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The Simplest Atom Offers a Check on the Big Bang

Wednesday, February 18, 2009 @ 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

John S. Rigden, Ph.D., 2008 Outstanding Scientist Educator Award recipient, Academy of Science – St. Louis; Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Physical Society; Honorary Professor of Physics, Washington University in St. Louis

False color image of the star AE Aurigae. The star’s carbon-rich dust grains may be hiding deuterium, a tracer of star and galaxy evolution. Credit: T.A. Rector and B.A. Wolpa, NOAO, and NSF.

It is currently thought that the universe began around 14½ billion years ago with a bang – a Big Bang. This belief, of course, raises tantalizing questions; but it’s also supported by persuasive evidence. One piece of evidence comes with the water we drink and the simplest of all atoms, heavy hydrogen, also known as deuterium. With a salute to human ingenuity and a tip of the hat to lady luck, author and nationally know physicist, Dr. John Rigden, discusses how physicists have discovered a way to use deuterium as a check on the validity of the Big Bang hypothesis. We shall see how this happened in this fascinating peek at how the simple informs the complex.

Book signing, Hydrogen: The Essential Element, with author, John Rigden, following talk.

False color image of the star AE Aurigae. The star’s carbon-rich dust grains may be hiding deuterium, a tracer of star and galaxy evolution. Credit: T.A. Rector and B.A. Wolpa, NOAO, and NSF.

All Seminars are held in The Living World (north side of Zoo)
Parking FREE in Zoo North Lot.

FREE & OPEN to ALL.

For more information call 314-533-8586 or email mbauer@academyofsciencestl.org

Science Seminar Series Co-sponsored by:

Details

Date:
Wednesday, February 18, 2009
Time:
7:30 PM-9:00 PM