guided by one question: can humans learn to live more sustainably? Now based in St. Louis, Adrián is collaborating with local researchers to dig deeper into the connection between humans and biodiversity.

Registration required. Register by Monday, November 11. FREE and OPEN to ALL. Space is limited. Middle and high school students welcome.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

Partnering organizations:

 
Nov 14th, 2013 (Thu)
Tracking to Understand Africa’s Endangered Carnivore: The Painted Dog
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Greg Rasmussen, Ph.D., Founder and Research Director of Painted Dog Conservation

Dr. Rasmussen obtained his Ph.D. from Oxford and has been exclusively working with the painted dog for 24 years. Consequently, he is one of the foremost experts in the field of predator conservation biology.

Recognizing that public perception as a pest and lack of community participation was a driving force of their extinction, Dr. Rasmussen founded Painted Dog Conservation (PDC). PDC employs direct action strategies, alongside education and awareness programs, to change the perception of painted dogs.

As understanding this mis-understood predator is key to its conservation, this presentation will share a deep insight into the amazing social life of the painted dog, and how teamwork makes painted dogs one of the most successful predators in Africa. In this presentation, Dr. Rasmussen will also share recent and fascinating information gleaned from satellite collars, highlight the challenges faced to conserve this enigmatic species and, most importantly, share solutions.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.


Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

 
Nov 16th, 2013 (Sat)
Simulated space missions, rocket launching and more!
Time: 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

From our Friends at the Challenger Learning Center - St. Louis

Celebrate the 10-year anniversary at the Challenger Learning Center - St. Louis. Throughout the day, join in rocket building and launching, model airplane activities, appearance from "Buzz Lightyear," and Planetarium programs.

Simulated space missions will take place every hour on the hour, starting at 10 a.m. with the last mission starting at 4:00 p.m. Reservations are only required for the simulated space missions. Click here to register. Limited to a maximum of 4 people per reservation. The simulated space missions are full - but the rest of the activities are open to all. Note: this is a special presentation led by Challenger Learning Center. Academy staff will not be available to chaperone.

Free and open to the public

To be held at
Challenger Learning Center
205 Brotherton Lane
Ferguson, MO 63135

For more information, call 314-521-6205
Or visit http://www.clcstlouis.org/

Visit website or call 314-537-7889.

 
Nov 19th, 2013 (Tue)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

To sign up for our e-newsletter, CLICK HERE and receive advance notice of upcoming events, including our Science Careers programs.

 
Nov 19th, 2013 (Tue)
2013 Whitney and Anna Harris Conservation Forum: Energy Production Meets Biodiversity
Time: 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Special Partnership Presentations

Whitney and Anna Harris Conservation Forum--
A Conservation Science public forum partnership of the Academy of Science – St. Louis, the University of Missouri – St. Louis Whitney R. Harris World Ecology Center, the Saint Louis Zoo and the Missouri Botanical Garden.

FREE and OPEN to ALL, but Registration is Required.
Call 314-516-6203, or email hintonpa@umsl.edu to register.

EVENING PROGRAM
5:30 p.m. Registration and Exhibit Viewing
6:00 p.m. Session One
7:00 p.m. Light Dinner and Exhibit Viewing
7:40 p.m. Session Two
8:40 p.m. Panel Discussion

Session One: 6 - 6:30 p.m.
Bat Fatalities at Wind Energy Facilities: Causes and Consequences
Featured Speaker: Robert Barclay, Ph.D., University of Calgary
Robert Barclay is Professor and Head of the Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary. His research focuses on the behavioral and physiological ecology of mammals and birds. He is particularly interested in the relationships among roosting and foraging behavior, thermoregulation, reproduction and life histories of bats. His research group also studies the effects of various types of disturbance on bats, including fatalities of migratory bats at wind energy facilities, the impact of urbanization on prairie bats, and how logging, fire and bark - beetle infestations influence habitat selection.

6:30 - 7 p.m.
Cumulative Impacts of Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining on Appalachian Ecosystems
Featured Speaker: Brian Lutz, Ph.D., Kent State University
Brian Lutz is an Assistant Professor of Biogeochemistry at Kent State University. His research focuses on the movement of energy and elements through a wide variety of natural and human altered landscapes, with particular focus on understanding the environmental impacts of energy extraction practices at regional scales. His work on mountaintop-removal coal mining and hydraulic fracturing has been central to ongoing policy discussions surrounding energy security, climate change, and the environment.

Light Dinner and Exhibit Viewing: 7 - 7:40 p.m.

Session Two: 7:40 - 8:10 p.m.
Rapid Expansion of Natural Gas Exploration in North-Central Arkansas: An Aquatic Perspective
Featured Speaker: Sally Entrekin, Ph.D., University of Central Arkansas
Sally Entrekin is an Assistant Professor in Biology, whose research focuses on the relationship between land transformation and biological communities and their associated processes, such as production and decomposition, in headwater streams and wetlands. A primary research goal is to understand how the acquisition, transformation, and transfer of energy and nutrients by biological communities in headwater streams and wetlands change in altered landscapes. She will be discussing a current project that examines the biological response of natural gas development on headwater stream ecosystems.

Session Two: 8:10 - 8:40 p.m.
Hotspots of Genetic Diversity and Solar Energy Harvesting in the Mojave Desert
Featured Speaker: Amy Vandergast, Ph.D., United States Geological Survey
Amy Vandergast is a research geneticist with the Western Ecological Research Center, USGS. Her work focuses on quantifying the impacts of human disturbance on connectivity, genetic diversity, and evolutionary potential of animal populations. She will discuss ongoing research efforts to model habitat and map genetic diversity in the Mojave Desert and examine poten tial impacts of renewable energy development.

Panel Discussion: 8:40 - 9 p.m.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend.

Registration Required: Call 314-516-6203, or email hintonpa@umsl.edu

Partnering organizations:

 
Nov 20th, 2013 (Wed)
Ancient Maya Cuisine and Feeding the Divinities
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

On the Menu: The Science of Food

Featured Speaker: Clarissa Cagnato, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, Washington University in St. Louis

The ancient Maya (ca. AD 250-850) are known for their magnificent pyramids, exquisite art, hieroglyphic writing, and their grasp of time. Less certain are the details of their cuisine. But with access to chocolate, maize, chilies and vanilla, Mayan cuisine was likely remarkable.

Photo credit: Clarissa Cagnato

Anthropologist, Clarissa Cagnato, talks about ancient Mayan diets and the research from two archaeological sites in northwestern Peten, Guatemala, that points to a range of plant foods both worshiped and offered as sustenance to feed the gods. The close relation between the profane and the sacred survives today in the ritual traditions and ancient consumption practices still carried out by contemporary Mayan societies.

Want to learn more about Clarissa and paleoethnobotany, the study of ancient people and plants? Check out Clarissa’s website HERE

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Registration is not required.

For more information, call 314.533.8586.

Location:
St. Louis County Library
Daniel Boone Branch
300 Clarkson Rd.
Ellisville, MO 63011-2222

A partnership presentation of:

 
Dec 4th, 2013 (Wed)
Saving the Fastest Land Animal
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Steve Bircher, Saint Louis Zoo Curator of Mammals/Carnivores

Saint Louis Zoo Curator of Mammals/Carnivores Steve Bircher will share his insights on the plight of endangered cheetah. Cheetahs are in trouble in the wild. In the last century, the cheetah population has declined from 100,000 to fewer than 12,000 individuals, and the species has become extinct in at least 13 countries. International Cheetah Day is celebrated around the globe on Dec. 4.


Photo credit: Ray Meibaum

The Saint Louis Zoo is home to five cheetah (three males, two females). In 1974, the Zoo opened the Cheetah Survival Center, a facility for research and captive breeding. The Zoo coordinates its breeding efforts with other zoos as part of the Species Survival Plan® (SSP) for this species. Already the Zoo has produced more than 30 captive-bred offspring. These animals may provide insurance for wild populations in the future.

Bircher is responsible for managing the Zoo’s carnivore collection, exhibits and physical plant. He began working at the Zoo 35 years ago as an animal keeper, but also held positions as Commissary Supervisor, Zoologist, and Assistant Mammal Curator during his Zoo career. In addition, Bircher serves as Director of the Center for Conservation of Carnivores in Africa within the Zoo’s WildCare Institute. He also serves on the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) management committees for several Carnivore Taxon Groups and Species Survival Plans.

Location: Classroom 2, located in The Living World at Saint Louis Zoo

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.


Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

 
Dec 4th, 2013 (Wed)
Malaria by the Millions: Developing Anti-Malarial Drugs in a Changing Environment
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Science Seminar Series
Featured Speaker: Audrey Odom, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Microbiology, Washington University in St. Louis; 2012 Academy of Science - St. Louis Outstanding St. Louis Scientist Innovation Award recipient

Malaria has caused more human deaths than any other single disease. We have made great strides in controlling the malaria parasite, which was once widespread across Europe and North America (even in Missouri!). Despite this progress, there are still over 250 million cases of malaria each year. Pediatric researcher, Audrey Odom introduces some of the weird and unique biology that lets the malaria parasite sneak by the immune system and resist once-effective anti-malarial drugs. And she discusses the current challenges in control of malaria worldwide and the exciting promise of studies to develop new vaccines and treatments.

Photo Credit: cdc.gov

To be held at: Saint Louis Zoo Living World auditorium (north side of Zoo)

Parking is FREE in Zoo’s North Lot.
FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.
For more information call 314-533-8586 or email events@academyofsciencestl.org


Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

 
Dec 5th, 2013 (Thu)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

To sign up for our e-newsletter, CLICK HERE and receive advance notice of upcoming events, including our Science Careers programs.

 
Dec 6th, 2013 (Fri)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

To sign up for our e-newsletter, CLICK HERE and receive advance notice of upcoming events, including our Science Careers programs.

 
Dec 9th, 2013 (Mon)
The Moral Foundation of Economic Behavior
Time: 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM

Exploring Issues in Economics Series

Featured Speaker: David Rose, Ph.D., Professor of Economics, University of Missouri – St. Louis

Economist and author of The Moral Foundation of Economic Behavior, Dr. David Rose, explains why moral beliefs play an important role in the development and operation of free market societies. For a society to enjoy general prosperity, a climate of trust is necessary to support many of the free market institutions we take for granted in countries like the U.S. Dr. Rose explains why such trust cannot be derived from our genetic hardwiring or from institutions and can only come from culturally transmitted moral beliefs that possess specific characteristics.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63105

Registration required. FREE to the first 10 registrants, $10 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited. Middle and high school students welcome.

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.




Exploring Issues in Economics co-sponsor:

and

 
Dec 9th, 2013 (Mon)
Shattered Arctic
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Randall Hyman, professional photojournalist and writer. His photo essays and articles have appeared in Smithsonian, National Wildlife, American History, British Heritage, Wildlife Conservation and various National Geographic publications.

Randall Hyman takes his audience exploring glaciers, sitting astride icebergs, peering down seal holes in the frozen Arctic Ocean and edging along sheer cliffs amid breeding seabirds. From mid April through early August of this year, Hyman traveled the Norwegian Arctic as an Independent Fulbright Scholar on research ships, coast guard vessels, snowmobiles and ice floes collecting stories, photos and videos about Norway’s struggle with climate change. Norwegian scientists are racing to understand carbon cycle mechanisms, species interactions and long-term climate outlooks as sea ice vanishes and Arctic temperatures continue to climb twice as fast as the global average. If the Arctic is the testing ground for rapid climate change, Norway, with its abundant wealth and excellent environmental record, may be the world’s best test case for how to deal with realities on the ground.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.


Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

 
Dec 10th, 2013 (Tue)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

To sign up for our e-newsletter, CLICK HERE and receive advance notice of upcoming events, including our Science Careers programs.

 
Dec 10th, 2013 (Tue)
From the Mad Men of the 1960s to Today’s Chicago Ad Execs: How Pop Culture Influences Career Choice
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Perspectives on Science & History Series

Featured Speaker: Kristy Tucciarone, Ph.D., Associate Teaching Professor of Media Studies and Advising Coordinator, Department of Theatre, Dance and Media Studies, University of Missouri – St. Louis

Media Studies professor, Kristy Tucciarone, takes a look at how pop culture’s iconic portrayal of the advertising industry in film and television shows like Mad Men and Trust Me influences students’ perception and pursuit of the advertising profession as a career. Don’t miss this in-depth talk on pop culture and its sometimes profound impact on the way students think.

Presented in conjunction with the traveling exhibition, The 1968 Exhibit, on display at the Missouri History Museum from October 5, 2013 – January 5, 2014.

To be held at:
Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

Registration not required. FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome. Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in partnership with:

 
Dec 16th, 2013 (Mon)
Future Trek for 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES for students in grades 6 - 8 at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Fun, informative and fast-paced, 25-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations.

Location: December 16 sessions are at Maryville University.
January and February 2014 Sessions for 6th - 8th Grade Students are being held at the Missouri Botanical Garden's Commerce Bank Education Center. Click the registration link above for more information.

To sign up for our e-newsletter, CLICK HERE and receive advance notice of upcoming events, including our Science Careers programs.

 
Dec 16th, 2013 (Mon)
Area High School Students Share Their Authentic Science Research and Make Real World Contributions in Science
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Pioneering Science Series

Featured Speakers: Academy of Science - St. Louis Science Fair Honors Division Winners and UMSL Students and Teachers as Research Scientists Graduates

Autism - Battery Performance - Computer Science - Diabetes
Area high school students are making real contributions in the world of science. Learn more about their research in this panel presentation featuring local students who are making a difference! Hear about their experiences participating in the programs that allowed them to conduct authentic science research! Find out how you can too!

STUDENT PROJECTS
Academy of Science - St. Louis Science Fair Honors Division
Katie Hufker
Sibs of the Spectrum: Evaluating Support Groups for those who have a Sibling with Autism
Amy Meyer
A Study of Types I and II Diabetes Using Insulin Gene Microsatellites

STARS (Students and Teachers as Research Scientists)
Katriella Lumbantobing
Automated Color Harmonization and Fractal Geometry
Aimun Malik
Extraction of Battery Parameters Using a Non-Linear Equivalent Circuit Model

DRAWINGS FOR TWO FREE JUNIOR SCIENCE ACADEMY MEMBERSHIPS at each Pioneering Science Seminar. Junior Academy of Science-- Real-world science opportunities and field trips monthly— for students of all abilities in grades 6 - 12.

Location: Kirkwood High School Keating Theater
801 West Essex, Kirkwood, MO 63122

FREE parking in Kirkwood High School lots.

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.



Pioneering Science Series co-sponsor:

 

2012 Events

Jan 18th, 2012 (Wed)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

 
Jan 20th, 2012 (Fri)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

 
Jan 24th, 2012 (Tue)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED:
If you would like to select a group, or groups, of 20 – 25, 6th – 8th grade students to participate in Greening Your Future, please contact Science Careers program director, Rose Jansen, at 314-537-7889 or email rjansen@academyofsciencestl.org.

RSVP for Greening Your Future by Friday, January 13.

PLEASE PROVIDE: the date/s you would like to attend, the name and address of your school, grade level/s to attend, number of students per grade level group, and the name and contact information (school, cell and home phone numbers and email addresses) of the teacher chaperone and school principal.

NO MONEY FOR SCHOOL FIELD TRIPS? LIMITED FUNDING MAY BE AVAILABLE for BUS TRANSPORTATION. Call 314-537-7889.

 
Jan 27th, 2012 (Fri)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

NO MONEY FOR SCHOOL FIELD TRIPS? LIMITED FUNDING MAY BE AVAILABLE for BUS TRANSPORTATION. Call 314-537-7889.

 
Feb 1st, 2012 (Wed)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

 
Feb 1st, 2012 (Wed)
Converting Photons to Electrons: Current Status and Likely Future of Solar Photovoltaic Energy Around the World
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Greg Wilson, DSc, Director, National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Trustee, Academy of Science - St. Louis

The photovoltaic effect was discovered in 1839 by French scientist Edmond Becquerel but not properly explained until Albert Einstein’s famous 1905 paper that introduced the idea of energy quanta, or what we now call photons. In 1954, Bell Labs produced the first photovoltaic cell capable of powering an actual device and in 1958, photovoltaic cells were used to power the radios on the Vanguard I satellite. In 1978, President Jimmy Carter had 32 solar panels installed on the White House but these were later removed by President Ronald Reagan in 1986.

So whatever happened to solar energy? Will we ever see solar panels on rooftops here in St. Louis? In order to answer these and other questions, Dr. Wilson discusses recent photovoltaic technology developments and compares the costs of electrical energy produced today by all sources, fossil fuels and renewable, in various locations around the world. Along the way he explores how light is converted to electricity (and conversely, how electricity is converted to light) and how global climate change is already changing the economics of energy.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Science Seminar Series is Co-sponsored by:

 
Feb 8th, 2012 (Wed)
The Beaver’s Tale
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Richard W. Coles, Ph.D., retired Professor and Director, Tyson Research Center, Washington University in St. Louis

The world’s second largest rodent, the beaver plays a pivotal role in the history of St. Louis and a keystone role in the ecology of North America. This widespread furbearer and famously busy ecosystem engineer is second only to humans in its ability to manipulate and change the landscape.

A National Geographic video depicts the beaver’s behavior as it creates habitats that support organisms from algae to moose; and biologist, Dr. Richard Coles, describes how the beaver tail, using a vascular radiator and a counter-current heat exchanger, is engineered to adapt its owner to environments from the Arctic to Mexico. It’s a fascinating look at an animal the American Indians called the “sacred center” of the land.

Location: Belleville East High School Performing Arts Center, 2555 West Boulevard, Belleville, IL 62221

Parking is FREE in school lot.
Refreshments provided at 8:30 p.m. following Q&A.

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

NABT Biology Club Series co-sponsors:

 
Feb 9th, 2012 (Thu)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED:
If you would like to select a group, or groups, of 20 – 25, 6th-8th grade students to participate in Greening Your Future, please contact Science Careers program director, Rose Jansen, at 314-537-7889 or email rjansen@academyofsciencestl.org.

PLEASE PROVIDE: the date/s you would like to attend, the name and address of your school, grade level/s to attend, number of students per grade level group, and the name and contact information (school, cell and home phone numbers and email addresses) of the teacher chaperone and school principal.

 
Feb 16th, 2012 (Thu)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED:
If you would like to select a group, or groups, of 20 – 25, 6th – 8th grade students to participate in Greening Your Future, please contact Science Careers program director, Rose Jansen, at 314-537-7889 or email rjansen@academyofsciencestl.org.

PLEASE PROVIDE: the date/s you would like to attend, the name and address of your school, grade level/s to attend, number of students per grade level group, and the name and contact information (school, cell and home phone numbers and email addresses) of the teacher chaperone and school principal.

 
Feb 17th, 2012 (Fri)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED:
If you would like to select a group, or groups, of 20 – 25, 6th – 8th grade students to participate in Greening Your Future, please contact Science Careers program director, Rose Jansen, at 314-537-7889 or email rjansen@academyofsciencestl.org.

RSVP for Greening Your Future by Friday, January 13.

PLEASE PROVIDE: the date/s you would like to attend, the name and address of your school, grade level/s to attend, number of students per grade level group, and the name and contact information (school, cell and home phone numbers and email addresses) of the teacher chaperone and school principal.

 
Feb 21st, 2012 (Tue)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

 
Feb 21st, 2012 (Tue)
Visions of Common Ground: Land Use Evolution in Kirkwood’s African American Community
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: David Lobbig, Curator of Environmental Life, Missouri History Museum

The Missouri History Museum’s Kirkwood Roots multimedia exhibit explores the history and culture of African American communities in Kirkwood, Missouri. The first suburb west of the Mississippi River, Kirkwood, is now one of the St. Louis metropolitan area’s many municipal districts. Prior to the town’s charter in 1853, Kirkwood’s African Americans had been farmsteading in what had been a rural landscape.

Often overlooked or underestimated, the town’s African American community persisted and grew along with the expanding municipality, witnessing changes in land use such as railway connections to Chicago; an influx of other, especially white, settlers; the dissolution of farms and open spaces; and the suburban boom times after World War II.

Missouri History Museum Environmental Life Curator, David Lobbig, expands and enhances our understanding of changes in land use and lifeways in this behind-the-scenes talk on the research and interviews that went into developing Kirkwood Roots.

Presented in conjunction with the multimedia installation Kirkwood Roots on display at the Missouri History Museum through February 26, 2012.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

 
Feb 24th, 2012 (Fri)
Greening Your Future for 6th - 8th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt featuring the Botanical Garden’s Climatron (world’s first geodesic dome greenhouse), Linnean House (oldest continuously operating greenhouse west of the Mississippi), William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening, and English Woodland Garden.

Bring: Sack lunches and drinks for students, teachers, and chaperones. Sharpened pencils.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED:
If you would like to select a group, or groups, of 20 – 25, 6th-8th grade students to participate in Greening Your Future, please contact Science Careers program director, Rose Jansen, at 314-537-7889 or email rjansen@academyofsciencestl.org.

RSVP for Greening Your Future by Friday, January 13.

PLEASE PROVIDE: the date/s you would like to attend, the name and address of your school, grade level/s to attend, number of students per grade level group, and the name and contact information (school, cell and home phone numbers and email addresses) of the teacher chaperone and school principal.

 
Feb 29th, 2012 (Wed)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

 
Mar 1st, 2012 (Thu)
The Ouchless Emergency Department: Applying Translational Research and A Team Approach
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Robert M. Kennedy, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Associate Director, Education Affairs, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine; St. Louis Children’s Hospital Emergency Department Pediatrician

Passionate about alleviating the pain and anxiety of children who end up in hospital emergency rooms, Washington University professor and St. Louis Children’s Hospital Emergency Department pediatrician, Dr. Robert Kennedy, focused his research efforts on the clinical investigation of pain remediation, to become a recognized leader in the field. His innovations have changed emergency room treatment worldwide.

In this fascinating talk on reducing pain and distress in pediatric emergencies, Dr. Kennedy focuses on lessening the negative impact of medically necessary procedural pain in children receiving care in the ER. He covers non-pharmacological methods, such as distraction and family presence, and work done in the area of local anesthesia for needle sticks and procedural sedation, especially with nitrous oxide (laughing gas) and ketamine. He discusses some of the risks and benefits of sedation techniques and directions of future interest.

STUDENT OPPORTUNITES TO COMPETE FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS— two $250 scholarships for middle and high school students. Attend 3 - 4 seminars or panel discussions and write about your experience. Scholarship decisions announced in May 2011.

DRAWINGS FOR TWO FREE JUNIOR SCIENCE ACADEMY MEMBERSHIPS at each Pioneering Science Seminar. Junior Academy of Science-- Real-world science opportunities and field trips monthly— for students of all abilities in grades 6 - 12.

Location: Kirkwood High School Keating Theater, 801 West Essex,
Kirkwood, MO 63122
FREE parking in Kirkwood High School lots.

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

Pioneering Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Mar 6th, 2012 (Tue)
Driving Tour (small passenger bus)...The Mississippi River Confluence: More than Eagles
Time: 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Tour Guides: Liz Lyons, MDC Conservation Education Supervisor and Jim Jordan, UMSL Senior Coordinator, Division of Continuing Education

This tour takes you to the greatest confluence of big rivers in North America (Illinois, Mississippi, and Missouri Rivers). On our visit to Two Rivers National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Riverlands Army Corp of Engineers, and Marias Temp Clare CA we explore the migratory birds that depend on the bottomlands the three rivers have created. We’ll see ducks, geese, pelicans, herons and other shore birds besides nesting eagles as we discuss current management practices. Learn about the fisheries, geology, and cultural history that shaped this region.

Lunch stop in Grafton (not included in price).

Registration required. COST: $20 per person (Does not include lunch). SPACE is LIMITED to 5 Academy of Science REGISTRANTS. OPEN to ALL. For more information, or to register, e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org, or call 314.533.8586.

A joint program of the Missouri Department of Conservation, OASIS, University of Missouri – St. Louis Division of Continuing Education and The Academy of Science – St. Louis

A partnership presentation of:

 
Mar 6th, 2012 (Tue)
Polar Bear Population Projections: Reliability in the Face of Uncertainty
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Steven C. Amstrup, PhD, Senior Scientist, Polar Bears International

In 2007, Steven Amstrup’s research team at the US Geological Survey projected that by mid-century we would lose two-third’s of the world’s polar bears and that there was reasonable chance they would be extinct by the end of the century if we continued to follow greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions business as usual. More recently, Steven and his colleagues have shown that preventing polar bear extinction is largely a matter of controlling greenhouse gas rise.

Given the natural chaos in the climate system, many have questioned how we could reliably predict what populations might be like in 50 or 100 years. After all, we cannot even predict next week’s weather! The answer to this apparent paradox lies in the concept of threshold exceedence. The persistent climate forcing that results from growing atmospheric GHG concentrations requires a directional response in earth’s climate-that is, the earth must warm. Polar bears depend on sea ice for catching their marine mammal prey. A warmer world will hold less sea ice habitat. Natural variations in weather and climate mean we cannot predict the first summer the Arctic will be ice-free or the first year the mean Cleveland temperature will be 2 degrees higher than it is now, but without GHG mitigation, crossing both thresholds is assured. The farther into the future we look the greater the likelihood these and other critical thresholds will have been crossed.

The most trustworthy climate models are consistent in predicting summer sea ice disappearing between the middle and the end of the century. Even if those models are wrong, the sea ice eventually will disappear without mitigating GHG rise. Warming will constrict polar bears into ever smaller and more vulnerable areas. Seasonal and annual fluctuation in the weather and climate mean that in the short term, some years will be bad for polar bears and some will be better. In the long run, without GHG mitigation, all years will be bad for polar bears and they ultimately will disappear. The good news is that it is not too late to prevent this from occurring. Prompt mitigation will prevent much sea ice loss and preserve sustainable polar bear populations over a majority of their current range. Join Polar Bears International senior scientist, Steven Amstrup for the good news on why it’s not too late to prevent the demise of the polar bear.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations is Co-sponsored by:

 
Mar 7th, 2012 (Wed)
Journey Through the Arctic
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

--lecture and book signing
Special thanks to Journey Through the Arctic sponsor, the Alaska Wilderness League.

Debbie Miller, journalist, teacher, Arctic explorer, conservationist, photographer, and award-winning author of Midnight Wilderness: Journeys in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

Debbie Miller has explored and studied the wilderness and wildlife of the Arctic for more than three decades. Her new book describes the largest expanse of wild lands remaining in America, along with its rich diversity of arctic wildlife: wolves, caribou, grizzly bears, Dall sheep, wolverine, dinosaurs of the past, and a host of migratory birds from all corners of the world.

Journey with Debbie as she paddles 400 miles through the National Petroleum Reserve, a vast region with many special areas in need of lasting protection. The acclaimed author of 15 nature books for children and adults, Debbie is the author of Midnight Wilderness: Journeys in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Braided River, 2011) and a co-author of Arctic Wings: Birds of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Mountaineers Books, 2006). She is a founding board member of the Alaska Wilderness League, an organization whose mission is to protect Alaska's extraordinary wilderness.

Books available for signing and purchase by the author following the presentation.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Science Seminar Series is Co-sponsored by:

Science Seminar Series is underwritten by Cooper Bussmann

 
Mar 13th, 2012 (Tue)
Medieval Ireland: The Kilteasheen Archaeological Project
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

-- lecture and book signing, Medieval Lough Cé: History, Archeology and Landscape

Featured Speaker: Thomas Finan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of History and Director, Center for International Studies, Saint Louis University

The Kilteasheen Archaeological Project began in 2002 as a survey of medieval churches in County Roscommon, Ireland, and developed into one of the largest ongoing research excavations in Ireland in the last decade. Kilteasheen is now known to be a multi-period site, with elements dating back to the Mesolithic and Neolithic periods. The site was occupied as an ecclesiastical center in the early Middle Ages (600-800 AD), and was a major strategic stronghold of the O'Conor kings of Connacht in the thirteenth century. The site was abandoned in the middle of the fourteenth century, possible a result of the plague arriving in western Ireland in 1350. Features excavated on the site include a small castle hall house, a twelfth century church, a managed cemetery, and enclosure. Over 150 skeletons have been excavated at the site.

Books available for purchase and signing following the talk.

To be held at:
OASIS in Forest Park, Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor’s Center
5595 Grand Drive in Forest Park
St. Louis, MO 63112

Registration Required. OPEN to ALL. Middle, high school and university students welcome to attend.

FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited.

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Mar 13th, 2012 (Tue)
Cheetah Conservation Botswana: Carnivore Conservation in the Kalahari
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Rebecca Klein, Managing Director and Founder, Cheetah Conservation Botswana

The cheetah is Africa’s most endangered large cat, with only an estimated 10,000 - 12,000 remaining in the wild. Botswana contains one of the largest cheetah populations in Africa today, yet not without challenges-- the species is threatened due to loss of habitat, declining prey populations, increasing conflict with farming communities, and illegal trade. Cheetah Conservation Botswana was established in 2003, to promote the conservation of the cheetah and other threatened carnivores, through scientific research, community outreach and education. The project investigates and promotes best practices in livestock, range management and non-lethal control methods to reduce human carnivore conflict and conserve habitat, and raises awareness for carnivore conservation and more sustainable futures for Kalahari communities. Rebecca Klein talks about meeting the challenges for Kalahari conservation and ensuring a future for cheetahs and the rich biodiversity of carnivores in the region.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations is Co-sponsored by:

 
Mar 22nd, 2012 (Thu)
Monsanto Tour
Time: 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Event Full

Open to Junior Academy Students and Academy of Science - Science Fair Honors Division Students

Since the mid 1990’s, plants delivering biotech benefits have given farmers new ways to solve old problems. Since 1998, we have introduced 12 new seed traits, and we will be introducing more products in the future.*

Our family of Genuity™ traits is designed to help farmers increase yields through herbicide tolerance, insect protection, weather protection, drought tolerance and increased productivity.

Tour Highlights – What You Will See and Experience:
-Gene Discovery – How we work with nature to find the right gene to produce the desired benefit
-Gene Insertion – How we place the gene into the DNA of the plant
-Tissue Culture – How plants are grown from a single cell
-Greenhouses – How tissue culture plants become commercial products through breeding
-Growth Chambers – A variety of simulated climates that can replicate any growing condition on the planet
-Greenhouse Test Plants – Examples of special traits such as drought tolerance, insect protection and weed resistance

RESERVATIONS REQUIRED-Event Full

Space limited - Today's Junior Academy Tour open to students in Grades 9-12. Note: Students in Grades 6-8 - tour is now open for you on March 29th.

With thanks to Monsanto

 
Mar 23rd, 2012 (Fri)
Cougars in Missouri
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: James Halfpenny, Ph.D., carnivore ecologist, animal tracker, educator and author; president, A Naturalist's World; founder, Human/Lion Interaction Project; Fellow, The Explorers Club

Photo Credit: (c)Jim Halfpenny

Secretive, elusive, graceful, a creature of myths and rumors, and capable of killing people, cougars stir our imagination, curiosity, and fear. Dr. James Halfpenny talks about cougar ecology and lifestyle, and past encounters with humans. A noted carnivore ecologist and founder of the Human/Lion Interaction Project, Jim has investigated and analyzed over 500 interactions between people and cougars. Learn more about these amazing cats and how they have taken up residence in many states from which they were extirpated, including our own Show-Me State.

To be held at:
Missouri Department of Conservation Powder Valley Nature Center
11715 Cragwold Road
St. Louis, MO 63122

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
FREE parking in Nature Center lot.

A partnership presentation of:

 
Mar 24th, 2012 (Sat) -- Mar 25th, 2012 (Sun)
COUGAR Ecology, Behavior & Verification Workshop
Time: 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM

2-Day Workshop for the Curious: Home/Landowners, Educators, Naturalists, Ecologists and Outdoor Enthusiasts

Featured Workshop Presenters: Dr. James Halfpenny, Carnivore Ecologist/Professional Tracker and Mr. Jeff Beringer, Chair, Missouri Department of Conservation, Mountain Lion Response Team

Secretive, elusive, the creature of myths and rumors, and capable of killing people, cougars stir our imagination, curiosity and fear. Improve your knowledge about cougars, their presence, dangers and management. Jim Halfpenny and Jeff Beringer cover cougar ecology, cougars in Missouri, and how cougars interact at the human interface. If you are interested in cougars and want in-depth training in the topics below, then this is the workshop for you:

+ Population, biology, behavior and ecology
+ Cougar/human interactions
+ Cougar pet trade
+ Locating tracks and signs on the trail
+ Identifying footprints and verifying presence
+ Collecting quality evidence
+ Determining sex and size of animals
+ Reading gaits and tracking stories

Photo Credit: (c)Jim Halfpenny

REGISTRATION REQUIRED: For more information on registration and fees, call Jim Jordan, Sr. Coordinator of Continuing Education, UMSL at 314-516-7250, or to register visit ce.umsl.edu/catalog and type in Keyword: cougar.

COST: $125 (plus $12.50 for course workbook)
Lunch on your own at nearby restaurants or bring a sack lunch.

To be held at: MDC Powder Valley Nature Center, 11715 Cragwold Road, Kirkwood, MO 63122-7000

A partnership presentation of:

 
Mar 26th, 2012 (Mon)
Yellowstone Wolves: Restoration, Science, Management and the Future --lecture and book signing
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: James Halfpenny, Ph.D., carnivore ecologist, animal tracker, educator and author; president, A Naturalist’s World; Fellow, The Explorers Club

Reintroduced in 1995 and 1996, wolves are the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem’s top carnivore. Although they attract millions of people to observe them in the wild, some loathe and fear their successful comeback in the Rocky Mountains. Dr. Halfpenny shares the wolves’ behavioral stories, ecological relationships and management alternatives. You’ll hear about pack structures and research revealing new understanding of wolf behavior. Wolf management has changed over the years, and recent delisting has brought new challenges. Jim’s personal encounters provide an intimate look at these stunning and intelligent creatures. Don’t miss this captivating talk on wolves in Yellowstone.
Photo Credit: (c)Jim Halfpenny

Copies of, Yellowstone Wolves in the Wild available for purchase and signing following presentation.

Location: Belleville East High School Performing Arts Center, 2555 West Boulevard, Belleville, IL 62221

Parking is FREE in school lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

NABT Biology Club Series co-sponsors:

 
Mar 26th, 2012 (Mon)
Documentary Film Screening, Revenge of the Electric Car, and Panel Discussion with leading experts on electric vehicles following.
Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

PLEASE NOTE THE DATE FOR THIS EVENT HAS CHANGED and IS NOW, Monday, March 26, 2012.

Filmmaker Chris Paine takes his film crew behind the closed doors of Nissan, GM, and the Silicon Valley start-up Tesla Motors to chronicle the story of the global resurgence of electric cars. Without using a single drop of foreign oil, this new generation of car is America's future: fast, furious, and cleaner than ever.

Join us after the program for a discussion with a panel of local experts.

Featured Panelists:
Jim Curran,
Executive Vice President, The Electrical Connection, IBEW & NECA
Rick Hunter, LEED, AP, CEO and Owner, Microgrid Energy
George Moellenhoff,President, STL Chapter, Electric Vehicles Assoc., Gateway Electric Vehicles Club
Mark Nealon, Manager, System Meter & Smart Grid, Ameren Missouri

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

A partnership presentation of:

 
Mar 27th, 2012 (Tue)
Bears of North America
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: James Halfpenny, Ph.D., carnivore ecologist, animal tracker, educator and author of Yellowstone Bears in the Wild; president, A Naturalist's World; Fellow, The Explorers Club

Photo: Jim Halfpenny measuring grizzly bear tracks. (c) Jim Halfpenny

Bears have played a mythic role for centuries in North America. They are the epitome of wildlands and untrammeled wilderness. As human encounters increased in 2011, polar, grizzly, and black bears have all made the headlines. Photo: (c) Jim Halfpenny

Noted naturalist and carnivore ecologist, Dr. James Halfpenny shares his years of experience studying our continent's largest carnivores. You'll marvel at their diversity and size, learn about their lifestyles, behavior and ecology, and contemplate the future of our ursine friends in this singularly entertaining and informative talk on the Bears of North America.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Special thanks to Bears of North America sponsor and partner,
University of Missouri – St. Louis

Science Seminar Series is Co-sponsored by:

Science Seminar Series is underwritten by Cooper Bussmann

 
Mar 29th, 2012 (Thu)
Monsanto Tour for Junior Academy Students
Time: 3:45 PM - 5:30 PM

Event Full

Open to Junior Academy Students in Grades 6-8

Since the mid 1990’s, plants delivering biotech benefits have given farmers new ways to solve old problems. Since 1998, we have introduced 12 new seed traits, and we will be introducing more products in the future.*

Our family of Genuity™ traits is designed to help farmers increase yields through herbicide tolerance, insect protection, weather protection, drought tolerance and increased productivity.

Tour Highlights – What You Will See and Experience:
-Gene Discovery – How we work with nature to find the right gene to produce the desired benefit
-Gene Insertion – How we place the gene into the DNA of the plant
-Tissue Culture – How plants are grown from a single cell
-Greenhouses – How tissue culture plants become commercial products through breeding
-Growth Chambers – A variety of simulated climates that can replicate any growing condition on the planet
-Greenhouse Test Plants – Examples of special traits such as drought tolerance, insect protection and weed resistance

RESERVATIONS REQUIRED-Event Full

Space limited - Today's Junior Academy Tour open to students in Grades 6-8.

With thanks to Monsanto

 
Mar 29th, 2012 (Thu)
The Lady Anatomist: The Life and Work of Anna Morandi Manzolini
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

--lecture and book signing

Featured Speaker: Rebecca Messbarger, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Italian and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; Director, Undergraduate Studies, Department of Romance Languages and Literature, Washington University in St. Louis

Anna Morandi Manzolini (1714-1774), a woman artist and scientist, surmounted meager origins and limited formal education to become one of the most acclaimed anatomical sculptors of the Enlightenment. Join Rebecca Messbarger, Ph.D., associate professor of Italian and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies and director of undergraduate studies at Washington University's department of Romance Languages and Literature, as she discusses her new book, The Lady Anatomist: The Life and Work of Anna Morandi Manzolini. Messbarger tells the story of Manzolini’s intellectual trajectory from provincial artist to internationally renowned anatomical wax modeler for the University of Bologna’s famous medical school.

Books available for signing and purchase following the talk.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

 
Apr 3rd, 2012 (Tue)
Diversity in Science and Panel Discussion
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Panelists:

Exploring Mars and the Solar System
Abigail Fraeman, Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis

Abby is interested in understanding the history and evolution of Mars and it's moons. She studies the compositions and textual properties of rocks and soils, and interprets them as indicators of past environmental conditions. Abby also analyzes data from spacecraft orbiting Mars and is involved with operations of the Mars Exploration Rovers. And last year, Abby's "MalloMars Rover: Search for S'more Data" came in 3rd place in the Washington Post's weekly Style Invitational asking readers to portray people or events from the 21st century using only food as materials.

Insect Diversity: what geographical scale studies tell us about community biodiversity
Pagi Toko, Pre-Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Biology, Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, University of Missouri - St. Louis

Pagi Toko, from Papua New Guinea, is a Christensen Fellow at the University of Missouri - St. Louis. Pagi is interested in insect plant interactions and their diversity at a broader geographical scale. Understanding species interactions at this larger scale helps us to see how ecological communities are diverse as we see today. Pagi studied moth diversity at an altitudinal gradient in a tropical rainforest and hopes to continue those studies into the future.

From Pac-Man to Flight Simulators
Tonya M. Noble, Software Engineering Manager
The Boeing Company

The classic video game Pac-Man and an Atari 2600 video game system lured Tonya Noble to computers. Tonya is a software engineering manager at Boeing Co.'s Integrated Defense Systems' unit based in Hazelwood. She oversees a team of more than 30 engineers at the unit's Training Systems & Services division, which develops flight simulators used to train military pilots. The simulators are a combination of computer and electronic hardware systems that closely replicate the experience of flying an aircraft. They are used to train pilots who fly various aircraft made by Boeing, including the F-15 Eagle and F/A 18 Hornet jet fighters, and the AH-64D Apache Longbow helicopter. Tonya was honored as a U.S. Most Promising Black Engineer or Scientist in Industry in 2001 and in 2008 was named as one of the St. Louis Business Journal's "40 Under 40."

STUDENT OPPORTUNITES TO COMPETE FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS— two $250 scholarships for middle and high school students. Attend 3 - 4 seminars or panel discussions and write about your experience. Scholarship decisions announced in May 2011.

DRAWINGS FOR TWO FREE JUNIOR SCIENCE ACADEMY MEMBERSHIPS at each Pioneering Science Seminar. Junior Academy of Science-- Real-world science opportunities and field trips monthly— for students of all abilities in grades 6 - 12.

Location: Kirkwood High School Keating Theater, 801 West Essex,
Kirkwood, MO 63122
FREE parking in Kirkwood High School lots.

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

Pioneering Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Apr 10th, 2012 (Tue)
Driving Tour (small passenger bus)… In the Land of the Tigers: Crown Ridge Tiger Sanctuary Tour and Lunch
Time: 9:30 AM - 3:00 PM

Event Full

Tour Guides: Jim Jordan, UMSL Senior Coordinator, Division of Continuing Education and Crown Ridge Tiger Sanctuary Staff

Join us, for a “behind the scenes” tour of the Tiger Sanctuary outside Ste Genevieve where we will see these large cats up close and learn about the Sanctuary’s efforts to preserve these lords of the jungle. Tiger conservation, including Mizzou’s program, and big cat adaptations and natural history are topics of discussion with Jim Jordan, former Zoo Educator.

Registration Required. COST: $40 per person, includes lunch. SPACE is LIMITED to 4 Academy of Science REGISTRANTS. For more information, or to register, e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org, or call 314.533.8586

(Meet at Clayton OASIS.)

A joint program of the University of Missouri – St. Louis Division of Continuing Education and The Academy of Science – St. Louis

A partnership presentation of:

 
Apr 10th, 2012 (Tue)
Next Generation Science Standards Webinar with Stephen Pruitt
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Join Achieve's Vice President for Content, Research and Development, Stephen Pruitt, for a webinar providing an update on the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and the development and review process. The NGSS writing team is working hard on the standards to incorporate feedback from the lead states. Achieve anticipates that the first public draft will be released in April. External reviewers will have about three weeks for review and comment. Please visit the NGSS website to read about the background of the standards, the lead state partners, and the writing team: www.nextgenscience.org.

Download the flyer (PDF) for details and instructions on joining the webinar: NGSS Webinar Invitation. The webinar is free and open to the public.

1-2 p.m. (CST) - Tuesday, April 10
The webinar will be recorded for those who cannot attend.

This is a rare opportunity for advocates of STEM education to participate in a national webinar on the NGSS, don't miss it!

 
Apr 10th, 2012 (Tue)
Destination You: The Future of Our Planet - Public Lecture with Yolanda Kakabadse
Time: 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Join us for Yolanda Kakabadse’s keynote address. Destination You: The Future of Our Planet will focus on this international leader’s unique life-affirming experiences with environmental, social, cultural, and economic sustainability. This session will be live streamed to a global audience and will include an open question and answer session with the speaker. For details Webster University's Global Leaders in Residence program and the full schedule of events, visit http://www.webster.edu/partners/executives.shtml.

Free Publice Lecture - Registration is Required.
Presented by SustainEdge
Reception: 5-6 p.m. – Lecture: 6-7 p.m.
Webster University's Winifred Moore Auditorium

Ms. Kakabadse is widely recognized as a global champion of sustainable development and biodiversity preservation. Her career has taken her around the world, from serving as the Minister of Environment for the Republic of Ecuador to Visiting Professor at Yale’s School of Forestry and Environment. She has been President of the World Conservation Union, Member of the Board of the World Resource Institute, Co-Chair Environmental Sustainability Task Force of the UN Millennium Project, Chair Scientific and Technology Advisory Panel of the Global Environment Facility, and Team Leader for the Poverty and Environment Nexus evaluation of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

Ms. Kakabadse became President of WWF International in January 2010. Her unwavering commitment to nature conservation has been recognized by many international distinctions, including the Global 500 Award of the United Nations Environment Programme, the “Golden Ark Order”, the prestigious Zayed Prize, and a Doctor in Science (ScD) Honoris Causa from the University of East Anglia (2008).

 
Apr 10th, 2012 (Tue)
Reintroduction of the Island Fox
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Cheryl Asa, Ph.D., Fellow and 2009 Outstanding St. Louis Scientist Fellows Award Recipient, Academy of Science – St. Louis; Director of Research, Saint Louis Zoo, Reproductive Physiologist; Advisor on canid reproduction to the IUCN/Species Survival Commission Canid Specialist Group, U.S. Fish & Wildlife SErvice, and AZA Canid Taxon Advisory Group

Recovery of the critically endangered island fox, native to the islands off southern California, depended on captive breeding and required restoring the ecosystem. After fox populations on several of the Channel Islands crashed in the late 1990’s, research determined that human-generated changes to the ecosystem, such as chemical spills off Los Angeles and ranchers allowing pigs to become feral, had created an unprecedented nesting opportunity for golden eagles which resulted in their predation of foxes. Surviving foxes, captured for safekeeping, formed the basis of a captive breeding program that was central to their recovery. Dr. Asa and the Saint Louis Zoo’s research department used video and hormone analyses to monitor fox behavior and reproductive activity for 10 years. Restoration of safe habitat for foxes included reintroducing bald eagles and removing golden eagles. In an all-too-rare example of successful endangered species recovery, captive-born foxes have been released onto the islands and have adapted well to life in the wild. Using fecal samples collected in the field, Dr. Asa’s lab continues to monitor wellbeing of the released foxes.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations is Co-sponsored by:

 
Apr 12th, 2012 (Thu)
Driving Tour (small passenger bus)… In the Land of the Tigers: Crown Ridge Tiger Sanctuary Tour and Lunch
Time: 9:30 AM - 3:00 PM

Tour Guides: Jim Jordan, UMSL Senior Coordinator, Division of Continuing Education and Crown Ridge Tiger Sanctuary Staff

Join us, for a “behind the scenes” tour of the Tiger Sanctuary outside Ste Genevieve where we will see these large cats up close and learn about the Sanctuary’s efforts to preserve these lords of the jungle. Tiger conservation, including Mizzou’s program, and big cat adaptations and natural history are topics of discussion with Jim Jordan, former Zoo Educator.

Registration Required. COST: $40 per person, includes lunch. SPACE is LIMITED to 4 Academy of Science REGISTRANTS. For more information, or to register, e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org, or call 314.533.8586

(Meet at Clayton OASIS.)

A joint program of the University of Missouri – St. Louis Division of Continuing Education and The Academy of Science – St. Louis

A partnership presentation of:

 
Apr 17th, 2012 (Tue)
The Coming War with Robots: A Historical Perspective -- a Lawrence A. Morgan lecture, experts panel, and book signing
Time: 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Why is humanity so fascinated by robots, but at the same time so anxious about our future with them? History professor and author, Minsoo Kang, addresses the long history of human interest in automata and how it provides clues to understanding our current ambivalence in the face of our artificial children. Stay for a discussion after the presentation with Kang and a panel of experts, who will answer questions about the future of robotics in our region and beyond.

6:30-7 p.m. // Hands-on Robotics Activities, Demos, and more
with Boeing and BERSDT
(Broad Engagement Robotics Spiral Demo Team)

Program Schedule:
6:30 p.m. Hands-on Robotics Activities and Demonstrations
7 p.m. Keynote Speaker
7:30 p.m. Experts Panel

Robotics Experts Panel:
Marcos Chu, Engineering Estimator, The Boeing Company and
BERSDT (Broad Engagement Robotics Spiral Demo Team)
Minsoo Kang, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History,
University of Missouri – St. Louis
Bill Smart, Ph.D., Director, Media and Machines Laboratory,
Department of Computer Science & Engineering,
Washington University in St. Louis;
co-chair, IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Committee on
Competitions and Challenges
Matthew Troutman, Ph.D., Mathematics Teacher and
Robotics Team Supervisor, Thomas Jefferson School


Keynote speaker:

Minsoo Kang, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History,
University of Missouri – St. Louis, and author,
Sublime Dreams of Living Machines

Minsoo’s book, Sublime Dreams of Living Machines, will be available for purchase and signing by the author in the Missouri History Museum Shop following the presentation.


Held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in conjunction with:

 
Apr 19th, 2012 (Thu)
2012 Outstanding St. Louis Scientists Awards Dinner
Time: 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM

2012 Outstanding St. Louis Scientists Awards

18th Outstanding St. Louis Scientists Awards Dinner
Thursday, April 19, 2012
Starlight Ballroom – Chase Park Plaza Hotel
Saint Louis, Missouri

complimentary valet parking
complimentary garage parking off Maryland Avenue

Reception: 5:30 p.m.   -   Dinner: 7 p.m.   -   Presentation: 8 p.m.
business attire

Don't miss this exceptional evening, reserve your seat today!
Reservation Deadline: Friday, April 13, 2012

To reserve individual tickets or a table, please contact Lynn Cook
(lcook@academyofsciencestl.org or 314.289.1402)
or fill out the online RSVP here.

For award information, visit our Outstanding St. Louis Scientists Awards page.

 
Apr 21st, 2012 (Sat)
Achievement Ceremony and Young Scientist Program for Junior Academy
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

All Junior Academy students invited to the Achievement Ceremony and Young Scientist Program.

Students will receive their certificates of Achievement for 2011/2012 followed by reception (cake served) and hands-on science activities for Junior Academy students led by Washington University Young Scientist Program.

All Junior Academy students and their families are welcome!

To be held at:
Washington University School of Medicine
Farrell Learning and Teaching Center
Holton Auditorium

To RSVP, click on this link to a secure document:
https://docs.google.com/a/academyofsciencestl.org/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dFdWa3p3SE9FenBIOWVwVVBOTXN6Snc6MQ#gid=0

 
Apr 26th, 2012 (Thu)
Saving the Forest, Saving Ourselves -- a Friends of the Children’s Eternal Rainforest awareness and fundraising forum
Time: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Join us for drinks, hors d’oeuvres and a discussion about how tropical rainforest habitats and global conservation issues impact your life.

Program Schedule
6:00-6:45 p.m. – Drinks and Hors d’oeuvres
7:00-8:00 p.m. – Program
Please join us for coffee and dessert following the program.

Tropical rainforests are one of Earth’s most awe-inspiring and enchanting natural wonders, yet many of these ecosystems are under threat, and their destruction endangers our lives outside the forest. Join us for an inspiring discussion about how the health of these vital habitats and global conservation issues impact us all, and what we are doing to help.

Keynote speaker: Peter Raven, Ph.D.
Dr. Peter Raven, one of the world’s leading botanists and advocates of conservation and biodiversity, is described by TIME magazine as a “Hero for the Planet.” He is President Emeritus of the Missouri Botanical Garden after serving 40 years as its Director. Dr. Raven is chair of the National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration, and chairs the National Research Council’s Division of Earth and Life Studies.

Registration required. FREE and OPEN to ALL.
Details and registration at: www.friendsoftherainforest.org/10years
Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

A partnership presentation and program of:

 
May 1st, 2012 (Tue)
Academy of Science - St. Louis Science Fair
Time: 7:30 AM - 7:00 PM

Project drop off (all projects Grades K-12). All students need to pre-register - see your teacher for registration details.

Fair Location:
Queeny Park
Greensfelder Recreation Complex
550 Weidman Road
St. Louis, MO 63011

 
May 1st, 2012 (Tue)
Changes in Memory & Cognition with Normal Aging & Beyond
Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Featured Speaker:  Lauren Schwarz, Ph.D., ABPP-CN, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Director of Neuropsychology Division, Department of Neurology & Psychiatry, Saint Louis University

Lapses in memory and word finding difficulties are common complaints as we age.  How do we know when we should be concerned about these slips in our abilities?  Saint Louis University neuropsychologist, Dr. Lauren Schwarz, discusses the common cognitive changes that occur with aging and pays particular attention to how to differentiate between normal aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and dementia.  Don’t forget to mark your calendar for this in-depth look at memory and aging.

To be held at:
Kirkwood OASIS at the Kirkwood Community Center
111 South Geyer Road
Kirkwood, MO 63122

Registration Required. OPEN to ALL.  
Middle, high school and university students welcome to attend.
FREE to the first 10 registrants. $9 per person thereafter. Register at rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org, or by calling 314.533.8586.

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
May 2nd, 2012 (Wed)
Academy of Science - St. Louis Science Fair
Time: 10:00 AM - 8:30 PM

Judging - Judges are asked to judge 10 projects which takes about an hour. If you have more time, you are invited to stay and judge a few more!

Complimentary snacks all day for judges. Additionally, complimentary buffet for judges served between 4:30 pm and 6:30 pm.

Judges - Thank you for helping us reach our goal of all projects judged twice!

Fair Location:
Queeny Park
Greensfelder Recreation Complex
550 Weidman Road
St. Louis, MO 63011

 
May 4th, 2012 (Fri)
Academy of Science - St. Louis Science Fair
Time: 10:00 AM - 7:30 PM

10:00 am - 7:30 pm Open for field trips
10:00 am - 7:30 pm Open for project pick-up

6:30 pm - 7:30 pm Awards Ceremony for students in Grades K-5. Blue ribbon and special award winners invited to attend ceremony. Families and teachers welcome.

Photographer will take group photos! All are welcome to take photos!

Fair Location:
Queeny Park
Greensfelder Recreation Complex
550 Weidman Road
St. Louis, MO 63011

 
May 5th, 2012 (Sat)
Academy of Science - St. Louis Science Fair
Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

9:00 am - noon Secondary Award Pick-up (Grades 6-12)
for Blue Ribbon Winners & Special Award winners

Note: secondary students, you do NOT need to be present all morning, just stop by between 9:00 and noon!

PHOTOGRAPHER WILL PHOTO WINNERS INDIVIDUALLY AT THE PHOTO BOOTH!

9:00 am - noon - Project pick-up for all students
Note: Since we do not have a storage facility, projects that are not picked up by noon will be discarded

Fair Location:
Queeny Park
Greensfelder Recreation Complex
550 Weidman Road
St. Louis, MO 63011

 
May 15th, 2012 (Tue)
Getting the Holy Ghost: God Hunting and Tongue-Speaking Experiences in a Pentecostal Church
Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Featured Speaker:  Peter Marina, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Missouri – St. Louis

Sociologist and UMSL Visiting Professor, Dr. Peter Marina, examines a Brooklyn African- American Pentecostal congregation based on unique data: four years of ethnography that paints a portrait of piety, compassion, caring, love — all embraced through an embodiment perspective as members experience these forces in personal ways through religious conversion. The focus on the individual process of becoming Pentecostal challenges previous religious conversion paradigms and advances new ideas to understand “conversion” and “tongue-speaking” as a process. Concepts developed on religious seekership and spiritual capital make sense both empirically and theoretically of Pentecostal social engagement in this rapidly changing, surprising and highly contradictory late-modern church scene.

To be held at:
OASIS in Forest Park, Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor’s Center
5595 Grand Drive in Forest Park
St. Louis, MO 63112

Registration Required. OPEN to ALL. Middle, high school and university students welcome to attend. FREE to the first 10 registrants. $9 per person thereafter. Register at rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org, or by calling 314.533.8586.

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
May 16th, 2012 (Wed)
American Eden: From Monticello to Central Park to Our Backyards -- What Our Gardens Tell Us About Who We Are
Time: 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM



Lecture and Book Signing with Featured Speaker:

Wade Graham, Ph.D.
Landscape designer, historian and writer, adjunct faculty, School of Public Policy, Pepperdine University

Photo Credit: Laure Joliet for The New York Times

Introduction: Peter Wyse Jackson, President, Missouri Botanical Garden

Author Wade Graham presents from his book, American Eden: From Monticello to Central Park to Our Backyards - What Our Gardens Tell Us About Who We Are. He details the social history of four centuries of American gardens and how our relationship with gardens and landscapes has reflected our national identity through the years.

From Monticello to Michelle Obama's kitchen plot, you won’t want to miss this fascinating look at the American love for finding sanctuary and sustenance in our gardens.

Graham is a landscape designer, historian and writer based in Los Angeles who has written widely on issues and policies related to urban life that have appeared frequently in the Los Angeles Times, the New Yorker, and Harper's, among others. Dr. Graham has a PhD in American history and teaches urbanism and environmental policy at Pepperdine University’s School of Public Policy.

Presentation from 11 a.m. to Noon in the Garden’s Shoenberg Theater;
book signing immediately following from noon to 1 p.m. in the Garden Gate Shop.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.
Middle, high school and university students welcome to attend.

Missouri Botanical Garden Shoenberg Theater
4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110

FREE PARKING on site and two blocks west at the Shaw-Vandeventer intersection.

Presented in partnership with:

Missouri Botanical Garden grounds open at 7 a.m. most Wednesdays and Saturdays (exception: special admission rate events). Admission is $8; free to children ages 12 and under and Garden members. St. Louis City and County residents are $4 and free most Wednesdays and Saturdays until noon (exception: special admission rate events – third weekend of May, Memorial Day 2012, Labor Day weekend and first weekend of October). Park for free on site and two blocks west at the Shaw-Vandeventer intersection. The Garden is accessible via public transportation by taking the MetroLink commuter rail line and picking up a Metro bus (www.metrostlouis.org). For general information, log on to www.mobot.org or call the 24-hour recording at 314-577-5100 or 1-800-642-8842.

 
May 26th, 2012 (Sat)
BioBlitz at Creve Coeur Park
Time: 7:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Co-sponsored by: St. Louis Audubon Society

Here’s your chance to learn about everything from butterflies to birds, crickets to katydids! Join teams of scientists and skilled naturalists during the BioBlitz in Creve Coeur Park. Expeditions leave every 30 minutes from the base camp.

Saturday, May 26, 2012  --  7:00 a.m.- 12:15 noon
Visit the Creve Coeur BioBlitz page for all the details.

Families with nature lovers, budding scientists and experienced naturalists of all ages are invited as we study the biodiversity in Creve Coeur Park.

Expedition Teams Full
Visit the Creve Coeur BioBlitz page for all the details.

 
Jun 4th, 2012 (Mon)
Eat Less: Live Better, Live Longer? The Scientific Evidence for Dietary Restriction and A Longer, Healthier Life
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Luigi Fontana, M.D., Ph.D., Research Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Science, and Associate Director, Longevity Research Program, Washington University School of Medicine; Professor of Nutritional Sciences, University of Salerno Medical School, Salerno, Italy

Aging is a complex biological process characterized by progressive functional and structural deterioration of multiple organ systems.  There are currently no interventions or gene manipulations that can prevent, stop or reverse the aging process. However, from yeast to monkeys to humans, there is research to show a number of interventions that can slow aging and prolong lifespan up to 60%.

Today, the average life expectancy for men and women in the U.S. is 81.73 years, though many people begin to experience a significant decline in health at around age 50.  Restrict your calorie intake to three-quarters of what you normally eat and you might not only live longer, but healthier.  Washington University researcher Dr. Luigi Fontana talks about the latest research on calorie restriction and what is says about closing the gap between lifespan and healthspan.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63105

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

To register call 314-533-8586, or e-mail events@academyofsciencestl.org.

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Jun 19th, 2012 (Tue)
Sifting through Ashes: A History of Fire Investigation
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Ronald Gronemeyer, Senior Investigator of Fire Origin and Cause, MK & Associates, LLC; retired Chief Investigator and Fire Captain, Fire Investigation Unit, City of St. Louis Fire Department

In the aftermath of a fire, there are many questions about how and why the disaster occurred. From arson to accident, it is the job of fire investigators to determine the cause of the blaze. Join senior investigator of fire origin and cause with MK & Associates, LLC, Ronald Gronemeyer, as he discusses the history and science of fire investigation.

To be held at:
Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

Registration not required. FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome. Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in partnership with:

Presented in conjunction with the Missouri History Museum exhibition, FIRE! Friend and Foe on display at the Museum, May 19, 2012 through September 3, 2012.

 
Jun 27th, 2012 (Wed)
Fieldwork and Fossils: Primate Adaptations and Ecology
Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

EVENT CANCELLED. We are working to reschedule and will post a new date ASAP. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Featured Speaker: Jason Organ, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, Center for Anatomical Science and Education, Saint Louis University School of Medicine

In an in-depth look at the evolution of primates, Saint Louis University anatomist, Dr. Jason Organ, talks about his primate fieldwork and how understanding feeding and locomotion in mammals by taking a biomechanical and functional approach to bone, tooth and muscle morphology, informs how we know what we know about our own evolutionary history. 

Modern comparative skulls available for viewing following the talk.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63105

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

To register call 314-533-8586, or e-mail events@academyofsciencestl.org.

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Jun 28th, 2012 (Thu)
The Biology of Your Backyard Tree
Time: 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Perry Eckhardt, Urban Forester, Missouri Department of Conservation, Northern St. Louis, St. Charles, Lincoln, and Warren Counties; Certified Arborist MW-5070A

Urban forester Perry Eckhardt provides a basic lesson in tree biology and how it should determine the measures used in caring for the trees and other vegetation near our homes.  Learn how to properly plant, mulch, fertilize, water, and prune, as well as select appropriate plant species for your yard.

To be held at:
OASIS at the O’Fallon Senior Center
106 North Main
O’Fallon, MO 63366

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail events@academyofsciencestl.org.

Photo credit: flickr.com/46867860@N05

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Jun 29th, 2012 (Fri)
Boeing - Where in the world is the Phantom Eye Now?
Time: 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM

Junior Academy students invited to Boeing! Find out where the Phantom is now! Video footage on the biggest screen in the area followed by scavenger hunt in Boeing's famous Prologue room featuring artifacts from the beginning of the space age.

Phantom Eye is Boeing’s first hydrogen-powered High Altitude Long Endurance demonstrator. From stratospheric altitudes, this unmanned vehicle can economically maintain persistent presence over a specific area, while delivering intelligence, reconnaissance, surveillance, and communication capability. Phantom Eye is part of Boeing’s commitment to rapid prototyping and technology development

Registration is closed - this event is full.

 
Jul 13th, 2012 (Fri)
Genome Institute Tour
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

THIS TOUR IS FULL.

Genome mappingFrom the mapping of a deadly pneumonia-causing bacterium to a genome analysis of endangered orangutans, researchers at Washington University’s Genome Institute are studying genome-based data that informs conservation efforts, reveals clues about human evolution, and helps to improve the human condition. 

A world leader in the fast-paced, constantly changing field of genomics, The Institute is one of only three National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded large-scale sequencing centers in the United States.  This insider tour showcases the research that is harnessing the latest in DNA sequencing technologies and ushering in a new age of discovery for human health and disease.

To be held at:
The Genome Institute at Washington University School of Medicine
4444 Forest Park Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63108

Registration required. FREE and OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited to 10 registrants.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

To register e-mail events@academyofsciencestl.org or call 314.533.8586.

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Jul 16th, 2012 (Mon)
Genome Institute Tour
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

THIS TOUR IS FULL.

Genome mappingFrom the mapping of a deadly pneumonia-causing bacterium to a genome analysis of endangered orangutans, researchers at Washington University’s Genome Institute are studying genome-based data that informs conservation efforts, reveals clues about human evolution, and helps to improve the human condition. 

A world leader in the fast-paced, constantly changing field of genomics, The Institute is one of only three National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded large-scale sequencing centers in the United States.  This insider tour showcases the research that is harnessing the latest in DNA sequencing technologies and ushering in a new age of discovery for human health and disease.

To be held at:
The Genome Institute at Washington University School of Medicine
4444 Forest Park Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63108

Registration required. FREE and OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited to 5 registrants.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

To register e-mail events@academyofsciencestl.org or call 314.533.8586.

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Aug 7th, 2012 (Tue)
Anthropology Workshop: Who are We, Really? Connecting Human Origin and Cultural Diversity
Time: 9:30 AM - 1:30 PM

a partnership of the Academy of Science – St. Louis, OASIS,
and the University of Missouri – St. Louis

University of Missouri – St. Louis
Connecting Human Origin and Cultural Diversity Program
201 Ward E. Barnes Library, One University Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63122

NOTE: Bring a sack lunch and drink.

Break down the biological myths and misconceptions that surround the concept of race and take a look at how those myths and misconceptions originated and what they mean in today’s world. Through hands-on lab experiences and discussions, explore human origins and hominid development, archaeological evidence and how anthropologists come to understand the fossil record, and ethnicity in modern humans.

OPEN to ALLSPACE is LIMITED to 20.  Register early.
Workshop is FULL
COST: FREE to Academy of Science members and Junior Academy student members ONLY. 
$14 per person for non-members.  

To register e-mail events@academyofsciencestl.org or call 314.533.8586.

Co-sponsors:

      

 
Aug 11th, 2012 (Sat)
STAR PARTY - OVERNIGHT TO VIEW THE PERSEID METEOR SHOWERS & GEOCACHING!
Time: 5:30 PM - 9:30 AM

The STAR PARTY is an annual favorite! Junior Academy students and their families (over age 7) will be welcomed with a bar-b-q, Geocaching, and a guided night hike! Rich Hauermann, Administrative Officer, Washington University Earth and Planetary Science, the St. Louis Astronomical Society and NASA Missouri Space Grant Consortium, will provide an overview of the night sky followed by telescope viewing. Be prepared to stay up late. Let's hope for good weather and a clear sky as we view hundreds of shooting stars!
Photo Credit: NASA

Cost is minimal at $31 each - includes:
*Welcome bar-b-q
*Night in shared historic log cabin
*Guided night hike
*Geocaching (GPS & treasures provided!)
*Guided "Night Sky" program and telescope viewing
*Snacks
*Continental breakfast

Note: All students need to be accompanied by at least one adult

Please contact Peggy James Nacke if you have questions:
314-533-8291 or e-mail: peggyn@academyofsciencestl.org

Peggy will contact you via e-mail after you submit your rsvp registration (below) with Star Party details and link for payment.

Registration is now closed - this event is full.

 
Aug 22nd, 2012 (Wed)
Anatomy Lessons: Reading the Body in Emily Dickinson's Poetry
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Barbara Baumgartner, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, Washington University in St. Louis

Emily Dickinson was among the first generation of students to study anatomy and physiology in school. Barbara Baumgartner, senior lecturer of women, gender, and sexuality studies at Washington University, discusses the development of this intellectual discipline, the information contained in the anatomy text that Dickinson actually studied, and the ways in which the images and concepts contained therein informed her poems.

Presented in partnership with the Missouri History Museum exhibition, Underneath It All, on display at the Museum, June 30, 2012 through January 27, 2013.

To be held at:
Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

Registration not required. FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome. Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in partnership with:

 
Aug 29th, 2012 (Wed)
Birds Behind the Banana Republic: Avian Conservation in Honduras
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Presented in partnership with the Missouri Conservation Heritage Foundation

Robert Gallardo, Naturalist, Honduran bird guide and author, Bird Sounds of Honduras, Field Guide to the Birds of Celaque National Park, Field Guide to the Birds of Lake Yojoa, and the forthcoming Field Guide to the Birds of Honduras; co-founder, the Honduran Ornithological Association

Honduras, literally, great depths, sits at the heart of Central America. With the largest percentage of natural forest cover remaining in the region and much of the Central American continent’s largest wilderness, the country is a conservation hotspot and a mecca for migrating birds.

Photo credit: Keel-billed Motmot (c) Robert Gallardo

More than 200 avian species make their way to Honduras, with many spending up to seven months on critical wintering grounds. With so much forest cover, Nearctic-Neotropical migrants can be found everywhere. Over 745 species have been recorded, and though only one, the endangered Honduran Emerald, is a known endemic, the country holds vital populations of species such as the Great Green Macaw, Harpy Eagle, Snowy Cotinga, Keel-billed Motmot and the Ocellated Quail.

Robert Gallardo, leading authority on Honduran avifauna works to promote avian conservation projects in Honduras and is at work with noted bird illustrator, John Sill, on a field guide to depict all the country’s known species. In St. Louis for one night only, Robert showcases the rich and diverse birds of Honduras as he shares stories from nearly 20 years of adventures exploring remote Honduran landscapes to document 30 avian species never before recorded in this lush Central American country.

For more information on Robert and the Birds of Honduras, please visit his website at http://www.birdsofhonduras.com.

To be held at: Saint Louis Zoo Living World auditorium (north side of Zoo)

Parking is FREE in Zoo’s North Lot.
FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.
For more information call 314-533-8586 or email events@academyofsciencestl.org

Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

Science Seminar Series underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussman.

 
Sep 7th, 2012 (Fri) -- Sep 8th, 2012 (Sat)
BioBlitz in Forest Park
Time:

Join teams of scientists and skilled naturalists during the 24-hour exploration in Forest Park. Expeditions leaving every hour from the base camp which is located behind the Dennis & Judith Jones Visitor & Education Center (Forest Park Forever Building). (Volunteer commitment = 1.5 hours.) Families with nature lovers, budding scientists and experienced naturalists of all ages are invited. Here’s your chance to learn about everything from fish to fireflies, bats to butterflies. For details, visit http://academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/bioblitz/forest_park/index.php

Students under the age of 18 need to attend with an adult.

Registration is now closed - check back next week for team registration for the first Tower Grove Park BioBlitz!

See you at base camp!

NOTE: must be pre-registered to participate

Sponsored by:

and

 
Sep 13th, 2012 (Thu)
Wildlife Rescue: Lessons from the Gulf Oil Spill
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Photo courtesy AP/Alex Brandon

Featured Speaker: Dr. Erica Miller, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research, Inc., http://wwwtristatebird.org

In 2010, one of the worst oil spills in history occurred in the Gulf of Mexico. This tragic event led to the creation of emergency response hospitals where over 50 species of birds were stabilized, cleaned, rehabilitated and released.

Photo courtesy Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research, Inc.

Join Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research wildlife veterinarian, Dr. Erica Miller, as we explore wildlife rehabilitation centers, long-term recovery of wildlife in the Gulf, and how Tri-State led a team of colleagues in creating emergency response during the BP-Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

BPRE Breeding Photo: Rehabilitated brown pelicans released on Little Egg Island Bar. Photo courtesy of Georgia Department of Natural Resources

To be held at:
Saint Louis Science Center (lower level) May Hall
Parking is FREE in the Science Center Lot.

FREE & OPEN to ALL. Recommended for high-school-age students and adults.

SPACE is LIMITED. Registration required. For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

Wildlife Rescue is a partnership presentation of:

 
Sep 21st, 2012 (Fri)
BioBlitz in Tower Grove Park
Time: 11:00 AM - 8:00 PM

Join teams of scientists and skilled naturalists during the first BioBlitz in Tower Grove Park. Families with nature lovers, budding scientists and experienced naturalists of all ages are invited. Here’s your chance to learn about everything from fish to fireflies, birds to butterflies. For details, visit http://academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/bioblitz/tower_grove_park/index.php

Students under the age of 18 need to attend with an adult.

REGISTRATION OPENS IN SEPTEMBER

See you at base camp!

NOTE: must be pre-registered to participate

 
Sep 24th, 2012 (Mon)
Elephants for Africa
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Kate Evans, Ph.D., Executive Director and founder, Elephants for Africa http://elephantsforafrica.org

The idea for Elephants for Africa arose out of founder, Kate Evan's Ph.D. fieldwork on elephants in Botswana's Okavango Delta. From the outset, Kate had a vision that the research projects on which she worked could be expanded to address the wider conservation and management issues facing the African elephant, both nationally and internationally.

In 2007, the charity Elephants for Africa (EfA) was set up to support elephant conservation through research and education. Continuous behavioral and ecological research on over 1,000 known individuals and numerous other unidentified elephants has enabled Elephants for Africa to make informed decisions about elephant management and conservation. EfA's inspiring outreach programs focus on environmental education for the children of Botswana and scholarship programs that support Botswana nationals through their post-graduate degrees.

Join us for an in-depth look at the history, current work and future of Elephants for Africa.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

Photos courtesy of EfA.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

Conservation Conversations are underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussmann.

 
Oct 9th, 2012 (Tue)
Cheetah Conservation Fund/Namibia
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Laurie Marker, Ph.D., founder and Executive Director, Cheetah Conservation Fund.

Dr. Laurie Marker is recognized as a leading expert on cheetahs – their biology, genetics, ecology, breeding, and conservation. In 1990, Marker left her position with the Smithsonian, and moved to Namibia to found the Cheetah Conservation Fund so she could work directly with cheetahs in the wild.

From humble beginnings interviewing local farmers for field research, Dr. Marker built an impressive Conservation Centre that comprises 100,000 acres, a vet clinic, genetics lab, model farm with goats, sheep and cows, livestock guarding dogs, and approximately 50 orphaned or injured cheetahs.

Among the programs that Dr. Marker has created is the Livestock Guarding Dog program, which breeds and trains Anatolian shepherd and kangal dogs to protect local herds so that farmers are not threatened by the presence of cheetahs on their land.

Dr. Marker is a recipient of the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, The Tech Museum's Intel Environmental Prize, and a two-time finalist for the prestigious Indianapolis Prize. She was named a Hero for the Planet by Time Magazine and has been featured in Smithsonian Magazine as well as on numerous television shows, including The Tonight Show, Good Morning America and the Today Show.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Bring a brown bag lunch, or purchase lunch at the Zoo's Painted Giraffe.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

Conservation Conversations are underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussmann.

 
Oct 10th, 2012 (Wed)
Solar Energy Tour (small passenger bus guided tour)
Time: 12:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Green Energy Series

Tour Guide: Jim Jordan, Senior Coordinator, Continuing Education, University of Missouri - St. Louis; Board Chair and Educational Outreach Director, Show Me Solar

TOUR IS FULL.

Experience how solar energy is powering homes and businesses in St. Louis on this small passenger bus guided field trip.

You'll tour a home designed with a focus on sustainability and universal accessibility and an older South City home retrofitted with solar panels; learn about different types of solar panels at Ameren's Renewable Energy Learning Center; and enjoy some pub grub and wet your whistle (beverages not included in cost) as we continue our discussion on our final stop at the Civil Life Brewery-- powered by 104 solar panels. You'll meet solar home and business owners, an energy engineer, and a solar installer on this up-close and engaging look at solar energy in St. Louis.

Meet at:
Dennis and Judith Jones Visitors Center in Forest Park
5595 Grand Drive
St. Louis, MO 63112

Parking is available in the lot across from the Visitors Center, or on the street in Forest Park.

Registration required.  COST: $30 per person.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited, so register early!  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.


Green Energy Series co-sponsors:

and

 
Oct 10th, 2012 (Wed)
Murky Waters: Warning Signs About Human Impact on Our Waterways
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Science Seminar Series

Featured Speaker: Diana Papoulias, Ph.D., Research Scientist and Fish Biologist, U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia Environmental Research Center

The quality of our national waters has improved tremendously since passage of the Clean Water Act. Today, rarely do rivers catch fire and entire lakes die, but our nation’s surface waters continue to receive millions of pounds of pesticides, pharmaceuticals, nutrients, industrial, agricultural, and domestic waste that adversely affect fish and wildlife. Like the canary alerting miners of dangerous conditions in the coal mine… in our waterways, the intersex sturgeon of the Missouri River, the immunocompromised bass in the Potomac, and many other species with health problems and abnormalities, serve as sentinels to alert us of the adverse consequences of our historic and contemporary use of chemicals. Join USGS research scientist, Dr. Diana Papoulias, for a look at how environmental chemicals affect the health of our waterways and the fish that call these waters home. Photo Credit: Diana Papoulias

The USGS is a source of natural science information vital for understanding the quantity and quality of our earth and living resources. This information improves our understanding not only of how human activities affect environmental and ecological health, but also of how the quality of our environment and wildlife in turn affects human health.

Read about Diana and the U.S. Geological Survey's research on intersex sturgeon in the Missouri River in a Missouri River Relief blog post from December 2010. Photo Credit: Joseph R. Toelleri

To be held at: Saint Louis Zoo Living World auditorium (north side of Zoo)

Parking is FREE in Zoo’s North Lot.
FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.
For more information call 314-533-8586 or email events@academyofsciencestl.org

Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

Science Seminar Series underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussman.

 
Oct 11th, 2012 (Thu)
Lights, camera, action--chloroplasts!
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Presenter: Ram Dixit, Ph.D., Washington University Assistant Professor of Biology.

Are you interested in plants? Do you want to be a biologist or do you wonder what that would mean?

Explore the plant growth and microscopy research facilities at the Biology Department at Washington University for this special opportunity for Junior Academy of Science students. Includes hands-on experiment that will investigate the role of light in controlling the movement of chloroplasts in leaves.

Find out how you will be able qualify for Arabidopsis seeds and fluorescent protein samples that you can take home for additional experimentation!

Open to Junior Academy Students. Space limited.

THIS EVENT IS FULL.

Questions, contact Peggy James Nacke 314-533-8291, or e-mail peggyn@academyofsciencestl.org.

 
Oct 12th, 2012 (Fri)
Gone Fishing: Washington University Zebrafish Facility Tour
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

On Science Series

Tour Guide: Erik Andrew Sanders, Fish Facility Research Lab Manager

TOUR IS FULL.

At one of the world’s largest and most modern zebrafish facilities, tiny tropical fish are helping scientists understand human development and disease from birth defects and cancer to muscle and nerve disorders. Zebrafish are transparent, so scientists can see the progression of their research in real time. With almost 7,000 tanks, a 2,000-tank nursery and robots to feed its 500,000 residents, the facility is the envy of researchers in labs around the world. Fish Facility Research Lab Manager, Erik Andrew Sanders takes us on a behind-the-scenes tour of Washington University’s new zebrafish facility.

To be held at:
Washington University School of Medicine
McDonnell Sciences Building
4565 McKinley, St. Louis, MO 63110

Paid parking is available in the Taylor Street Garage at the corner of Taylor and Clayton Avenue, or metered on the street.

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.


On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Oct 15th, 2012 (Mon)
The Truth About Chimpanzees
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speakers:
Crickette Sanz, Ph.D.,
Co-Director, Goualougo Triangle Ape Project; Assistant Professor, Physical Anthropology, Washington University in St Louis, and
David Morgan, Ph.D., Co-Director, Goualougo Triangle Ape Project; Research Fellow, Lincoln Park Zoo Lester E. Fisher Center for the Study and Conservation of Apes

Join explorers and primatologists David Morgan and Crickette Sanz as they share their groundbreaking discoveries from the Congo about mankind’s closest living relatives. For the past decade, they've trekked the forests of the Republic of Congo’s Goualougo Triangle to uncover truths about chimpanzees and their gorilla neighbors. Their research on ape behavior and the impact of logging in this eco-sensitive region was featured in the February 2010 edition of National Geographic magazine.

Drs. Sanz and Morgan co-direct the Goualougo Triangle Ape Project in the Congo's Nouabale-Ndoki National Park. It is one of a few sites in all of Africa to include focused studies on sympatric (occupying the same, or overlapping geographic areas without interbreeding) populations of chimpanzees and gorillas.

To learn more about Drs. Sanz and Morgan and the Congo's Goualougo Triangle apes, visit National Geographic on-line.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

Photos courtesy of EfA.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

Conservation Conversations are underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussmann.

 
Oct 17th, 2012 (Wed)
Venerated Ancestors: Mummies of the Ancient Andes
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Special Partnership Presentations

Featured Speaker: Jane E. Buikstra, Ph.D. School of Human Evolution & Social Change, Director of the Center of Bioarchaeological Research, Arizona State University; President, Center of American Archaeology, Kampsville, Illinois

Join anthropologist and bioarchaeologist, Jane E. Buikstra, Ph.D., for a look at the mummies of the Ancient Andes.

Using seven case studies, Dr. Buikstra explores mummification and related practices in ancient South America. From bioarchaeology's deep time perspective she begins with a look at the world's earliest prepared mummies, the Chinchorro, and ends with Inka examples, considering both methods of mummification and knowledge captured in the course of study.

Meet the Speaker reception with refreshments following in the History Museum Atrium.

To be held at:
Missouri History Museum
Lindell and DeBalievere in Forest Park
St. Louis, MO 63112

Parking is FREE in the Museum lots or in Forest Park.

FREE and OPEN to ALL.

Venerated Ancestors is a partnership program of The Academy of Science St. Louis, The Explorers Club St. Louis, the Archaeological Institute of America St. Louis Society, and the Missouri History Museum

Explorers Club St. Louis

 
Oct 18th, 2012 (Thu)
Action For Cheetahs In Kenya
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speakers:
Mary Wykstra, MEM.,
Principal Investigator and Director, Action for Cheetahs in Kenya, and
Cosmas Wambua, M.Sc., Senior Research Scientist, Action for Cheetahs in Kenya

Mary Wykstra and Cosmas Wambua of Action for Cheetahs in Kenya have been working together since 2002 conducting research and community conservation programs in Kenya. The two are traveling across the U.S. to bring new insights into cheetah conservation efforts.

Action for Cheetahs in Kenya works closely with local wildlife author­i­ties and land hold­ers to develop poli­cies and pro­grammes which sup­port wildlife con­ser­va­tion and human liveli­hoods for the long-term devel­op­ment of sus­tain­able human and wildlife zones.Since 2008, the Zoo’s WildCare Institute Center for Conservation of Cheetahs in Africa has been partnering with Action for Cheetahs in Kenya and supporting its important cheetah conservation efforts.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Bring a brown bag lunch, or purchase lunch at the Zoo's Painted Giraffe.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

Conservation Conversations are underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussmann.

 
Oct 23rd, 2012 (Tue)
Tracking Turtles from the Volcanoes of Galapagos to Washington University's Tyson Research Center and Downtown St. Louis
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Stephen Blake, Ph.D., Programme Coordinator, Giant Tortoise Project; post-doctoral Researcher, Max Planck Institute of Ornithology; International Volunteer, Charles Darwin Foundation, Galapagos; Adjunct Researcher, Saint Louis Zoo, Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis and School of Environment and Forestry, State University of New York; visiting scientist, Washington University in St. Louis

Dr. Stephen Blake spent the last 20 years working in the tropics as a conservation ecologist; most of that time in the Congo Basin working for the Wildlife Conservation Society in a variety of roles concerned with forest ecosystem management and species conservation, notably forest elephants. In 2007, Dr. Blake had the opportunity to live and work in the Galapagos Islands, and for the past three years he has worked on the movement ecology and conservation of giant Galapagos tortoises. More recently Stephen and colleagues from the Saint Louis Zoo, Washington University, and Forest Park Forever have initiated a study of box turtles in Forest Park and at Tyson Research Center.

Iconic Galapagos tortoises are the world's largest living terrestrial reptiles and are famous for stimulating Charles Darwin’s early ideas on evolution by natural selection. Despite their fame, the ecology and conservation status of Galapagos tortoises remains remarkably poorly understood.

In this fascinating look at turtles and tortoises, Stephen Blake introduces an applied research programme that seeks to understand the movement ecology of Galapagos tortoises, during which long distance stereotypic seasonal migrations have been documented for the first time. He illustrates efforts to translate applied science into exciting conservation outreach and education for the children of Galapagos – the future stewards of the Islands. And he discusses the parallels between the Galapagos tortoises and box turtles right here in St. Louis, and describes a sister programme to the Galapagos work for conservation, research, and education of turtles that has been piloted in Forest Park and Washington University's Tyson Research Center.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

Conservation Conversations are underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussmann.

 
Oct 24th, 2012 (Wed)
Painted Dog Conservation Project
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Greg Rasmussen, Ph.D. Director, Painted Dog Conservation

Greg Rasmussen (born in London, UK) is a British Wildlife conservation biologist who has studied the African Wild Dog for over twenty years, working in the Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. He is the founder and Director of the Painted Dog Conservation project.

Painted Dog Conservation (PDC) is a leading model for community-based predator conservation. By combining the most advanced modern technology with traditional knowledge of local communities, PDC has experienced great success – Zimbabwe's wild dog population has increased from 400 to 700 individuals since the project's inception. PDC's model also brings direct benefit to local people with increased employment and unparalleled education opportunities.

Dr. Rasmussen was also featured on an episode of Discovery's "I Shouldn't Be Alive." The episode recounted the story of his survival after a plane crash while he was tracking a rhino. For more information on Dr. Rasmussen visit Wildlife Conservation Network.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Bring a brown bag lunch, or purchase lunch at the Zoo's Painted Giraffe.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

Conservation Conversations are underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussmann.

 
Nov 3rd, 2012 (Sat)
Honeysuckle Project - Removal and Crafts!
Time: 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

HONEYSUCKLE PROJECT ACTIVITIES SCHEDULE:
Honeysuckle Removal: 9:00 am - Noon
Sustainable Art with St. Louis ArtWorks--Honeysuckle Wreath & Ornament Making: 11:00 am - 2:00 pm

Note: You do not need to stay the entire time - you can jump in for and hour or so!

SUSTAINABLE ART: Utilize the natural honeysuckle vines for a GREAT HOLIDAY CRAFT ACTIVITY! Junior Academy students invited to join St. Louis ArtWorks at the Visitors Center to make honeysuckle wreaths and ornaments! Students will also learn graphic design and make interpretive signs for the Big Muddy Fish and Wildlife Reserve. Students will get to take home their creations! Free
Fun! Students participating at the St. Louis ArtWorks wreath/ornament making will be entered into a drawing for ArtMart Gift Cards!

It's that time of year again, Junior Academy students continue their environmental stewardship and join over 100 volunteers in the honeysuckle removal at Forest Park. Honeysuckle is a non-native invasive plant species that is detrimental to native plants and shrubs.

Students - check with your teachers - many are offering extra credit as part of your community service hours!

Students must be accompanied by an adult.

CLICK HERE TO RSVP - Map of projects in the park will be e-mailed back to you with your confirmation

Partnering organizations:

ST. LOUIS ARTWORKS

 
Nov 6th, 2012 (Tue)
Eco-Recycling St. Louis Tour Part I (small passenger bus guided tour)
Time: 8:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Green Energy Series

TOUR IS FULL

Tour Guide: Jim Jordan, Senior Coordinator, Continuing Education, University of Missouri - St. Louis; Board Chair and Educational Outreach Director, Show Me Solar

Recycling is becoming a common household practice in St. Louis, but what happens to the products and materials at the recycling centers to close the loop?

We'll visit four facilities that recycle single stream recyclables, electronics, concrete/asphalt and shingles from construction as well as a methane to megawatts project at the old Fred Weber landfill in Maryland Heights to see and learn about the process of reclaiming trash and returning it to the resource stream.

Meet at:
University of Missouri - St. Louis
One University Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63121

Registration required.  COST: $22 per person.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited, so register early!  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.


Green Energy Series co-sponsors:

and

 
Nov 7th, 2012 (Wed)
Local Solutions, International Support: African Women in Agricultural Research and Development (AWARD)
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Science Seminar Series

-- Local Solutions, International Support is being presented in partnership with NOVUS International

Following a successful three-year pilot program, African Women in Agricultural Research and Development (AWARD) was established in 2008 as an on-going project of the Gender & Diversity Program of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), AWARD offers two-year Fellowships to women scientists from Africa who are already working closely with the rural poor on tackling issues of poverty and hunger.

Meet three of these Fellows currently working with St. Charles-based Novus International to alleviate poverty, increase food security, and improve the lives of smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa.

Featuring 2010 AWARD Fellows:

Vettes Kalema, Lecturer, Makerere University, Uganda
Vettes is assessing the economic contributions of Uganda’s rapidly vanishing woodlands to rural livelihoods with hopes of both preserving the country’s fragile forests and developing alternative income-generating activities for Ugandan families who depend on the forests for everything from food and firewood to medicine.

Olapeju Onadipe, Assistant Project Coordinator/Research Associate, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria
Olapeju is working to improve the livelihoods of farmers, processors and local marketers in the cassava sector through a multi-country project to increase food security.

Matilda Ayim-Akonor, Research Officer, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Animal Research Institute, Ghana
Fighting livestock diseases that have caused the collapse of many of Ghana’s large farms and that threaten the extinction of the few that remain, Matilda is hoping to help farmers increase their earnings, reduce unemployment, and rekindle interest in livestock and poultry production, particularly among youth.

To be held at: Saint Louis Zoo Living World auditorium (north side of Zoo)

Parking is FREE in Zoo’s North Lot.
FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.
For more information call 314-533-8586 or email events@academyofsciencestl.org

Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

Science Seminar Series underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussman.

 
Nov 8th, 2012 (Thu)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

 
Nov 8th, 2012 (Thu)
2012 Whitney and Anna Harris Conservation Forum
Environmental Issues of St. Louis: Past, Present, and Future
Time: 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Special Partnership Presentations

Whitney and Anna Harris Conservation Forum--
A Conservation Science public forum partnership of the Academy of Science – St. Louis, the University of Missouri – St. Louis Whitney R. Harris World Ecology Center, the Saint Louis Zoo and the Missouri Botanical Garden.

FREE and OPEN to ALL, but Registration is Required.
Call 314-516-6203, or email hintonpa@umsl.edu to register.

EVENING PROGRAM
5:30 p.m. Registration and Exhibit Viewing
6:00 p.m. Session One
7:00 p.m. Refreshments and Exhibit Viewing
7:40 p.m. Session Two
8:45 p.m. Panel Discussion

Session One: 6 - 7 p.m.
Whatever Happened to Yesterday's Environmental Problems? Lessons from St. Louis
Featured Speaker: Andrew Hurley, Ph.D.
Andrew Hurley is a professor in the Department of History at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. His fields of interest are urban environmental history and 20th century United States public history. He is the author of, Environmental inequalities: Class, race, and industrial pollution in Gary, Indiana, 1945-1980 (University of North Carolina Press, 1995); Common fields: An environmental history of St. Louis (Missouri Historical Society Press, 1997); Chasing the American dream: A history of diners, bowling alleys and trailer parks (Basic Books, 2001); and Beyond preservation: Using public history to revitalize inner-cities (Temple University Press, 2010).

Refreshments and Exhibit Viewing: 7 - 7:40 p.m.

Session Two: 7:40 - 8:45 p.m.
A Living and Growing Legacy of Environmentalism in University City
Featured Speaker: Shelley Welsch
Shelley Welsch is mayor of University City. Early in her professional career she worked in local radio in St. Louis and Memphis. She spent ten years with ABC Network News in Washington D.C. and St. Louis where she worked as an assignment manager, producer, writer and special events producer. She served on the City Council of University City for four years, and on numerous boards including the Literacy Council of Greater St. Louis and ALIVE (Alternatives to Living in Violent Environments). She was one of the founders and the first Executive Director of the Green Center, a center for outdoor environmental education and the arts located in University City. She was elected mayor in 2010.
Where Ecology Fits into the City of St. Louis' Sustainability Plan
Featured Speaker: Catherine L. Werner, J.D., LEED, AP
Catherine Werner is Sustainability Director in the City of St. Louis Mayor's Office. She is an environmental attorney, LEED AP, sustainability, green building and natural resources specialist, and environmental educator with a successful record in promoting and managing various sustainable development and conservation initiatives as well as in handling diverse matters of environmental law and policy. Catherine has extensive experience in real estate and ecological/green residential design issues.
Birds in Everyday Baltimore: The Baltimore Ecosystem Study Bird Monitoring Project
Featured Speaker: Charles Nilon, Ph.D.
Charles Nilon is Professor of Fisheries and Wildlife at the University of Missouri-Columbia. His research considers the impact of urbanization on wildlife habitats, populations and communities. Included in this research are projects ranging in location and degree of development from inner city neighborhoods in St. Louis and Baltimore to the more suburban and rapidly urbanizing areas around Columbia, Missouri. Since 1997, he has been a co-principal investigator on the Baltimore Ecosystem Study. The project in Baltimore and a similar one in Phoenix are the first two urban ecosystems included in the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research program.

Panel Discussion: 8:45 - 9 p.m.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend.

Registration Required: Call 314-516-6203, or email hintonpa@umsl.edu

Partnering organizations:

 
Nov 8th, 2012 (Thu)
Emerging Technologies in the ER
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Special Partnership Presentations

Featured Speaker: Jason Wagner, M.D., Assistant Residency Program Director, Director of Simulation Studies, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine

Imagine the emergency room of the future. What life-saving technologies will it have? What advances will increase the efficiency of doctors, nurses, and technicians? Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine and Director of Simulation Studies for Emergency Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine, Dr. Jason Wagner, takes us on a fascinating trip to visit the future of Emergency Medicine.

To be held at:
Saint Louis Science Center Exploradome Exhibit Hall
5050 Oakland Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110
Parking is FREE in the Science Center Lot.

FREE & OPEN to ALL. Recommended for high-school-age students and adults.

SPACE is LIMITED. Registration required. For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.

Emerging Technologies in the ER is a partnership presentation of:

 
Nov 9th, 2012 (Fri)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 AM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

 
Nov 14th, 2012 (Wed)
Water on the Moon
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

The Robert M. Walker Distinguished Lecture Series 2012

Featured Speaker: Maria Zuber, PhD., E. A. Griswold Professor of Geophysics as MIT

Dr. Zuber matches theoretical modeling of the interiors of planets and moons to spacecraft-acquired camera, altimetry, and gravity data to study the structure and dynamics of these solar system bodies. She is the Principle Investigator for the NASA Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory Mission (GRAIL) and the Lead Scientist of the Laser Ranger, the NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission.

Ideas about whether the Moon contains water - and, if so, how much - have changed a great deal over the years. The earliest observations of the Moon from Earth interpreted the dark nearside regions as "seas" that were later learned to be large volcanic flows in massive impact basins. Much later, when the first Apollo samples were analyzed, the Moon was believed to be "bone dry." More recent laboratory and orbital remote-sensing observations have found additional clues that provide a complex but fascinating picture. This presentation reviews our current understanding of water on and inside the Moon, how it got there, and what it means for the history of our nearest neighbor in space.

To be held at:
Washington University in St. Louis - Whitaker Hall 100

Whitaker Hall is located on the northeast block of the main University campus, at the corner of Hoyt Drive and the Forest Park Expressway, one block west of Skinker. Parking free in WU lots next to Whittaker Hall

Free and open to all

Junior Academy Students invited to "meet & greet" with Dr. Zuber afterwards!

Junior Academy Students - CLICK HERE to RSVP:

 
Nov 15th, 2012 (Thu)
An Olympics for the Savages: Science, Sport, and Race at the 1904 World's Fair and Olympic Games
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Perspectives on Science & History Series

-- lecture and book signing, The 1904 Anthropology Days and Olympic Games: Sport, Race, and American Imperialism

Featured Speaker: Susan Brownell, Ph.D.,author and Professor of Anthropology, University of Missouri - St. Louis

Susan Brownell, professor of anthropology at the University of Missouri St. Louis and editor of The 1904 Anthropology Days and Olympic Games, takes a fascinating look through the lens of sport at the bad science of race that justified the “Anthropology Days,” experiment in which "savages" took part in sports so their performances could be compared with those of the athletes at the 1904 World's Fair and Olympic Games. And she asks whether or not those perceptions continue to inform today’s modern Olympic competitions.

Books available for purchase and signing following the talk.


Start of the 1904 Olympic Marathon. Frank Pierce, a Comanche representing the New York Pastime Athletic Club, wears number nine. From Mark Bennitt and Frank Parker Stockbridge, eds. History of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition (St. Louis: Universal Exposition Publishing Company, 1905), p. 565.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Our Olympics on display at the Missouri History Museum through November 18, 2012.

To be held at:
Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

Registration not required. FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome. Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in partnership with:

 
Nov 16th, 2012 (Fri)
Calorie Restriction and Exercise: Powerful Protection Against Disease and Aging
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Edward "Ted" Weiss, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nutrition and Dietetics, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Saint Louis University

Calorie restriction and exercise protect against many chronic diseases, increase average lifespan, and improve quality of life. Animal studies show that calorie restriction, but not exercise, increases maximal lifespan by 30-50%.

In humans that could translate to the oldest people in our society living 120-150 years. Discuss evidence for and against the possibility that calorie restriction might increase human lifespan.
Photo (jodigreen via Flickr)

To be held at:
OASIS in Forest Park, Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor’s Center
5595 Grand Drive in Forest Park
St. Louis, MO 63112

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.


On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Nov 20th, 2012 (Tue)
The Unique Conservation Challenges of Saving the Vulnerable Desert Humboldt Penguin in Punta San Juan, Peru
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Conservation Conversations Series

Featured Speaker: Michael Macek, Curator of Birds, Saint Louis Zoo; Director, Center for Conservation of the Humboldt Penguin, Punta San Juan, Peru

Unlike their polar cousins, temperate species of penguins such as the Humboldt, are presented with a unique set of conservation challenges. At the turn of the century, the Humboldt penguin was thought to exist in numbers close to several hundreds of thousands. Today, only 60,000 survive. Threats vary from overfishing of the penguins' main prey species, Anchovetta, to the increased frequency of El Nino events.

Photo Credit: (Codefor via Flickr)

The Center for Conservation of the Humboldt Penguin in Punta San Juan, Peru, has been working with a network of partners over the course of the last ten years to develop a multifaceted conservation program. Through these partnerships, real change has occurred and the future of the Humboldt penguin looks brighter.
Humboldt penguins in Puntos San Juan, Peru. Photo Credit: Patricia Majluf courtesy Saint Louis Zoo

Michael Macek has been the Saint Louis Zoo's Curator of Birds for the past 18 years. In addition to managing the Zoo’s collection of nearly 200 avian species, Michael oversees three long-term in-situ Zoo sponsored conservation endeavors involving the threatened Humboldt penguin in Punta San Juan, Peru; the critically endangered horned guan in Chiapas, Mexico; and the critically endangered avifauna of the Mariana Islands.

Michael Macek, Saint Louis Zoo's curator of birds, evaluates Humboldt penguins in Punta San Juan, Peru.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations co-sponsor:

Conservation Conversations are underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussmann.

 
Nov 28th, 2012 (Wed)
Missouri River Graveyard of Ships
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Steve Dasovich, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Lindenwood University

For hundreds of ships that have plied the waters of the Missouri River, its murky depths are an underwater tomb. Done in by calamities such as fires, explosions, ice floes and run-ins with toppled trees, the river houses the skeletons of hundreds of wood-devouring, smoke-belching steamboats from the heyday of riverboat steamers.

Join maritime archaeologist and Lindenwood University professor, Dr. Steve Dasovich, for a fascinating look at the science and history of preserving the Missouri River’s Graveyard of Ships.

To be held at:
OASIS at the O’Fallon Senior Center
106 North Main
O’Fallon, MO 63366

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.


On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Nov 29th, 2012 (Thu)
Beyond Earth: A Personal Experience of Human Space Flight and the Course of Future Exploration
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Pioneering Science Series

Science Opportunities Fair
6-6:45 pm
Keating Theater Lobby

Representatives from community organizations will be available to share information about summer and other science opportunities for students.

Featured Speaker: Linda M. Godwin, Ph.D., former NASA Astronaut; Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri - Columbia

This hometown girl from Missouri is the second woman to have earned a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Missouri – Columbia, one of only 523 humans to have traveled to space, and the fourth woman ever to have stepped out of the space shuttle – twice. UMC professor and former astronaut Linda Godwin is a veteran of four shuttle flights; and she shares her experiences on her Space Shuttle journeys, including visits to the Russian Space Station MIR, and the International Space Station. And she talks about what the United States plans to do in the next few years in space, the possibilities of going beyond low Earth Orbit, and the efforts of the private space industry to provide Low Earth Orbit access. Don't miss this Pioneering Science seminar on the final frontier.

Astronaut Linda M. Godwin, STS-108 mission specialist, works in the Rafaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) on the International Space Station (ISS).

Astronaut Linda M. Godwin, STS-108 mission specialist, is pictured near the end of the Space Shuttle Endeavour's remote manipulator system (RMS) arm during the four-hour session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Daniel M. Tani (out of frame), mission specialist, joined Godwin on the space walk.

STUDENT OPPORTUNITES TO COMPETE FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS— two $250 scholarships for middle and high school students. Attend 3 seminars or panel discussions and write about your experience. Scholarship decisions announced in May 2013.

DRAWINGS FOR TWO FREE JUNIOR SCIENCE ACADEMY MEMBERSHIPS at each Pioneering Science Seminar. Junior Academy of Science-- Real-world science opportunities and field trips monthly— for students of all abilities in grades 6 - 12.

Location: Kirkwood High School Keating Theater
801 West Essex, Kirkwood, MO 63122

FREE parking in Kirkwood High School lots.

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

Pioneering Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Dec 4th, 2012 (Tue)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

 
Dec 5th, 2012 (Wed)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

 
Dec 7th, 2012 (Fri)
Future Trek for 6th Grade Students
Time: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

SESSIONS ARE FULL.

PLEASE SEE Greening Your Future Science Careers SESSION OPEN DATES at http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/science_careers.php or call 314-537-7889. REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.

Four fun, informative and fast-paced, 20-minute classroom sessions with working scientists, engineers and STEM professionals, explore careers in science through interactive and hands-on demonstrations. Students participate in an afternoon scavenger hunt at the Science Center.

Location: Saint Louis Science Center Taylor Community Resource Center, 4900 Manchester, St. Louis, MO 63110 (SW corner of Kingshighway and Manchester)

 
Dec 7th, 2012 (Fri)
Monster in the Hollow: The Story of Missouri's Ozark Dinosaur
Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

On Science Series

Featured Speaker: Michael Fix, Associate Teaching Professor of Geology; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri - St. Louis.
Professor Fix working on a partial skeleton of the Missouri State Dinosaur - Hypsibema missouriense at the Bollinger County Museum of Natural History.

Join Missouri Ozark Dinosaur Project geologist, Michael Fix, as he explores the Chronister Site – Missouri's only known dinosaur find, from the accidental discovery of dinosaur fossils there in the 1940s to the eventual scientific excavations many decades later and the major fossil discoveries that resulted from those early stumbled-upon bones. You’ll be transported back to the late Cretaceous period some 75 million years ago when dinosaurs and other prehistoric monsters roamed our state.

Photos courtesy of Michael Fix.

To be held at:
Kirkwood OASIS at the Kirkwood Community Center
111 South Geyer Road
Kirkwood, MO 63122

Registration required.  FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter.  OPEN to ALL.  Space is limited.  Middle and high school students welcome. 

For more information, or to register, CLICK HERE, or call 314.533.8586.


On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Dec 12th, 2012 (Wed)
CyberForensics: From Data to Digital Evidence
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Science Seminar Series

Featured Speakers: Albert J. Marcella Jr., Ph.D., CISA, CISM, Professor, George Herbert Walker School of Business and Technology, Webster University, and
Frederic Guillossou, CISSP, CCE, Information Security Analyst, TALX, a division of Equifax

-- lecture and book signing, Cyber Forensics: From Data to Digital Evidence

Very organized criminals, terrorists, information thieves, nation states, interlopers, and even disgruntled employees are using today’s technologies and looking to the evolving technologies of tomorrow, to successfully circumvent controls, commit fraud, steal data, launder money, gain imbalanced market advantages, compromise strategic resources, disrupt workflows, engage in cyber bullying and stalking activities, all leading to an erosion of our national and personal sense of security.

These individuals utilize the ever increasing power and breadth of technology, to carry out their objectives, undermining, attacking and using these same technologies, which governments, businesses, and individuals depend upon for a daily existence.

Traditional criminal forensics analysts use among other tools… fingerprint, blood splatter and ballistic analysis, DNA typing, and forensic pathology to gather and present evidence, which may be used to establish guilt or innocence.

Cyber forensic investigators dissect the repository of a computer’s memory using HEX editors and write blockers, examining volumes, partitions, boot records and FAT Tables; to identify, collect, preserve, examine and evaluate data, data representing potential electronic evidence. Evidence, which is used, in part, to determine intent, culpability, motive, means, methods and loss, resulting from the use and involvement of information technologies in perpetrating a crime.

Dr. Marcella examines the origins of digital data, the role of binary and hexadecimal numbers in identifying potential evidence, how digital data become electronic evidence, and the overall process of cyber forensics investigations.

To be held at: Saint Louis Zoo Living World auditorium (north side of Zoo)

Parking is FREE in Zoo’s North Lot.
FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.
For more information call 314-533-8586 or email events@academyofsciencestl.org

Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

Science Seminar Series underwritten in part through the generous support of Cooper Bussman.

 
Dec 13th, 2012 (Thu)
Brushing Up on History: Dentistry Through the Ages
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Perspectives on Science & History Series

Featured Speaker: Kurt H. Studt, DDS, MS, FAGD, Clinical Professor of Applied Dental Medicine, Southern Illinois University - Edwardsville; Adjunct Faculty, St. Louis Community College, Department of Dental Hygiene, Forest Park; part-time private practice

George Washington was perhaps the most famous wearer of dentures in American history. Want the tooth, the whole tooth and nothing but the tooth on the dental health and infamous "wooden" teeth of our Country's quintessential Founding Father? Then don't miss this fascinating talk on Dentistry through the Ages with Dr. Kurt Studt. It's a cringe-worthy look back at the history of dentistry with a peek at today's kinder, gentler dental technology.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Discover the Real George Washington: New Views from Mount Vernon on display at the Missouri History Museum through January 21, 2013.

Exhibition visitors can see the only surviving complete set of George Washington’s dentures, ca. 1790-1799. Courtesy of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association.

To be held at:
Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

Registration not required. FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome. Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in partnership with:

 

2011 Events

Jan 18th, 2011 (Tue)
Zoo - behind-the-scenes tour for Junior Academy student members!
Time: 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

A private behind-the-scenes tour will be provided to our Junior Academy student members (parents welcome!).

Led by Jeff Ettling, Curator of Herpetology & Aquatics; Director, Center for Conservation of Near East Mountain Vipers; Director, Ron Goellner Center for Hellbender Conservation, Saint Louis Zoo.

Conservation Efforts for Endangered Vipers: The Saint Louis Zoo is well known for its in-situ and ex-situ conservation efforts for vipers inhabiting the Caucasus region. There is more going on off-exhibit at the Herpetarium than most people realize. Go behind the scenes with curator Jeff Ettling to get a sneak peak at the breeding programs for the Armenian viper and its closest relatives!

Join this insider tour for Junior Academy student members. This is your own science briefing! Afterward, feel free to stay for the "Conservation Conversation" at the Living World where Jeff features the Viper habitats and conservation efforts!

Meet in the lobby next to St. Louis Zoo Living World auditorium and parking is free in the Zoo North Lot.

Photo Credit: Saint Louis Zoo

RSVP by January 14th to Peggy James Nacke 314-533-8291 or e-mail peggyn@academyofsciencestl.org

This Junior Academy event is co-sponsored by:

 
Jan 18th, 2011 (Tue)
Aiding Armenian Vipers
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Jeff Ettling, Curator of Herpetology & Aquatics; Director, Center for Conservation of Near East Mountain Vipers; Director, Ron Goellner Center for Hellbender Conservation, Saint Louis Zoo

The Armenian viper, a medium-sized snake with a known range that includes Armenia, northwestern Iran, eastern Turkey, and northeastern Iraq, is in trouble in the wild. Agricultural activities have severely modified and fragmented their habitat; and the species is threatened by over-collection for the pet trade, human persecution and possibly warfare. In the mid- 1960’s population densities of Armenian vipers were estimated at 20 – 50 snakes per hectare. Current reports indicate population densities are 4 – 10 vipers per hectare and that populations are declining.

Several Russian herpetologists have studied the ecology of the Armenian viper in the mountains of Armenia, and briefly described reproductive behavior and timing of mating; but, data on habitat use, home range size, movement patterns, seasonal activity and population structure are lacking. Given the fragmented distribution of the Armenian viper and the ever-increasing human impact on its population numbers and habitat, a comprehensive conservation management plan is needed. The Saint Louis Zoo’s WildCare Institute Center for Conservation of Near East Mountain Vipers has been collaborating with colleagues from the Armenian Academy of Sciences since 2004 on a long-term investigation of the spatial ecology and population structure of the Armenian viper. Come hear about what the team has learned about the natural history of this threatened species.

Photo Credit: Saint Louis Zoo

All Conservation Conversations are held in the St. Louis Zoo Living World auditorium and parking is free in the Zoo North Lot.

For more information call 314-533-8586 - Note: no need to RSVP for this event.

Conservation Conversations are Co-sponsored by:

 
Jan 19th, 2011 (Wed)
Celebrate BioBlitz! The findings of a 24-hour exploration of Forest Park!
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Ever wonder what animals and plants live in Forest Park? BioBlitz is a blend of science, celebration, education, community, and loads of fun. Biologists and skilled naturalists led public teams as they scoured the park's 1,371 acres to see what lives in its streams, praries, woods and grasslands. This is an evening to report the September findings!

Join us if you were part of a team or if you love the outdoors and the jewel we know as Forest Park. Announcement of the next BioBlitz will be made!

Check with your teacher - many are giving extra credit for attendance at this event as we will be discussing the many species in our region!

To be held in the St. Louis Zoo Living World auditorium and parking is free in the Zoo North Lot.

No need to RSVP. For more information call 314-533-8291 or email peggyn@academyofsciencestl.org

With thanks to:

 
Jan 29th, 2011 (Sat)
The Geography of Inequality: Historical Mapping with Colin Gordon
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Lecture and Book Signing

Books available in the Missouri History Museum shop.

Author and Featured Speaker: Colin Gordon, Ph.D., Professor and Chair, Department of History, University of Iowa; and author of, Mapping Decline: St. Louis and the Fate of the American City

Colin Gordon, professor of history at the University of Iowa, uses historical mapping to explore the geography of inequality in 20th- and 21st-century St. Louis. His 2008 book, Mapping Decline, traces the complicity of private real estate restrictions, local planning and zoning and federal housing policies in the "white flight" of people and wealth from the central city. And it traces the inadequacy-and often sheer folly-of a generation of urban renewal, in which even programs and resources aimed at eradicating blight in the city ended up encouraging flight to the suburbs. The urban crisis, as this study of St. Louis makes clear, is not just a consequence of economic and demographic change; it is also the most profound political failure of our recent history. Mapping Decline is the first history of a modern American city to combine extensive local archival research with the latest geographic information system (GIS) digital mapping techniques. More than 75 full-color maps-rendered from census data, archival sources, case law, and local planning and property records-illustrate, in often stark and dramatic ways, the still-unfolding political history of our neglected cities.

An interactive selection of maps is available at http://mappingdecline.lib.uiowa.edu

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Economics Series - Class: The Great Divide co-sponsored by:

 
Feb 2nd, 2011 (Wed)
Left Out in the Cold: The Story of the Barrow Global Climate Change Research Lab in Barrow, Alaska
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

CANCELED DUE TO ICE STORM

...to be rescheduled as part of the 2011-2012 Science Seminar Series. (Look for details on-line Summer 2011)

Janet Baum, AIA, Trustee, Academy of Science – St. Louis; retired founding partner of Health, Education + Research Associates, Inc.,; lead programmer and planner, Barrow Global Climate Change Research Lab

The Inupiat Native Americans (Eskimos) have continuously inhabited the North Slope of Alaska for 10,000 years. Just a few summers ago, the permanent Arctic sea ice pack was only a few hundred yards off the coastline of Alaska. Now it lies over one hundred miles away, and the gap is increasing. For the Inupiat, traversing this gap for subsistence hunting in sealskin canoes poses great risk.

Looking to find a way to provide steady occupations and income for their people (without resorting to oil drilling), the Inupiat commissioned the building of the Barrow, Alaska laboratory to study climate change. Through this, the Inupiat tribe is working to ensure their survival and preserve the Arctic landscape upon which they depend.

The project lead programmer and planner on this project, retired HERA founding partner Janet Baum, tells the remarkable story of place, people and environmental preservation in Left Out in the Cold.

All Seminars are held in The Living World (north side of Zoo)
Parking FREE in Zoo North Lot.

FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.

For more information call 314-533-8586 or email rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

 
Feb 9th, 2011 (Wed)
Stephen Hawking-- Right or Wrong? The Current Debate over God and the Origin of the Universe
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Michael McClymond, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Theology, Saint Louis University

The Big Bang, says world-renowned physicist, Stephen Hawking, in his new book, The Grand Design (2010), was the result of the laws of physics, and not the work of God. The question, he says, is whether or not the way the universe began was, “chosen by God for reasons we can’t understand, or was it determined by a law of science.” Dr. Hawking believes the second. Is he right? And how does his theory relate to the Big Bang Theory, which affirms t=0, or a first moment in the universe’s history? Saint Louis University professor and scientist-turned-theologian, Dr. Michael McClymond, shares his insights on the historical debates over God as cosmic Creator and the current state of scientific and theological discussion as he covers one of today’s most hotly debated issues in this fascinating look at, “The Current Debate over God and the Origin of the Universe.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue, Clayton, MO 63105

FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited.

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Feb 12th, 2011 (Sat)
The Cowry Collective
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Chinyere E. Oteh, founder, The Cowry Collective

Cowry Collective founder, Chinyere E. Oteh, discusses the Collective, a growing time bank in St. Louis that allows members to turn their time into money by making service exchanges with each other. Attendees will have the opportunity to become members.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Economics Series - Class: The Great Divide co-sponsored by:

 
Feb 13th, 2011 (Sun)
Academy of Science - St. Louis Science Fair - Honors Division
Time:

HONORS DIVISION - RESCHEDULED -Judges arrive at 9:30 am - Students arrive at 10:00 am

All Honors Division Students have been notified of the new date

Thank you to all judges! Judge Registration now open - Judges need to re-register

Open to students who have pre-registered.

For additional information, please contact Peggy James Nacke at 314-533-8291 or peggyn@academyofsciencestl.org

 
Feb 15th, 2011 (Tue)
The Majesty of the Osage
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Jim Duncan, past Director of the Missouri State Museum in Jefferson City

Before European colonization, Missouri was home to the most powerful Native American nation west of the Mississippi— the Osage. Today, the Osage remain a prominent and vital nation. Author, historian, and anthropologist, Jim Duncan covers the long history of the Osage in Missouri, the people, their arts, and how the Osage are keeping their heritage alive on their reservation in Oklahoma.

Presented in conjunction with the traveling exhibition, Splendid Heritage: Perspectives on American Indian Art on display at the Missouri History Museum, February 12, 2011 through April 30, 2011.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Perspectives on Science & History Series Co-sponsored by:

 
Feb 22nd, 2011 (Tue)
Congo’s Curious Chimps
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Crickette Sanz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Physical Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Washington University in Saint Louis

The lowland forests of the Congo Basin support an impressive array of primates, including the world's largest concentrations of great apes. Although Northern Republic of Congo has long been considered a stronghold for the conservation of central chimpanzees and western lowland gorillas, the fact is that these apes reside in a rapidly changing landscape. Most great ape populations in this region are likely to experience alteration of their habitat, the pressures of commercial bushmeat hunting, and/or emergence of disease. Due to these threats and a lack of knowledge of sympatric chimpanzees and gorillas, the Goualougo Triangle Ape Project was initiated in the forestry concession adjacent to the southern portion of the Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park.

Photos Credit: The Goualougo Triangle Ape Project

The widespread coexistence of central chimpanzees and western lowland gorillas has intrigued scientists for decades, but the details characterizing their relationship have remained elusive to field primatologists. The Goualougo Triangle is currently the only site in the lowland forests of the Congo Basin where one can directly observe both of these great apes within the same forest. In fact, researchers at the site have documented more inter-specific associations of these ape species than any other field study to-date. Field studies have also revealed a unique culture of complex tool using skills exhibited by chimpanzees in this region. Come hear about the Goualougo Triangle Ape Project’s efforts to promote the long-term conservation of both chimpanzees and gorillas through applied conservation research, enhanced protection of important ape populations and their habitats, and strengthening of local capacity to implement conservation programs.

Click here for more on the Goualougo Triangle Ape Project

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome. Registration not required.

All Conservation Conversations are held in the St. Louis Zoo Living World auditorium and parking is free in the Zoo North Lot.

For more information call 314-533-8586 - Note: no need to RSVP for this event.

Conservation Conversations are Co-sponsored by:

 
Feb 26th, 2011 (Sat)
Computer Science Field Trip - What is Looking Glass?
Time: 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Creating Interactive Stories with Looking Glass

Led by Caitlin Kelleher, PhD. Professor Kelleher joined Washington University in St. Louis in 2007 after her postdoctoral fellowship at Carnegie Mellon University. She worked throughout the summer months of 2000 in research and development at Walt Disney Imagineering.

Does your student have an interest in creating interactive, 3D stories on their computer? At this event, we will introduce students to Looking Glass: a freely available program for creating 3D movies with drag-and-drop programming. Students will learn about setting up a 3D scene, adding characters into that scene, making the characters do things to form a story, and creating custom character animations. By the end of the event, students can produce their own YouTube video from the stories they create.

Open to the first 20 Junior Academy students to RSVP

Registration closed - this event is full - stay tuned for future computer science events!

RSVP by e-mail to peggyn@academyofsciencestl.org

Parking and building instructions will be e-mailed back to attendees.

 
Mar 1st, 2011 (Tue)
Mother Nature’s Expert Witness: PhytoForensics-- How Plants Collect Evidence of Environmental Pollution
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Joel G. Burken, E.I.T., Ph.D., Professor of Civil, Architectural & Environmental Engineering; Interim Director, Environmental Research Center; and Coordinator, Environmental Engineering Undergraduate Program, Missouri University of Science & Technology; and Missouri S & T Students

Plants are intimately tied to their environment. They extract all that is needed to represent 99% of the world’s biomass. Collecting and storing chemicals and elements from the air, water, and soil, they are silent witnesses to acts of environmental contamination-- collecting and storing the surrounding environment’s unwanted pollutants and contaminants. The costs to investigate polluted sites, or detect an environment’s suspected contaminants are considerable. In the new field of PhytoForensics, novel analytic techniques are allowing us to rapidly, cheaply, and more accurately detect and remediate environmental pollutants to better our waters, our lands, and our health, with little or no ecological impact.

To be held at: Kirkwood High School Keating Theater, 801 West Essex, Kirkwood, MO 63122

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

FREE parking in high school lot.

STUDENT OPPORTUNITES TO COMPETE FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS— two $250 scholarships for middle and high school students. Attend 3 - 4 seminars or panel discussions and write about your experience. Scholarship decisions announced in May 2011.

DRAWINGS FOR TWO FREE JUNIOR SCIENCE ACADEMY MEMBERSHIPS at each Pioneering Science Seminar. -- Real-world science opportunities and field trips monthly— for students of all abilities in grades 6 - 12.

Pioneering Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Mar 2nd, 2011 (Wed)
Re-Energizing America: Renewable Energy Solutions for the Future... an energizing and lively talk and book signing
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Dan D. Chiras, Ph.D., Founder and Director, The Evergreen Institute; President, Sustainable Systems Design, Inc.; and nationally known author of more than two dozen books on green building, residential renewable energy and sustainability

Rising demand for oil and natural gas could cause devastating price increases and possibly result in major social, economic, and environmental disruptions. Evergreen Institute director and author, Dan Chiras, describes how we can avert disaster by turning to renewable energy now, talks about renewable energy’s potential to meet our needs, and how we can heat our homes, cook food, provide hot water and generate electricity via clean, affordable, and reliable renewable energy technologies.

Books available for signing and purchase after the talk.

All Seminars are held in The Living World (north side of Zoo)
Parking FREE in Zoo North Lot.

FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.

For more information call 314-533-8586 or email rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

 
Mar 4th, 2011 (Fri)
CSI Sparkles and Shines: Glitter as Forensic Evidence
Time: 7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Robert D. Blackledge, former Naval Criminal Investigative Service Senior Chemist, NCIS Regional Forensic Laboratory – San Diego; Fellow, American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Criminalistics Section; and editor, Forensic Analysis on the Cutting Edge: New Methods for Trace Evidence Analysis

Hair, fiber, paint chips, broken glass fragments, they are CSI’s familiar finger-pointing trace evidence. But glitter, with its widespread use in arts and crafts, on clothing, in cosmetics, and in numerous clear plastic commercial products, is the ideal contact trace evidence in crime scene investigations. Former NCIS Senior Chemist, Robert Blackledge, talks about glitter, what it is, how it’s made, and how it’s found and collected from crime scenes; and he wraps up with several brief case histories in this fascinating look at the forensic science of glitter.

Washington University in St. Louis
Danforth Campus, Laboratory Sciences Building, Room 300
St. Louis, MO 63130

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Junior Academy members, middle and high school students and teachers welcome and encouraged to attend.

Please note: This an open event, there will not be designated chaperones

No need to RSVP - For more information contact Jeff Cornelius at jeff.cornelius@principia.edu, or call 618-374-5296.

Sponsored by Academy of Science – St. Louis friend and partner, the St. Louis Section of the American Chemical Society www.stlacs.org.

 
Mar 10th, 2011 (Thu)
Conservation International's work in the Brazilian Amazon
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Patty Baiao, Director of Amazon Programs, Conservation International

Brown Bag Lunch Seminar (bring a lunch and drink)

Saint Louis Zoo Monsanto Lecture Theater (lower level Living World)

FREE and OPEN to HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS and ADULTS. Registration not required.

For this event, Parking: $12 in the Zoo North Lot, or FREE in Forest Park

Conservation International has been working in the Brazilian Amazon for over 10 years. The Amazon is the largest tropical forest in the world, harboring extraordinary biodiversity and providing essential ecosystem services, such as Carbon storage, for the entire world. This amazing forest is also home to over 20 million people. CI's work has focused on demonstrating that people need nature to thrive. They are creating green economies in the region to promote social and economic development while preserving the region's natural capital. To do that, Conservation International has a strong science-based approach with established partnerships at all levels, from local and traditional communities, to state governments and large corporations.

Conservation International Mission:

Building upon a strong foundation of science, partnership and field demonstration, Conservation International empowers societies to responsibly and sustainably care for nature, our global biodiversity, for the well-being of humanity.

About Patty Baiao’s Work:

Patty Baiao, a PhD graduate of the University of Missouri – St. Louis, has returned to her native Brazil where she leads conservation efforts from Belem, Brazil, located on the equator near the mouth of the Amazon. These efforts have been unbelievably successful in stopping rainforest destruction. They have created local interest groups consisting of all the local stakeholders from indigenous peoples to towns and cities, to large corporations. These multi-ethnic and multi-background groups come up with the communal land management plans that have not only stopped, but reversed the destruction of rainforest in much of Amazonia. They have also been very successful with trading carbon credits on the global market.

– Patty Parker, Des Lee Professor of Zoological Studies, University of Missouri – St. Louis; Fellow, Academy of Science – St. Louis

Conservation Conversations are Co-sponsored by:

 
Mar 11th, 2011 (Fri)
Bed Bugs: Getting Reacquainted with an Old Antagonist
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Richard Houseman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Entomology, Division of Plant Sciences, University of Missouri - Columbia

Bed bugs have been associated with humans since the beginning of civilization but many people born in the U.S. after 1960 had never seen a living bed bug until recently. There is a new resurgence of bed bug activity in the U.S. due to recent shifts in pesticide use, widespread travel, and urbanization. Urban entomologist, Dr. Richard M. Houseman, discusses the historical interactions and current challenges associated with this pesky, blood-sucking insect; examines issues surrounding the new epidemic; and covers the fascinating details of bed bug biology, feeding, and reproduction. You’ll learn how to prevent bringing bed bugs home and what to do if you find this unwanted guest living in your bed.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue, Clayton, MO 63105

FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited.

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Mar 22nd, 2011 (Tue)
Orangutan Conservation Research in Malaysia
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Harjinder Kler
Hutan

Hutan, a French grassroots non-profit organization, was founded in 1996 to develop and implement innovative and creative solutions to conserve the orangutan populations of Sabah, Malaysia.

Together with the Sabah Wildlife Department, Hutan established the Kinabatangan Orangutan Conservation Project (KOCP), employing upwards of 40 local community members. With their research it is now known that orangutans can live and thrive in secondary forest (that has been previously logged or disturbed) rather than solely in primary un-logged or disturbed forest. KOCP has received financial support from the Saint Louis Zoo.

Hutan also works to educate local villages, palm oil plantations and other agencies about the importance of rainforest and its inhabitants. By replanting areas of orangutan habitat they are re-establishing corridors for wildlife to safely travel within in the confines of the Lower Kinabatangan wildlife Sanctuary. In addition, Hutan employs Honorary Wildlife Wardens to patrol and monitor orangutan and elephant populations and aid with human-animal conflicts.

Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.

Parking is FREE in ZOO North Lot or in Forest Park.

Conservation Conversations are Co-sponsored by:

 
Mar 23rd, 2011 (Wed)
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

NOTE: Space is limited and we expect this program to fill up fast! Arrive early to guarantee your seat. Seat vouchers available at 5:30 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Presented in partnership with

Lecture and Book Signing

Science Writer, Best-Selling Author, and Featured Speaker: Rebecca Skloot

Science writer and best-selling author, Rebecca Skloot’s debut book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, took more than a decade to research and write, and instantly became a New York Times best-seller. In The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Skloot tells the story of a poor Southern tobacco farmer, Henrietta Lacks, whom scientists know as HeLa. Her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though Henrietta has been dead for nearly sixty years. HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the effects of the atom bomb; helped to lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions.

Join best-selling author, Rebecca Skloot, as she demonstrates how the story of the Lacks family is inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of, and the current debates over access to healthcare. She explores a wide spectrum of issues related to communication, research, legislation and policy in today’s modern scientific community, urges audiences to recognize the importance of adopting best practices in research and medicine, and discusses the ways in which effective communications can be used to bridge the gap between science and the general public.

Insightful Q & A with Dr. Danielle N. Lee follows.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Economics Series - Class: The Great Divide co-sponsored by:

 
Mar 28th, 2011 (Mon)
Darwin and Religion: Conflict versus Resolution
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Frank K. Flinn, Ph.D., adjunct Professor of Religious Studies in Arts & Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis

Explore the relationships between religion and the natural sciences from a historical perspective, with special emphasis on Darwin and contemporary issues raised by cosmology and evolutionary biology.

Washington University Professor of Religious Studies, Dr. Frank Flinn, describes the shift in science from the mechanical view of the universe (Galileo, Kepler, Newton) to the organic view (Hegel, Darwin). Briefly covering Darwin's and Wallace's discoveries and the first conflict between Samual Wilberforce, bishop of Oxford, and Thomas Huxley, Darwin's "bulldog," Dr. Flinn next moves on to the rise of Evangelical Fundamentalism and the literal interpretation of the Bible, leading to three stages of "faith-based science:"  Literal Biblicism, Creationism, and Intelligent Design.  He concludes with a discussion of the Dover Decision on the teaching of evolution in schools.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue, Clayton, MO 63105

FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited.

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Mar 29th, 2011 (Tue)
Patch-Burn Grazing: Is it Right for Missouri’s Remaining High Quality Prairies?
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Paul Nelson, Ecology and Land Management Planner, United States Forest Service

Paul Nelson talks about the implementation of patch-burn grazing (a rotational system alternating grazers such as bison or cattle and the use of prescribed fire) on tall grass prairies within Missouri, some of the last remaining fragments of a once dominant ecosystem, and discusses some of the successes and dangers associated with this management practice.

Patch-burn grazing, increasingly common on prairies throughout Missouri and the Midwest, is generally used to increase landscape heterogeneity. The result is a landscape that provides a variety of treatment types that theoretically allow for increased flora and fauna diversity.

As of 2009, this system is currently being applied by the Missouri Department of Conservation on 11 different prairies managed by the Department, representing 17% of MDC managed prairies. Included are several designated Natural Areas such as Niawathe and Taberville prairies. Patch-burn grazing's impact upon floral composition of the treated natural areas has been the source of much contention lately.

Paul Nelson is one of the premier ecologists in the State of Missouri and the author of, Terrestrial Natural Communities of Missouri, a classification system that describes Missouri's diverse ecosystems. Nelson has also served as lead illustrator of ten botanical books.

This program is presented as joint venture between the Saint Louis Zoo, Forest Park Forever, and the Missouri Native Plant Society

Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.

Parking is FREE in ZOO North Lot or in Forest Park.

Conservation Conversations are Co-sponsored by:

 
Mar 31st, 2011 (Thu)
Mysteries of the Dark Universe
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Rocky Kolb, Arthur Holly Compton Distinguished SErvice Professor of Astronomy & Astrophysics, University of Chicago.

Ninety-five percent of the universe is missing! Astronomical observations suggest that most of the mass of the universe is in a mysterious form called dark matter and most of the energy in the universe is in an even more mysterious form called dark energy. Unlocking the secrets of dark matter and dark energy will illuminate the nature of space and time and connect the quantum with the cosmos.

Open to the public with a special invitation to Academy of Science Junior Academy of Science Students. Junior Academy Students are invited to "meet and greet" the speaker!

Location:
Washington University in St. Louis
McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences
Whitaker Hall, Room 100

Junior Academy students RSVP to peggyn@academyofsciencestl.org to be included in the "meet and greet!"

 
Apr 6th, 2011 (Wed)
Squeaks and Scents: The Neurobiology of Animal Social Communication
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Timothy E. Holy, Ph.D., 2009 Outstanding St. Louis Scientist Innovation Award recipient, Academy of Science – St. Louis; Associate Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine

In attempting to understand animal communication, we are confronted by fundamental questions: What are the signals? What do they convey? How are they produced? How does the brain interpret these signals and use them to guide behavior? Scientists hope that studies of social communication in animals may lead to a better understanding of the natural world and of the brain itself.

Neurobiologist, Dr. Timothy Holy, gives us the inside scoop on the neurobiology of animal social communication, with an emphasis on two examples of communication among mice: chemical signals, often called pheromones, and “courtship songs” sung at frequencies too high to be detected by human ears.

All Seminars are held in The Living World (north side of Zoo)
Parking FREE in Zoo North Lot.

FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.

For more information call 314-533-8586 or email rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

 
Apr 8th, 2011 (Fri)
Saxon Transylvania: Lost World and Botanical Paradise - The Missouri Botanical Garden’s 2011 John Dwyer Lecture in Biology
Time: 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Dr. John R. Akeroyd, botanist, conservationist, and author of, The Historic Countryside of the Saxon Villages

Lecture and Book Signing

An expert on European plants, Dr. John Akeroyd is devoted to the promotion of sustainable farming and conservation of unique, plant-rich countryside. In the remote Saxon villages of southern Transylvania, it’s an older Europe where species-rich plant and animal communities thrive alongside traditional agriculture. Dr. Akeroyd offers compelling information on the agricultural systems of Transylvania, Romania and other European countries, covering sustainable farming in communities and plant usage, in supporting rural culture. And he talks about current projects that aim to conserve both biodiversity and the European farming communities that have been maintained for more than 800 years.

“I first visited Romania in June 2000. Within two hours, on my first walk, I knew I’d discovered the finest wildflower meadows in Europe.”
-- Dr. John Akeroyd

Since 1987, the Missouri Botanical Garden’s John Dwyer Lecture in Biology has been honoring the memory of Dr. John Dwyer (1915-2005), a professor of biology at St. Louis University for 32 years and former research associate of the Missouri Botanical Garden.

Missouri Botanical Garden Monsanto Center
4500 Shaw Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63110

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.

Parking is FREE in the Monsanto Center lot.

The Missouri Botanical Garden is located at 4344 Shaw Blvd. in St. Louis, just south of I-44 at Vandeventer-Kingshighway (exit #287B). Open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day except Dec. 25. Grounds open at 7 a.m. Wednesdays and Saturdays (exception: special admission rate events). Admission is $8; free children ages 12 and under and Garden members. St. Louis City and County residents are $4 and free Wednesdays and Saturdays until noon (exception: special admission rate events - third weekend of May, Labor Day weekend, and first weekend of October). Park for free on site and two blocks west at the Shaw-Vandeventer intersection. The Garden is easily accessible by taking the MetroLink commuter rail line to the Central West End station and picking up a Metro bus (www.metrostlouis.org). For general information, log on to www.mobot.org or call the 24-hour recording at (314) 577-9400 or 1 (800) 642-8842. For membership information, visit www.mobot.org/membership call (314) 577-5118 during weekday business hours. For volunteer opportunities, visit www.mobot.org/volunteer or call (314) 577-5187. The Missouri Botanical Garden is a tobacco-free environment.

 
Apr 13th, 2011 (Wed)
2011 Academy of Science - Outstanding Scientist Award Dinner
Time: 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM


2011 Outstanding St. Louis Scientist Awards
to be presented at the Awards Dinner
April 13, 2011 at the Chase Park Plaza

For Details call Kat Dockery 314-533-8586

 
Apr 16th, 2011 (Sat)
BioBlitz in Creve Coeur Park!
Time: 6:00 AM - 12:00 PM

The Academy of Science of St. Louis leads a baseline BioBlitz at Creve Coeur Park. This is a 6-hour, citizen science urban wildlife flash exploration and inventory of the biodiversity of Park’s plant and animal life. This is the Park’s first BioBlitz. Teams of public volunteers led by biologists, naturalists and environmental enthusiasts search natural areas within the park, listing as many different species as they can find. At the end of the day, participants have a new appreciation of one of St. Louis’ most treasured parks.http://academyofsciencestl.org/initiatives/bioblitz/creve_coeur_park/

 
Apr 19th, 2011 (Tue)
Looking for Life Beyond Earth
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Pamela Gay, Ph.D., Assistant Research Professor, Southern Illinois University - Edwardsville; astronomer, writer, and podcaster. Astronomy Cast, www.AstronomyCast.com

Jodie Foster's character in the movie Contact, considers a universe without life "an awful waste of space." Many scientists agree with this rather non-scientific statement; and today, telescopes around the world, on the surface and in orbit, look for signs of life in space. Some of these searches are remarkably close to home--Future Mars missions are designed to look for signs of life on the Red Planet. The planetary science community is seeking funding to look for life under the ice of Jupiter's moon, Europa. Even Saturn's hazy moon Titan may be a possible home for bacterial biology. While all these not-too-distant worlds may possess evidence of past or present life, we know they aren't host to intelligent life like our own. To find that, we need to look outward, searching for signs of life on planets orbiting alien stars. Astronomer Dr. Pamela Gay tells us how scientists decide where to look for life, talks about the techniques they use, and how we guess at the probability of actually finding--Life Beyond Earth.

Learn more about Dr. Gay by visiting her blog at http://www.StarStryder.com

Photos: © Pamela Gay

To be held at:

Kirkwood High School Keating Theater
801 West Essex
Kirkwood, MO 63122

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

FREE parking in high school lot.

STUDENT OPPORTUNITES TO COMPETE FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS— two $250 scholarships for middle and high school students. Attend 3 - 4 seminars or panel discussions and write about your experience. Scholarship decisions announced in May 2011.

DRAWINGS FOR TWO FREE JUNIOR SCIENCE ACADEMY MEMBERSHIPS at each Pioneering Science Seminar. Junior Academy of Science-- Real-world science opportunities and field trips monthly— for students of all abilities in grades 6 - 12.

Pioneering Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Apr 19th, 2011 (Tue)
Artifacts, Rock Art Imagery, and the Cosmos
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Carol Diaz-Granados, Ph.D., Research Associate and lecturer, Department of Anthropology, Washington University in St. Louis

American Indian Art focuses on the beautiful and enigmatic arts and artifacts of America's first peoples. These arts include pottery, metalwork, shellwork, and rock art. Anthropologist and archaeologist, Dr. Carol Diaz-Granados, shows a variety of American Indian artifacts, their counterparts in the rock art record, and offers interpretations of meaning gathered from the ethnographic records.

Presented in conjunction with the travelling exhibition, Splendid Heritage: Perspectives on American Indian Art on display at the Missouri History Museum, February 12, 2011 through April 30, 2011.
For more on Splendid Heritage, visit http://www.mohistory.org/node/5265

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – AT&T Room
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Perspectives on Science & History Series Co-sponsored by:

 
Apr 21st, 2011 (Thu)
I Forgot to Pick up the Milk: Some Surprising Findings on Memory and Aging, and Strategies for Improving Memory Seminar and book signing
Time: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Mark McDaniel, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology in Arts & Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis and author, Prospective Memory and Memory Fitness: A Guide for Successful Aging

A forgotten telephone number, a familiar face and a name you can’t recall, remembering to pay a due bill, or pick up bread on the way home, remembering the way home-- do I remember the way home? Memory is central to our daily lives. Lapses in memory can be distressing, and some-- potentially alarming. Do all adults experience memory difficulties as they age? What is the difference between normal memory change and the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease? Is it possible to stem, or even reverse memory decline? Washington University psychologist and memory expert, Dr. Mark McDaniel provides insight into what the scientific research suggests will happen to our memory capabilities as we age, explores the memory challenges we all face as we grow older, and offers the layperson suggestions and strategies for improving memory.

Don’t forget to join us for a fascinating look at memory and aging. Copies of Memory Fitness: A Guide for Successful Aging, are available for purchase and signing by the author.

To be held at:
Kirkwood OASIS - Kirkwood Community Center
111 South Geyer Road, St. Louis, MO 63122

FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited.

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Apr 23rd, 2011 (Sat)
The Moral Underground: How Ordinary Americans Subvert an Unfair Economy
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Author and Featured Speaker: Lisa Dodson, Ph.D., Research Professor, Department of Sociology, Boston College

A manager at a chain pizza restaurant pads his minimum-wage employees paychecks; a supervisor at a big box store secretly sends groceries home with a worker, who despite having a full-time job, can't afford to feed her family; a pediatrician fudges an insurance form to get… care for the uninsured mother of her patient. Based on research about hidden resistance to an economy that harms millions of working families, The Moral Underground, is a fascinating look at civil disobedience by teachers, supervisors, health-care professionals and managers who bend the rules—and even break the law—to support those in need. Dodson discusses economic disobedience, her take on the moral paradox of breaking rules to do good, and why she believes it is in the tradition of the underground railroad and other acts of civil disobedience that have propelled social justice movements throughout history.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Economics Series - Class: The Great Divide co-sponsored by:

 
May 3rd, 2011 (Tue) -- May 7th, 2011 (Sat)
Academy of Science - St. Louis Science Fair
Time:

Academy of Science - St. Louis Science Fair to be held at Queeny Park. Top students from local fairs will be recommended by their school to compete at the regional fair for ribbons and over $50,000 in special awards and scholarships!

Visit Academy of Science - St. Louis Science Fair website for details!

 
May 10th, 2011 (Tue)
Among Giants, A Life with Whales - Talk and Book Signing
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Charles "Flip" Nicklin, Marine Biologist

Widely regarded as the world’s leading cetacean photographer, Flip Nicklin, grew up around his father’s small dive shop on the California coast. In 1976, he was signed on as a deckhand and diving assistant for a three-month shoot with photographers Bates Littlehales and Jonathan Blair. He went on to become National Geographic’s premiere whale photographer and marine mammal specialist. Over the last quarter century Flip has photographed more than thirty species of whales and dolphins, some so endangered their very survival is in question. His ability to free dive to depths of up to 90 feet (27 meters) allows him to swim near enough to record whale behavior without interrupting it. In 2001 he co-founded Whale Trust, a non-profit organization dedicated to research and public education.

The mission of Whale Trust is to promote, support, and conduct scientific research on whales and the marine environment and develop public education programs based directly on results of scientific research. Whale Trust is committed to promoting and fostering Maui as a unique living laboratory for whale research and the marine environment. For information, please visit http://www.whaletrust.org

Publications include:

Among Giants, A Life with Whales – This is an adventure story, a coming-of-age story, a scientific story, and most of all, a story about the most remarkable creatures on the plant – whales. Face to Face with Whales - You slip over the side of your boat, descending deep into the dark realm of the Earth’s largest creature. Then the whale starts to sing, just feet away from you. You record the sounds, hoping one day to understand their language. Their music is a rare glimpse of this majestic mammal’s unknown world. Photographer Flip Nicklin brings you face to face with whales as they communicate, nurse their young, and surface dramatically for air. Meet these intelligent, social creatures in their natural habitat; learn of the different kinds of whales, from humpbacks to belugas; discover how we can aid their recovery from years of overhunting; and how we can protect their environment.

All Seminars are held in The Living World (north side of Zoo)
Parking FREE in Zoo North Lot.

FREE & OPEN to ALL. Registration not required.

For more information call 314-533-8586 or email rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

Explorers Club St. Louis

 
May 21st, 2011 (Sat)
Black Wealth/White Wealth: A New Perspective on Racial Inequality
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Lecture and Book Signing

Author and Featured Speaker: Melvin L. Oliver, Ph.D., SAGE Sara Miller McCune Dean of Social Sciences and Professor of Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara

An expert on racial and urban inequality and poverty, Dr. Oliver is the co-author (with Thomas M. Shapiro) of Black Wealth/White Wealth: A New Perspective on Racial Inequality. In this fascinating look at wealth in America—how assets are created, expanded and preserved—a deep economic divide emerges between blacks and whites. Dr. Oliver demonstrates how an analysis of private wealth uncovers a revealing story about race in our country.

Lecture at 1:00 pm

Book Signing at 2:00 pm

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Economics Series - Class: The Great Divide co-sponsored by:

 
May 28th, 2011 (Sat)
The Physics and Chemistry of the Nuclear Disaster at Fukushima
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Featured Speaker: Lee G. Sobotka, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Chemistry and Physics, Washington University in St. Louis

On March 11, Japan received two insults from mother nature: an earthquake measuring 9.0 on the Richter scale and a tsunami measuring over 40 feet. As the primary and main back-up safety systems at the first (Dai-ichi) nuclear power station in Fukushima failed to keep three reactors and at least one spent fuel pond cool, a man-made nuclear disaster ensued. Washington University Chemistry and Physics Professor, Lee Sobotka, covers the physical science issues and presents the chemistry and physics of this third disaster. Learn how power plants are supposed to work, what went wrong and what must be done to mitigate the toxic and lethal consequences of this still unfolding tragedy.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Parking in Washington University Lots or metered on Brookings Drive

Space is limited.

Washington University in St. Louis
Crow Hall, Room 201
One Brookings Drive
St. Louis, MO 63130
(east end of campus directly north of Brookings Hall)

No need to RSVP for this event

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Jun 18th, 2011 (Sat)
The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Lecture and Book Signing

Author and Featured Speaker: Isabel Wilkerson, Director, Narrative Non-fiction and Professor of Journalism, College of Communication, Boston University; former New York Times Chicago Bureau Chief and 1st black woman Pulitzer Prize winning feature writer

A New York Times 10 Best Books of 2010

Lecture at 1:00 pm

Book Signing at 2:00 pm

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Economics Series - Class: The Great Divide co-sponsored by:

 
Jun 21st, 2011 (Tue)
From Slavery to Hip Hop: Culture, Controversy, and the Politics of Language
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: John Baugh, Ph.D., Margaret Bush Wilson Professor in Arts & Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis; Professor Emeritus of Education and Linguistics, Stanford University

The linguistic consequences of slavery are described, including the educational controversy surrounding Ebonics, a term that was first coined in St. Louis. The discussion explores the emerging global influence of Hip Hop among youth throughout the world. African American oral traditions are also introduced, culminating with some of the inspirational speeches that have been delivered by Michelle and Barak Obama.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

 
Jun 28th, 2011 (Tue)
Adventures in Medicine!
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Have you thought about Medicine as a career? Maybe you would just like to find out more. Join us at the Saint Louis University Anatomy Lab for Pig Heart Dissection. The AIMS (Adventures in Medicine and Science) Program is a component of Practical Anatomy and Surgical Education in St. Louis University's School of Medicine - Center for Anatomic Science and Education. Cost is minimal at $15 each.

(Free to Junior Academy Gateway members!)

REGISTRATION IS CLOSED - THIS EVENT IS FULL

RSVP by June 23rd

Earn 25 achievement points

IMPORTANT: Lab attire required - no open toe shoes or sandals are permitted in the laboratory.

Open to Junior Academy members only

Send e-mail RSVP to peggyn@academyofsciencestl.org

We will e-mail your confirmation with map back to you

 
Jun 30th, 2011 (Thu)
A Big Muddy Adventure: Maple Island Canoe Expedition
Time: 8:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Program:
8:00 AM Audubon Migratory Birds and Wildlife Workshop
(Audubon Center at Riverlands)
9:15 AM Canoe Launch

Just downstream a short stretch from the Alton Lock and Dam is Maple Island, part of the Riverlands Migratory Bird Sanctuary. Accessible only by water, this unique and historic river island ecosystem still retains its natural state. Flocks of migratory birds use the island and its backwaters and wetlands as a resting place and hunting grounds. Join us, along with River Guides and Paddlers, for a Big Muddy Adventure as we canoe the Mighty Mississippi in 30-foot-long handmade canoes.

Cost: $35 per person.
Snacks and beverages provided.
Registration required.
Limited to 20 participants: 1st 10 OASIS and 1st 10 Academy of Science – STL.
Call 314-533-8586 or email rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org.

Note: rain date reschedule if needed.

REGISTRATION CLOSED - THIS EVENT IS FULL

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Jul 7th, 2011 (Thu)
Symbols of Power: From Crowns to Veiled Prophet Gowns
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Panel Discussion

Knowledgable facilitrainers from the National Conference for Community and Justice of Metropolitan St. Louis examine intersections of race and class in popular symbols.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Economics Series - Class: The Great Divide co-sponsored by:

 
Jul 8th, 2011 (Fri)
French Explorers: Early St. Louis History
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Jim Jordan, Senior Coordinator Continuing Education, University of Missouri - St. Louis

Immerse yourself in a time of French explorers in the wild land that would become St. Louis. Experience an interpretive lecture about Marquette and Joliet and the lifestyle of these explorers. How did they avoid the evil Manitou that inhabited the Mississippi River in Missouri? Why was St Louis so important in the early fur trade? Which countries had political jurisdiction over St Louis? Come and discover our rich French and fur trade connections through stories and song along with a Mercantile Library docent program that examines the fur trading post that developed into St. Louis.

To be held at:
University of Missouri - St. Louis
J. C. Penny Conference Center, Room 126
One University Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63121

Space is limited

FREE to the first 10 registrants, $12 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited.

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Jul 15th, 2011 (Fri)
A Big Muddy Adventure: Maple Island Canoe Expedition
Time: 8:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Disappointed you missed the boat? June's Maple Island Canoe Expedition filled fast, so we've scheduled a second Big Muddy Adventure. Sign up early to reserve your spot!

Program:
8:00 AM Audubon Migratory Birds and Wildlife Workshop
(Audubon Center at Riverlands)
9:15 AM Canoe Launch

Just downstream a short stretch from the Alton Lock and Dam is Maple Island, part of the Riverlands Migratory Bird Sanctuary. Accessible only by water, this unique and historic river island ecosystem still retains its natural state. Flocks of migratory birds use the island and its backwaters and wetlands as a resting place and hunting grounds. Join us, along with River Guides and Paddlers, for a Big Muddy Adventure as we canoe the Mighty Mississippi in 30-foot-long handmade canoes.

Cost: $35 per person.
Snacks and beverages provided.
Registration required.
Limited to 20 participants: 1st 10 OASIS and 1st 10 Academy of Science – STL.
Call 314-533-8586 or email rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org.

Note: rain date reschedule if needed.

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Jul 19th, 2011 (Tue)
Cognitive Changes in Healthy Aging and Early Stage Alzheimer’s Disease
Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Featured Speaker:  David Balota, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Neurology, Department of Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis

Washington University Psychology and Neurology Professor, Dr. David Balota, covers recent advances in our understanding of the changes that occur in memory and attention in both healthy aging and early stage Alzheimer's disease.  He talks about the underlying neural changes that appear to account for these changes and provides an overview of possible lifestyle factors that appear to mitigate changes in memory and attention.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue, Clayton, MO 63105

FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited.

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Jul 20th, 2011 (Wed)
Spontaneous Challenge: Exploring Architecture!
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Led by Janet Baum, AIA, Harvard Instructor, Lecturer at Washington University, Sam Fox School of Architecture and Trustee, Academy of Science-St. Louis, students will design and build their own structure with materials provided!

Friendly competition and prizes for all!

Photo Credit: Thomas Winkler

Architecture careers combine art and science into the design of spaces and environments. Architects determine needs for buildings and structures, and transform them into concepts for designs. Join us for this hands-on afternoon of design as you explore the possibilities of a career in Architecture. Janet has managed projects all over the world and co-authored Guidelines for Laboratory Design: Health and Safety Considerations.

Free!

Open to Junior Academy members

Registration closed - this event is full

 
Aug 5th, 2011 (Fri)
Star Party & Geocaching - Overnight at Shaw Nature Reserve!
Time: 6:00 PM - 9:00 AM

The STAR PARTY is an annual favorite! Junior Academy students and their families (over age 7) will be welcomed with a bar-b-q followed by Geocaching & a night hike! Rich Hauermann, Administrative Officer, Washington University Earth and Planetary Science, the St. Louis Astronomical Society and NASA Missouri Space Grant Consortium, will provide an overview of the night sky followed by telescope viewing. Be prepared to stay up late. Let's hope for good weather and a clear sky!
Photo Credit: NASA

Cost is minimal at $30 each - includes:
*Welcome bar-b-q
*Geocaching (GPS & Treasurers provided!)
*Night in historic log cabin*"Night Sky" program and telescope viewing
*Snacks
*Continental breakfast

Note: All students need to be accompanied by at least one adult

Registration closed - this event is full

 
Aug 23rd, 2011 (Tue)
Personal Finance: The Building Blocks of Financial Security
Time: 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Dr. Sharon Laux, Associate Director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Education in the Department of Economics at the University of Missouri--St. Louis, discusses strategies to take control of your financial situation and rebuild for the future

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Economics Series - Class: The Great Divide co-sponsored by:

 
Aug 30th, 2011 (Tue)
Across the Divide: Navigating the Digital Revolution as a Woman, Entrepreneur and CEO
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

-- lecture and book signing

Featured Speaker: Susan S. Elliott, Founder & Chair, SSE, Inc., and author, Across the Divide: Navigating the Digital Revolution as a Woman, Entrepreneur and CEO

Hear the story of a pioneering woman who got in on the ground floor of the digital revolution to become one of its leaders!

In 1958 Susan Elliott joined IBM as one of the company’s first female programmers. Forced to leave in 1966 when she became pregnant, she founded technology and education firm SSE, Inc., in the midst of a decade that was known for innovative technology, but not for women leaders in the field.

Today, St. Louis-based SSE is one of the fastest growing technology and education firms in mid-America, recognized globally for its work in the fields of eLearning, blended learning, network infrastructure and technology management services.

Meet Ms. Elliott, hear her story, and have the opportunity to buy a signed copy of her new book, Across the Divide: Navigating the Digital Revolution as a Woman, Entrepreneur and CEO, following the presentation.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue, Clayton, MO 63105

FREE, but REGISTRATION REQUIRED. When registering, please state that you are a member or friend of the Academy of Science – St. Louis. Call 314-539-4556 to register. Space is limited.

OPEN to ALL ACADEMY MEMBERS and FRIENDS, students and JUNIOR ACADEMY members.

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Sep 17th, 2011 (Sat)
Waiting for "Superman"
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Film

Davis Guggenheim's documentary explores the tragic ways in which the American public education system is failing our nation's children, and explores the roles that charter schools and education reformers could play in offering hope for the future.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Economics Series - Class: The Great Divide co-sponsored by:

 
Sep 22nd, 2011 (Thu)
Grevy’s Zebra Trust
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Belinda Low, MSc, Certified Educator in Holistic Management; co-founder and Executive Director, Grevy’s Zebra Trust
Belinda Low with Samburu elder. Photo by Kim Diment

The exceptional Grevy’s zebra is uniquely adapted to survive in the harsh arid and semi-arid climates of northern Kenya and Ethiopia. It is one of Africa’s most endangered large mammals, declining over the last three decades from 15,000 to fewer than 2,500.

In response to this decline, the Grevy’s Zebra Trust was established in 2007. The Trust’s co-founder and Executive Director, Belinda Low, talks about the current status of the Grevy’s zebra and the work being done to enhance its survival in partnership with local communities. An indicator of declining ecosystem health, its survival and the future of pastoralist livelihoods are inextricably linked. Ms. Low reflects on the growing community spirit for conserving the Grevy’s zebra and tracks the innovative work of the local people in safeguarding this extraordinary species from extinction.

Zebra Photo/s courtesy, Saint Louis Zoo

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations is Co-sponsored by:

 
Sep 23rd, 2011 (Fri)
Creeks & Squeaks! A two-part adventure in Forest Park!
Time: 5:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Junior Academy members join scientists/enthusiasts and endangered species biologists for an Evening of Adventure!

Join CH2MHILL, an international engineering, construction, and operations firm, in increasing awareness of water quality issues through support of World Water Monitoring Day. Geologists, engineers and other scientists will be on hand to discuss the significance of the sampling. We will use different methods to collect the data, and discuss important scientific concepts such as accuracy, precision and reproducibility of the results.

CH2MHILL designed many aspects of the new waterways throughout the Forest Park and established water quality objectives and best practices to improve the water quality of the park and enhance the biodiversity of the system. Testing kits provided.

Join the hunt for endangered bats in Forest Park!
An Endangered Species Biologist, Bree McMurray, from Missouri Department of Transportation and Shelly Colatskie from Missouri Department of Conservation will catch bats and teach students the tricks of navigating in the dark and hunting by sound. You may even get to help hoist the huge net! SPACE IS LIMITED - RSVP EARLY

 
Sep 29th, 2011 (Thu)
Fire and Ice: The Impact of Comets on Life
Time: 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Tour the Tables in the Lobby outside the Theater from 6 PM - 7 PM and Visit with...
Reps from Community Organizations to learn about Summer and other Science Opportunities for Students.

7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Featured Speaker: Erika Gibb, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri – St. Louis

Comets—they’ve often gotten a bad rap—film and science fiction novels portray doomsday impact scenarios of death and destruction, and within the last century, at least three fireball impacts are reported to have caused significant damage on the ground. They may indeed have caused catastrophic destruction and they may yet again, but could they also be the reason there is life here on our planet? Comets carry the ingredients for life and they may have delivered them to the ancient Earth.

University of Missouri – St. Louis astrobiologist, Dr. Erika Gibb discusses how comets are studied, what we know about them, what contributions they may have made to Earth’s oceans and biosphere, and what we still have to learn.

Photo: W. M. Keck Observatory, Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

Photos courtesy of Dr. Erika Gibb.

Presented in partnership with the University of Missouri - St. Louis

STUDENT OPPORTUNITES TO COMPETE FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS— two $250 scholarships for middle and high school students. Attend 3 - 4 seminars or panel discussions and write about your experience. Scholarship decisions announced in May 2011.

DRAWINGS FOR TWO FREE JUNIOR SCIENCE ACADEMY MEMBERSHIPS at each Pioneering Science Seminar. Junior Academy of Science-- Real-world science opportunities and field trips monthly— for students of all abilities in grades 6 - 12.

Location: Kirkwood High School Keating Theater, 801 West Essex,
Kirkwood, MO 63122
FREE parking in Kirkwood High School lots.

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

Pioneering Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Oct 5th, 2011 (Wed)
Green Home Tour
Time: 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Jim Jordan, Senior Coordinator Continuing Education, University of Missouri – St. Louis; Director for Educational Outreach, Show Me Solar

Begin the morning at the Missouri Botanical Garden where Show Me Solar Educational Outreach Director, Jim Jordan, interprets the Garden’s energy conservation exhibits. Then we’re off to visit two solar homes: a newly constructed home that incorporated sustainability with universal accessibility design, and an older brick house that has been retrofitted for solar and other sustainability aspects. End with lunch, on your own, at the Garden’s own Sassafras Cafe, the first certified Green Restaurant in the state of Missouri.

Meet at the Missouri Botanical Garden
4344 Shaw Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63110

COST: $25 per person (includes Garden exhibits and transportation to and from homes on tour) OPEN to ALL. REGISTRATION REQUIRED. Registration deadline is Thursday, September 29. Call 314-533-8586 or email rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org.

Green Energy Series co-sponsors:

and

 
Oct 5th, 2011 (Wed)
Plants as Medicines: From Obsolete to Leading Edge
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Wendy Applequist, PhD, Assistant Curator, William L. Brown Center, Missouri Botanical Garden

For most of human history, the words “medicine” and “herb” have been virtually synonymous. Today, although traditional botanical medicines are sometimes scorned as old-fashioned, scientific studies increasingly demonstrate their value — though consumers often have no clear way to judge a medicinal product’s quality. Plants also serve as sources of pharmaceutical drugs; unfortunately, it is certain that lifesaving compounds not yet discovered will be forever lost to humanity through the extinction of thousands of species in the next century. Missouri Botanical Garden botanist, Wendy Applequist, covers the past, present, and future contributions of plants to human health and well-being in this fascinating look at Plants as Medicine.

Photo: Sutherlandia frutescens (cancerbush), a South African plants used by AIDS patient

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Science Seminar Series is Co-sponsored by:

 
Oct 8th, 2011 (Sat)
The Impact and Contributions of the Latino Market in the U.S. Economy
Time: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

PROGRAM:
1 - 4 PM Speakers & Q&A
4 - 5 PM Dance Performance

In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, Belas Artes Latino Legacy Project presents a cultural, educational, and entertaining event with offerings by leaders and authorities from governmental, educational, and business sectors regarding Latinos and the U.S. economy. Wrapping up the afternoon is the musical Musica Caliente, featuring professional musicians and dancers performing the five different styles of Latin music and dance featured on the U.S. Postal Service’s 2011 stamps honoring legendary performers of the Latin sound.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – MacDermott Grand Hall and Bank of Ameirca Atrium Foyer
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Economics Series - Class: The Great Divide co-sponsored by:

 
Oct 10th, 2011 (Mon)
Giving Back
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Even if you've never sewn before, you can participate in national service by making a quilt for a combat veteran. A "coach" will take you under her wing, bringing her sewing machine and other equipment and helping you every step of the way. She'll do the cutting, pinning, and pressing, guiding you as you make easy patchwork blocks.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Bank of Ameirca Atrium Foyer
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Economics Series - Class: The Great Divide co-sponsored by:

 
Oct 10th, 2011 (Mon)
Money, Myths & Man-Eaters: Researching Carnivore Ecology and Conflict in Tanzania’s Ruaha Landscape
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Amy Dickman, PhD, Kaplan Senior Research Fellow in Field Conservation, Oxford University; 2009 Courvoisier Future 500 “Top 50” Young People in Science & Education

Photo: Amy Dickman and Barabaig warriors

Following her Masters and PhD work on human-carnivore conflict supported by the Saint Louis Zoo’s WildCare Institute and with more than 13 years experience working with large carnivores in Africa, specializing in big cats, Amy Dickman established the Ruaha Carnivore Project in 2009 in Tanzania. The Ruaha landscape is one of the most important areas in the world for lions, leopards and cheetahs, and the Saint Louis Zoo is still supporting Amy and her Tanzanian team as they research the ecology of these vital populations, and work to reduce the pressing threat of human-carnivore conflict in this critical area. Amy helped create the Global Cheetah Action Plan, the Regional Conservation Strategies for cheetahs and African wild dogs in Eastern and Southern Africa, and National Action Plans for cheetahs and other carnivores in Kenya, Tanzania and Southern Sudan.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations is Co-sponsored by:

 
Oct 11th, 2011 (Tue)
Innovations in Conservation: Planning for Natural Diversity in Urban Environments
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Angie Weber, MS, Community Conservation Planner, Missouri Department of Conservation

Photo: Operation Brightside Demonstration Garden

Finding ways to live with nature is an ever-increasing challenge today, especially in urban areas. The Missouri Department of Conservation’s Community Conservation Team, comprised of regional conservation department staff, educates developers, consultants and local government representatives about the social, environmental and economic impacts of common development practices and the benefits of the alternatives. In order to help people in urban areas connect with nature in their everyday lives, encourage resource-friendly development, and cultivate natural diversity, the Missouri Conservation Department promotes community conservation. Join Community Conservation Planner, Angie Weber as she demonstrates projects, planning, and funding opportunities that restore natural diversity in the St. Louis area-- opportunities that can be used in areas before, during, and after development.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations is Co-sponsored by:

 
Oct 12th, 2011 (Wed)
What Counts as Scientific Evidence? or, How a Medical Article on Pentecostal Healing in Africa Kicked Over the Hornets’ Nest
Time: 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Michael McClymond, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Theology, Saint Louis University

In 2009, Dr. Michael McClymond from Saint Louis University went as part of a three-person faculty team—including a neuroscientist, an historian, and a theologian—to Mozambique Africa to investigate claims that the Pentecostal laying-on-of-hands and prayer for the sick was effective in bringing about sudden, dramatic improvements in vision and hearing in many cases. When their study showed positive results, and their findings found their way into a peer-reviewed medical journal article, there was international media interest that stretched from Toronto to India and Indonesia. A firestorm of criticism also erupted online from skeptics who held that these results could not possibly have been genuine. Can prayer have a measurable impact on healing? And what should or should not count as scientific evidence in favor of such a claim? You won’t want to miss this investigative look at the healing power of prayer.

Copies of the peer-reviewed journal article will be available for participants.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue, Clayton, MO 63105

FREE to the first 10 registrants (free spots full).
Cost is $9 per person. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited.

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Oct 13th, 2011 (Thu)
Snapshot in Time: Geologic Secrets of the Danville, Illinois, Fossilized Forest
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Scott D. Elrick, Geologist, Illinois State Geological Survey

A 300-million-year-old Carboniferous fossilized forest discovery opens a wide window into the past. It’s a rare opportunity for an up-close look at this rare find preserved in the roof of an underground coal mine near the town of Danville, Illinois. The forest, covering approximately 25 square kilometers, is probably the largest intact rainforest from the Pennsylvanian Period ever to be discovered; and its sheer size affords an unprecedented view of ancient forest life.

Illinois State Geological Survey geologist, Scott Elrick, showcases a photographic array of some of the rainforest’s beautifully preserved and somewhat bizarre plants, many of which are extinct today. From the exposures of plants and their encapsulating geology, a great deal can be learned about the ancient environmental conditions in which they formed and the coal that they left behind. Elrick talks about the geology of this amazing underground discovery and discusses the tectonic and climatic factors that made these conditions possible.

Location: Belleville East High School Performing Arts Center

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

Belleville East High School Performing Arts Center, 2555 West Boulevard, Belleville, IL 62221

Parking is FREE in school lot.

NABT Biology Club Series co-sponsors:

 
Oct 14th, 2011 (Fri)
Lowell Thomas Science Symposium
Time: 4:00 PM - 9:00 PM

4:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Exploring the World’s Greatest Mysteries
Symposium Cost: $25 adults, $10 students
Academy of Science of St. Louis friend and partner, The Explorers Club, presents Lowell Thomas Science Symposium -- The symposium will be moderated by Robert R. Archibald, Ph.D., with the 2011 Lowell Thomas Awardees making presentations followed by a Q&A panel discussion. Read more

7:00 pm -9:00 pm Reception
Cost: $70 for both Symposium and reception

Advanced Reservation required.

 
Oct 15th, 2011 (Sat)
The Explorers Club Lowell Thomas Awards Dinner
Time: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

For the first time, the venerable international Explorers Club will present its prestigious Lowell Thomas awards in St. Louis at a gala dinner on October 15. The awards, established in honor of the journalist and broadcaster who made Lawrence of Arabia famous, have been given in New York since their establishment in 1980.

The St. Louis Academy of Science and the St. Louis chapter of the Explorers Club are co-sponsors of the event. Titled “Exploring the World’s Greatest Mysteries,” the festivities will take place from October 14-16. The awards dinner and a scientific symposium are open to the public. “Considering the nearby discovery of Cahokia Mounds, and St. Louis’ role as home base for the Lewis and Clark Expedition, the city is a fitting location for our first awards dinner outside of New York, “ said Lorie Karnath, president of the Explorers Club and Rolex Watch, USA.

Members of the Explorers Club, founded in 1904 by illustrious explorers of the time, have accomplished a number of ‘firsts.’ Among them are firsts to both north and south poles, first to the summit of Mount Everest, and first to the surface of the moon. Read more

6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
The Lowell Thomas Dinner
Cost: see website for ticket levels
Dinner attire is black tie or native dress. The Master of Ceremonies will be the Club’s Honorary Chairman, Jim Fowler MED’66.

Advanced Reservation required.

 
Oct 18th, 2011 (Tue)
Reclaiming and Recycling Textiles: A Zero-Waste Goal
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Jana Hawley, Ph.D., Professor and Department Chair, Textile and Apparel Management, University of Missouri - Columbia; President, International Textiles and Apparel Association (ITAA); Advisor, International Textile Recycling Conference; Board Member, Council for Textile Recycling

The textile recycling industry is one of the oldest and most established recycling industries in the world; yet few people understand the industry, its myriad players, or reclaimed textile products in general. Throughout the world, post-consumer textile and apparel products are salvaged as reclaimed textiles and put to new value-added uses. This ‘hidden’ industry diverts over 2.5 billion pounds of textiles annually, yet nearly 80% of the waste still goes to landfills even though textile waste is nearly 100 per cent recyclable. Theoretically, textiles will decompose and in comparison to other waste, leave little toxic leachate or bio-gas during the decomposition process. More attention needs to be given to ways in which waste management, textile recycling companies, and consumers can help divert textiles from the landfill. A goal of zero-waste by 2035 has been established by the Council of Textile Recycling. This presentation will focus on the industry, value-added products, and strategies to accomplish the zero-waste plan.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in conjunction with, the Missouri History Museum gallery exhibition, Woven in Time, on display at the Museum September 12, 2011 - August 12, 2012.

 
Oct 21st, 2011 (Fri)
From Sunbeams to Electricity: Solar Photo Voltaic
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

CANCELED - Please check calendar for other upcoming science events

Featured Speaker: Jim Jordan, Senior Coordinator Continuing Education, University of Missouri – St. Louis; Director for Educational Outreach, Show Me Solar

Today, solar electricity is an economically viable energy source for corporations, education institutions and residents and is often showcased as the energy source of the future. Explore the what, where, when, why and how of this unlimited source of clean energy with some hands-on demonstrations and discussion.

To be held at
University of Missouri - St. Louis
J. C. Penney Conference Center
One University Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63121

FREE and OPEN to ALL. REGISTRATION REQUIRED. Call 314-533-8586 or email rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org. Space is limited.

Green Energy Series co-sponsors:

and

 
Oct 23rd, 2011 (Sun)
Mike Fay Live: Climbing Redwood Giants
Time: 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Join J. Michael Fay, National Geographic Society Explorer-in-Residence, for an in-depth look at the giant redwoods of northern California, followed by a screening of the award-winning production EXPLORER: Climbing Redwood Giants.

Photo by Mark Christmas, courtesy National Geographic Society

A former Missouri Botanical Garden researcher and Washington University graduate, Fay is returning to St. Louis to raise awareness and inspire action during the Garden’s year-long celebration of the U.N. International Year of Forests.

Location: Missouri Botanical Garden Shoenberg Theater

FREE Garden & Event Admission on October 23 (WITH REGISTRATION ONLY) for Academy Members and Friends. Space is limited. Register Early!

Register at rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org, or call 314-533-8586.

A partnership presentation of:

 
Oct 25th, 2011 (Tue)
Changes in Memory & Cognition with Normal Aging & Beyond
Time: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Lauren Schwarz, Ph.D., ABPP-CN, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Director of Neuropsychology Division, Department of Neurology & Psychiatry, Saint Louis University

Lapses in memory and word finding difficulties are common complaints as we age. How do we know when we should be concerned about these slips in our abilities? Saint Louis University neuropsychologist, Dr. Lauren Schwarz, discusses the common cognitive changes that occur with aging and pays particular attention to how to differentiate between normal aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and dementia. Don’t forget to mark your calendar for this in-depth look at memory and aging.

To be held at:
Forest Park OASIS - Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor's Center
5595 Grand Drive, St. Louis, MO 63112

FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited.

REGISTRATION CLOSED. Currently accepting wait list ONLY reservations.

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Nov 2nd, 2011 (Wed)
Left Out in the Cold: The Story of the Barrow Global Climate Change Research Lab in Barrow, Alaska
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Janet Baum, AIA, Trustee, Academy of Science – St. Louis; retired founding partner of Health, Education + Research Associates, Inc.,; lead programmer and planner, Barrow Global Climate Change Research Lab

The Inupiat Native Americans (Eskimos) have continuously inhabited the North Slope of Alaska for 10,000 years. Just a few summers ago, the permanent Arctic sea ice pack was only a few hundred yards off the coastline of Alaska. Now it lies over one hundred miles away, and the gap is increasing. For the Inupiat, traversing this gap for subsistence hunting in sealskin canoes poses great risk.

Looking to find a way to provide steady occupations and income for their people (without resorting to oil drilling), the Inupiat commissioned the building of the Barrow, Alaska laboratory to study climate change. Through this, the Inupiat tribe is working to ensure their survival and preserve the Arctic landscape upon which they depend.

The project lead programmer and planner on this project, retired HERA founding partner Janet Baum, tells the remarkable story of place, people and environmental preservation in Left Out in the Cold.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Science Seminar Series is Co-sponsored by:

 
Nov 3rd, 2011 (Thu)
Giants in American Conservation
Time: 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Whitney and Anna Harris Conservation Forum A Conservation Science public forum partnership of the Academy of Science – St. Louis, the University of Missouri – St. Louis Whitney R. Harris World Ecology Center, the Saint Louis Zoo and the Missouri Botanical Garden.

--featuring David Sibley, Susan Flader and Maril Hazlett

SESSION ONE: 6 - 7 PM
Field Guides and Nature in the 21st Century

Featured Speaker: David Allen Sibley

David Sibley is an ornithologist and author of The Sibley Guide to Birds, considered by many to be the most comprehensive guide for North American field identification. He is also the author of: Sibley's Birding Basics: The Sibley Guide to Bird Life and Behavior, The Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Eastern North America, The Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Western North America, Hawks in Flight and The Sibley Guide to Trees. Photo: John James Audubon

Refreshments, Book Signing and Exhibit Viewing from 7 – 7:40 PM
Books by David Allen Sibley available for purchase and signing.

SESSION TWO: 7:40 - 8:45 PM
Whither Missouri? Aldo Leopold's Challenge
Featured Speaker: Susan Flader, Ph.D.

Susan Flader is professor emerita of history at the University of Missouri-Columbia, where she has taught American and world environmental history and the history of Missouri and the American West. She has published several books including Thinking Like a Mountain and The River of the Mother of God on the career and thinking of Aldo Leopold, as well as Exploring Missouri’s Legacy: State Parks and Historic Sites.
Photo: Aldo Leopold


Recovering Carson's Conservationist Side
Featured Speaker: Maril Hazlett, Ph.D.

Maril Hazlett has worked extensively in the fields of environmental advocacy and environmental policy, most recently for the Climate and Energy Project of The Land Institute. She specializes in renewable energy, clean air, and clean water issues. She earned her undergraduate degree from Amherst College and her Ph.D. in environmental history from the University of Kansas, writing her dissertation on reactions to Rachel Carson's Silent Spring.
Photo: Rachel L. Carson

PANEL DISCUSSION: 8:45 - 9 PM

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend.

Registration Required: Call 314-516-6203, or email hintonpa@umsl.edu

Partnering organizations:

 
Nov 4th, 2011 (Fri)
Forest Park Adventure - Part II
Time: 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

4:00 pm - 5:00 p.m.
Geocaching is often described as a "game of high-tech hide and seek", sharing many aspects with orienteering and treasure-hunting! There are geocaches on every continent, from Antarctica to North America.

Join us as we divide into groups in the hunt for the Forest Park treasure! GPS will be provided for use during this event. Every student will take home a treasure!

Followed by:

5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Owl Prowl
Led by Academy of Science - BioBlitz Citizen Scientist Awardee, Mark Glenshaw, students will be forever on the lookout for the Great Horned Owl in your own backyard!

Glenshaw has closely observed and documented a mated pair of Great Horned Owls in Forest Park for more than five years. Find out where the owls "hid" during some of the great St. Louis storms! Wear sneakers or hiking boots as we follow the Forest Park Owl Trail. His work has been featured in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis Magazine and Show-Me Missouri. Read more--Forest Park Owls

Photo Credit: Mark Glenshaw

OPEN TO JUNIOR ACADEMY STUDENTS

Space limited - RSVP by Nov 1st

RSVP to peggyn@academyofsciencestl.org
Please RSVP by November 2nd - thank you

 
Nov 5th, 2011 (Sat)
Honeysuckle Removal Project
Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

It's that time of year again. Junior Academy students continue their environmental stewardship and join over 100 volunteers in the honeysuckle clean up at Forest Park.

Honeysuckle is a non-native, invasive plant species that is detrimental to native plants and shrubs. This project is a partnership with the Forest Park Forever and Kennedy Woods Advisory Group, a group of committed volunteers that have worked tirelessly to eradicate honeysuckle and establish native landscapes in Forest Park since 1999.

Students - check with your teachers - many are offering extra credit as part of your community service!

Open to Junior Academy Students.
Students under the age of 18 must have parental/adult supervision at all times.

See Forest Park Forever website for map and details http://www.forestparkforever.org/2011/10/18/2011-honeysuckle-removal-project/

To sign up to volunteer, please RSVP to peggyn@academyofsciencestl.org

 
Nov 5th, 2011 (Sat)
Community Action Fair
Time: 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Connect with economic empowerment organizations around the metro area, including Jobs with Justice, Neighborhood Houses, Beyond Housing, and Provident Development. Activities and sessions will be held throughout the afternoon.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Activities are throughout the Museum
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Economics Series - Class: The Great Divide co-sponsored by:

 
Nov 8th, 2011 (Tue)
Biodiversity Conservation in Armenia
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Aram Aghasyan, PhD, Senior Scientist, Academy of Sciences, and Head of Protected Areas, Ministry of Nature Protection, Armenia

Photo: Aram and Levon Aghasyan

Armenia is one of six countries comprising the Caucasus Biodiversity Hotspot—considered one of the world’s 25 most diverse and endangered regions. Approximately the size of the State of Maryland, Armenia boasts a tremendous diversity of plants and animals found nowhere else in the world. Dr. Aram Aghasyan and his son, Levon present an overview of what Armenia is doing to conserve the country’s rich biodiversity of wildlife and wild places.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations is Co-sponsored by:

 
Nov 10th, 2011 (Thu)
The Bright News About Lighting: LED the Wave of the Future
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Featured Speaker: Gavin Perry, Ph.D., Director for St. Louis Metro, Show Me Solar

LED lighting is an important energy savings addition to any building’s lighting system. The technology is rapidly improving and provides potential advantages beyond energy conservation. Explore LED lighting technology and how it can improve your health as well as your pocketbook.

To be held at
Forest Park OASIS – Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor’s Center
5595 Grand Drive, St. Louis, MO 63112

OPEN to ALL. COST is $10 per person. REGISTRATION REQUIRED. Call 314-533-8586 or email rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org. Space is limited.

Green Energy Series co-sponsors:

and

 
Nov 10th, 2011 (Thu)
Talking to Ourselves: Self Knowledge and Self Control
Time: 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

-- lecture and book signing, The Moral Psychology Handbook

Featured Speaker: John M. Doris, Ph.D., Professor, Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology Program and Department of Philosophy, Washington University in St. Louis; and author, along with The Moral Psychology Research Group of, The Moral Psychology Handbook

Washington University professor and philosopher, Dr. John Doris, works at the intersection of psychology and philosophical ethics in pursuit of the answers to how and why we make moral choices. What does the science say about the human psychology of moral behavior? Can the philosophical theories be empirically substantiated? How well supported are these claims? Join us for a fascinating look at Moral Psychology-- a burgeoning and flourishing cross-disciplinary field of inquiry into how we are human.

To be held at:
Mid-County Library
7821 Maryland Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63105

FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited.

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Nov 15th, 2011 (Tue)
A Look Back at the St. Louis Blizzard of ‘82
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Charles E. Graves, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Saint Louis University

It was a 1 in 70 year snow event-- the heavy snowfall in January of 1982, and infamous in the St. Louis region. Thousands of motorists were stranded, the airport, Amtrak and bus service were shut down, and scores of schools and businesses were closed for up to a week after the snow ended. Blanketing the area in 13 inches of snow, it was the most on record for any storm since 1912. Dr. Charles Graves takes a look back at the infamous Blizzard of ’82. Why was the snowfall so prolific? Have we seen anything close to that event in recent history? And will we again?

To be held at:
Kirkwood OASIS - Kirkwood Community Center
111 South Geyer Road, St. Louis, MO 63122

FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited.

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Nov 17th, 2011 (Thu)
The Business of Environmental Change in the Corporate World
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

CANCELED - Please check calendar for other upcoming science events

Featured Speaker: Charles Kuehl, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Management Emeritus, College of Business Administration, University of Missouri – St. Louis

You often hear, “If it’s good for the environment, it will cost jobs and weaken the economy.” What’s the real story behind clean energy technology as it pertains to the world of business? Join Dr. Charles Kuehl as he addresses the current situation and different perspectives on surrounding issues, how corporations view sustainability initiatives, and entrepreneurial responses to environmental problems. Come prepared to engage in discussion!

To be held at
Forest Park OASIS – Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor’s Center
5595 Grand Drive, St. Louis, MO 63112

OPEN to ALL. COST is $10 per person. REGISTRATION REQUIRED. Call 314-533-8586 or email rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org. Space is limited.

Green Energy Series co-sponsors:

and

 
Nov 17th, 2011 (Thu)
Green Energy Technologies: Solar and Beyond
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speakers:
Aur Beck, founder, Advanced Energy Solutions Group, Inc.; Chief Technician, RE Install Network; certified trainer NABCET (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners) and
Jim Jordan, Senior Coordinator Continuing Education, University of Missouri – St. Louis; Director for Education Outreach, Show Me Solar

Clean or Green Energy is here to stay! A lot of press has been devoted to solar photo voltaics and wind power/turbines in the last couple of years for homeowners, businesses, and utility companies. Come and hear what types of renewable energy applications are feasible and economical today and what lies ahead on the horizon. Sustainability principles as they apply to green energy and conservation will also be discussed. Don’t be left in the dark. Let the sunbeams shine and reenergize your life.

Location: Belleville East High School Performing Arts Center, 2555 West Boulevard, Belleville, IL 62221

Parking is FREE in school lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

NABT Biology Club Series co-sponsors:

 
Dec 1st, 2011 (Thu)
Squeaks and Scents: Towards the Neurobiology of Animal Social Communication
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Speaker: Featured Speaker: Timothy E. Holy, Ph.D., 2009 Outstanding St. Louis Scientist Innovation Award recipient, Academy of Science – St. Louis; Associate Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine

Communication—whether spoken with words, signed with gestures, written on paper, or sent via email—is perhaps humanity's greatest asset, the ability that underlies our culture and technology. While exceptionally refined in humans, communication is also common among animals: it allows them to organize and tackle challenges too daunting for an individual, or to find each other when it is time to reproduce. In attempting to understand animal communication, we are confronted by fundamental questions: What are the signals? What do they convey? How are they produced? And—perhaps the greatest mystery of all—how does the brain interpret these signals and use them to guide behavior?

Some scientists hope that studies of social communication in animals may lead to a better appreciation of the natural world and of the brain itself. Washington University neurobiologist, Dr. Timothy Holy gives us the inside scoop on the neurobiology of animal social communication, with an emphasis on two examples of communication among mice: chemical signals often called pheromones, and “courtship songs” sung at frequencies too high to be detected by human ears.

STUDENT OPPORTUNITES TO COMPETE FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS— two $250 scholarships for middle and high school students. Attend 3 - 4 seminars or panel discussions and write about your experience. Scholarship decisions announced in May 2011.

DRAWINGS FOR TWO FREE JUNIOR SCIENCE ACADEMY MEMBERSHIPS at each Pioneering Science Seminar. Junior Academy of Science-- Real-world science opportunities and field trips monthly— for students of all abilities in grades 6 - 12.

Location: Kirkwood High School Keating Theater, 801 West Essex,
Kirkwood, MO 63122
FREE parking in Kirkwood High School lots.

FREE and OPEN to ALL—middle and high school students, teachers, adults and the general public. Registration not required.

Pioneering Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Dec 6th, 2011 (Tue)
Solar Thermal and Cooling Technologies
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Featured Speaker: Gavin Perry, Ph.D., Director for St. Louis Metro, Show Me Solar

We hear a lot about solar electric (PV) systems these days, but solar thermal is a much older technology dating back to prehistoric times. Learn about solar heating and cooling applications and how using the sun for heating may be cost effective in many places in the U.S. Explore the technologies involved in solar hot water, passive and active solar heating and solar air conditioning.

To be held at
Forest Park OASIS – Dennis and Judith Jones Visitor’s Center
5595 Grand Drive, St. Louis, MO 63112

OPEN to ALL. COST is $10 per person. REGISTRATION REQUIRED. Call 314-533-8586 or email rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org. Space is limited.

Green Energy Series co-sponsors:

and

 
Dec 6th, 2011 (Tue)
Conservation Medicine: What It Is, Why Care, and How It Can Help with the Survival of Species
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Sharon L. Deem, DVM, Ph.D., Dipl ACZM, Veterinary Epidemiologist, Saint Louis Zoo, Wildcare Institute

Diseases that threaten the long-term survival of wildlife species and/or public health are increasingly recognized as challenges to the stability of the global economy. Many of these diseases are commonly known household names and include diseases such as West Nile virus, avian influenza, Lyme’s disease, SARS, Ebola virus, Monkey pox, white nose syndrome of bats, and chytridiomycosis in amphibians. During the past two decades, a new conservation and health care approach— Conservation Medicine—was developed with the aim to better understand and ensure the health of animals, humans, and ecosystems in a changing world. Veterinary Epidemiologist, Dr. Sharon Deem, tells why this holistic approach—Conservation Medicine—is imperative for endangered species’ conservation and public health. Based on information from various studies, including those conducted by staff at the Saint Louis Zoo, Dr. Deem presents the disease challenges to the conservation of species and gives examples of efforts to minimize the negative impacts associated with emerging infectious (and non-infectious) diseases; and she shares photos and stories on species’ survival from the caves of Missouri to the world’s oceans and elephants in Asia and Africa.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Conservation Conversations is Co-sponsored by:

 
Dec 7th, 2011 (Wed)
Blowin' in the Wind? A Wind Energy Systems Overview
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Featured Speaker: David Peters, Ph.D., Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, McDonnell Douglas Professor of Engineering, Department of Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis

If American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan had written his 1960s anti-war anthem “Blowin’ in the Wind” today, he might have written the iconic lyrics to ask if the answer to our energy woes might be “blowin’ in the wind.” From the simple Buddhist prayer wheels of the fifth century C.E. down to 7 Megawatt machines now operating in Europe, Washington University Engineering Professor, Dr. David Peters follows the history of the development of wind turbines and introduces the subject of wind energy systems in the context of their use as a national renewable energy source. He looks at world energy needs, various alternative energy sources, and the role that wind energy could play towards a sustainable energy program. He covers the taxonomy of wind turbines, the various component parts, and how energy is actually extracted from the air, and discusses environmental concerns associated with wind energy in this fascinating look at the growing use of and burgeoning interest in wind as a viable source of alternative renewable energy.

Location: Saint Louis Zoo Living World Auditorium. Parking is FREE in the Zoo North Lot.

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Adults, teachers, middle and high school students, and the general public are invited to attend these no-cost lectures on topical issues in science. For more information call 314-646-4544 or 314-533-8586. Registration not required.

Science Seminar Series is Co-sponsored by:

 
Dec 9th, 2011 (Fri)
Monster in the Hollow: The Story of Missouri’s Ozark Dinosaur
Time: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Featured Speaker: Michael Fix, Associate Teaching Professor of Geology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri – St. Louis

Join Missouri Ozark Dinosaur Project geologist, Michael Fix, as he explores the Chronister Site-- Missouri's only known dinosaur find, from the accidental discovery of dinosaur fossils there in the 1940's to the eventual scientific excavations many decades later, and the major fossil discoveries that resulted from those early stumbled-upon bones. You’ll be transported back to the late Cretaceous period some 75 million years ago when dinosaurs and other prehistoric monsters roamed our state.

To be held at:
OASIS at the Center of Clayton
50 Gay Avenue, Clayton, MO 63105

FREE to the first 10 registrants, $9 per person thereafter. OPEN to ALL. Space is limited.

To register call 314-533-8586 or e-mail rsvp@academyofsciencestl.org

On Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Dec 13th, 2011 (Tue)
Missouri's Ice Age Megafauna: St. Louis Area Big Bones
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

--lecture and book signing

Featured Speaker: Bruce Stinchcomb, Ph.D., paleontologist, retired Professor of Geology, St. Louis Community College - Florissant Valley, and author of, Cenozoic Fossils II: The Neogene

There’s a rich history of discovery and interpretation of the prehistoric animals that lived in Missouri and throughout the St. Louis region during the Pleistocene Era—and big bones are intimately entwined with the history of the Mound City. Join paleontologist Dr. Bruce Stinchcomb for a look back at St. Louis and Missouri’s Ice Age Megafauna.

Woodcut image of the human tracks which existed in ledges along the Mississippi near Jefferson Barracks. This track caused a great deal of scientific interest in both the U.S. and Europe in the early 19th century for two reasons.

1. The ages of limestone (and sandstone) beds in the area were not known--it was considered reasonable that man may have been contemporaneous to when they were deposited and that the track was really that of a human.
2. The St. Louis area (later the Koch mastodon site) was becoming an area where large bones were being found and these were debated as to their being from extinct animals. The concept of both geologic time and organismic extinction were hot topics in the science of the early 19th century.

-- Image courtesy of Bruce Stinchcomb, Ph.D.

Cenozoic Fossils II: The Neogene, available for purchase and signing by the author following the talk.

To be held at: Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium
Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park
St. Louis, Missouri 63112

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome.
Parking free in Museum lots or in Forest Park.

Presented in conjunction with the traveling exhibition, Mammoths and Mastodons: Titans of the Ice Age, on display at the Missouri History Museum, November 25, 2011 - April 15, 2012.

 

2010 Events

Jan 9th, 2010 (Sat)
Regal Eagles
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

CANCELLED DUE TO SEVERE WEATHER

HERE'S A LINK TO PUBLIC EAGLE WATCHING ACTIVITIES THAT YOU MAY CHOOSE TO ATTEND ON YOUR OWN LATER THIS MONTH:

http://www.greatriverroad.com/Eagles/eagleCover.htm

The American Bald Eagle became our national emblem in 1782. Discover the adaptions that make these magnificent birds so special. Learn how these birds became endangered in Missouri and how their populations have made a tremendous comeback. Be prepared to venture outside to search for migratory and resident bald eagles that can be found at Columbia Bottom. We will also visit the Confluence and see an active eagle's nest!

 
Jan 14th, 2010 (Thu)
Is it Hot in Here? Climate Change Panel Discussion
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Featured Topics and Panelists:

Leading Green Cities and Jobs
Sarah Coffin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Public Policy Studies, College of Education and Public Service, Saint Louis University

In 2005 the U.S. Conference of Mayors developed the Climate Protection Agreement, with cities that signed on agreeing to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 7% below their 1990 levels by the year 2012. In 2007, the Conference surveyed Mayors from the 134 participating cities (of which St. Louis was one); and their findings suggest important job opportunities for the future. That future is tied to trends like renewable energy, eco-industrial parks, green technology, green building, recycling, and ideas we have yet to discover.

Climate Change in a Biodiversity Hotspot
Ellen Damschen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis

A changing climate is profoundly impacting plants and animals across the globe. Washington University ecologist, Ellen Damschen, shares how climate change has affected plants in a global biodiversity hotspot, the Klamath-Siskiyou Mountains in Oregon and talks about the 50-year-old data set that helped her determine how plants have changed because of climatic warming.

Climate Changes, Stock Prices and Other Random Processes: Should We Bet on the Trend ?
William Dannevik, Ph.D., Professor of Meteorology and Chair, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Saint Louis University

Climate varies naturally on many different time scales — from years to millennia — regardless of whether greenhouse gases are added to the atmosphere. Scientists use climate simulation models to help detect systematic climate changes and to explore the likely causes of such variations. But... how reliable can we expect such models to be?

The Heat is On: The Truth about Global Climate Change
Mark Hildebrandt, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Geography, Southern Illinois University - Edwardsville

Climate change is likely to cause altered precipitation and temperature regimes around the world, including the United States and in the St. Louis metropolitan region. The impacts will affect most every facet of our lives, from food availability, energy consumption and demands on infrastructure, to our educational expectations and employment opportunities.

DRAWINGS for TWO FREE JUNIOR SCIENCE ACADEMY MEMBERSHIPS at each Seminar.

STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES TO COMPETE FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS - one $250 Middle School Student Scholarship and one $250 High School Student Scholarship. Attend 3 of the 5 seminars or panel discussions and write about your experience. Scholarship decisions announced in May 2010!

To be held at Kirkwood High School Keating Theater, 801 W. Essex, Kirkwood, MO 63122

Parking free in the high school lot.

This event is free and open to middle and high school students, teachers, adults, and the general public.

Pioneering Science Series co-sponsor:

 
Jan 18th, 2010 (Mon)
Grandmaster Chess
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

The game of chess is over 1,500 years old and played around the world. Come to the site of the U.S. Chess Championships to explore the strategy and history of chess with a nationally-ranked Grandmaster!

No Chess experience necessary!

Prizes!

RSVP by January 15, 2010 to: peggyw@academyofsciencestl.org

Details and parking directions will be e-mailed back to you.

Free and open to Junior Academy students. Parents welcome!

Earn 25 achievement points!