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October 2019

Dragons Down Under: Adventures in Species Discovery and Conservation of Australian Lizards

Tuesday, October 8, 2019 @ 7:00 PM-8:30 PM
Saint Louis Zoo, 1 Government Drive
St. Louis, MO 63110 United States

Free and OPEN to ALL. Junior Academy members and middle and high school students are welcome and encouraged to attend. Reservations not required. Parking is free in the Zoo North lot or on the street in Forest Park.

Featured speaker: Jane Melville, Ph.D., Senior Curator, Herpetology, Museums Victoria, Australia

An evolutionary and conservation biologist, Jane Melville has studied dragon lizards across the vast, hot, and dry continent of Australia for the last 20 years, naming 30 new species. The dragons are some of the world’s most iconic and best-known lizards. Dr. Melville shares her admiration for these unique animals. Using spectacular images gathered for her recent book, Dragon Lizards of Australia, she presents the most recent understanding of their diversity, ecology and conservation.

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Jungle Giants: Protecting Endangered Species in The Wildest Places on Earth

Wednesday, October 9, 2019 @ 7:00 PM-8:30 PM
Saint Louis Zoo, 1 Government Drive
St. Louis, MO 63110 United States

Free and OPEN to ALL. Junior Academy members and middle and high school students are welcome and encouraged to attend. Reservations not required. Parking is free in the Zoo North lot or on the street in Forest Park.

— multimedia presentation and book signing

Featured Speaker: Paul Rosolie is a naturalist, explorer, author, and award-winning wildlife filmmaker. For the past decade he has specialized in threatened ecosystems and species in countries like Indonesia, Brazil, India, and Peru. As an author, Paul’s mission is to explore the relationship between humans and nature, wild animals, and our vanishing wild places. Rosolie’s memoir on Amazonian wildlife and exploration, Mother of God: An Extraordinary Journey into the Uncharted Tributaries of the Western Amazon, was hailed as “gripping” by Jane Goodall, and the Wall Street Journal applauded Rosolie’s environmental call-to-arms for its “rare immediacy and depth.” His conservation writing has appeared in National Geographic, The Huffington Post and The Guardian. In 2013, Rosolie spoke at the United Nations global Forum on Forests while accepting an award for his Amazonian wildlife short-film An Unseen World. His 2019 debut novel, The Girl and the Tiger, examines the complex modern realities of endangered tigers and elephants in a gripping classic style adventure, based on a true story.

In this timely and fascinating multimedia event, Rosolie discusses the real life conservation threats facing tigers and elephants, and how literature can influence public consciousness towards conservation.

Books available for purchase and signing by the author following the presentation.

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Simple Gifts Flower Farm: Tour and Flower Picking

Monday, October 14, 2019 @ 1:30 PM-3:00 PM
Simple Gifts Flower Farm, 2115 Freeburg Avenue
Belleville, Illinois 62220 United States

Parking is across the street in the Belleville City Sanitation lot at 2115 Freeburg Avenue, Belleville, IL, 62220

COST: $10 per person | $5 per child for children 13 and under

ALL AGES WELCOME! Space is limited. Registration required. Click FInd Out More to register!

Featured Speaker and Tour Guide: Meghan DeGroot is a farmer, a teacher, and the owner and operator of Simple Gifts Flower Farm. She has been a longtime supporter of sustainable farming and the “slow food” and “slow flower” movements. After training with Southern Illinois Food Works and Floret Flower Farm, she is in her third season of cut flower production.

Join us for an afternoon of picking flowers and learning about science on the farm! Feed Weeko the once wild Mustang horse, throw the ducks a tomato, meet Buck and Winston the livestock guardian dogs, and learn how farm and nature work together to create a field of beautiful flowers.

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Science Distilled STL: Roots & Brews—The Many Roles of Microbes in Our World

Monday, October 14, 2019 @ 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
Urban Chestnut Grove Brewery and Bierhall, 4465 Manchester Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63110 United States

Registration not required. FREE. Open to the public. All ages welcome! Free parking Urban Chestnut east side lot, or street.

Two short talks on science, trivia in the middle, prizes at the end, and soft drinks, beer, and food available for purchase the whole time!

Featured Speakers:

Rhiannon Vargas, graduate student, Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis

Kurt Driesner, Quality Assurance Manager, Urban Chestnut Brewing Company

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The Social Lives of Microbes

Monday, October 21, 2019 @ 7:00 PM-8:30 PM
St. Louis County Library – Natural Bridge Branch, 7606 Natural Bridge Road
St. Louis, MO 63121-4905 United States

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Junior Academy members, middle and high school students welcome and encouraged to attend. Space is limited. Registration required. Click Find Out More to Register!

Featured Speaker: Fredrik Inglis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology, Department of Biology, and Principal Investigator, Inglis Lab, University of Missouri – St. Louis

Microbes are social animals. Although single-celled and seemingly not very complex, they have incredibly busy social lives. They talk with each other using chemical signals, perform collective behaviors to move and acquire nutrients, and even engage in toxic warfare. But how and why do these complex interactions evolve in such simple organisms? The research in my lab seeks to better understand the evolution of these interactions and the consequences they have on infection and resistance to antibiotics.

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Monkey Mystery: How Comparative Anatomy Can Bring Fossil Primates to Life

Tuesday, October 22, 2019 @ 6:30 PM-8:30 PM
St. Charles County Library – Spencer Road Branch, 427 Spencer Road
St. Peters, MO 63376 United States

Important information on parking and exact cafe location sent with registration confirmation.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED. FREE and OPEN to Junior Academy of Science members and all middle and high school students in grades 6-12 from throughout the region. PRE-REGISTRATION for Junior Academy members ONLY thru Friday, October 18. General registration opens Saturday, October 19. Click Find Out More to Register!

To join the Junior Academy of Science, or to find out more about the benefits of membership in the Junior Academy, click here.

PROGRAM
6:30 pm – 7:00 pm: Dinner and Icebreaker
7:00 pm – 8:30 pm: Presentation & Activities

Featured Cafe Presenter: Kari Allen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological Anthropology & Neuroscience, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine

What did the first primates eat? How big were they? Did they live in the trees or on the ground? In this interactive teen cafe on comparative anatomy, you’ll work in teams to explore the anatomy of your team’s mystery monkey and predict the answers to these questions. And you can put your artistic skills to work—each team will draw their monkey and choose a name for their newly discovered species of primate.

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Space on Tap

Thursday, October 24, 2019 @ 7:00 PM-8:30 PM
4204 Main Street Brewing Co. Tap Room, 6435 W. Main Street
Belleville, IL 62223 United States

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Junior Academy members, middle and high school students welcome and encouraged to attend. Space is limited. Click Find Out More to Register!

Two short talks on science, trivia in the middle, and soft drinks, beer, and food available for purchase the whole time!

Featured Topics and Speakers:

Mapping Many Million Rocks: Site Selection with OSIRIS-REx at Bennu
Speaker:
Pamela Gay, Ph.D., American astronomer, educator, podcaster, and writer; Senior Education and Communication Specialist and Senior Scientist, Planetary Science Institute; co-host, Astronomy Cast; 2012 Outstanding St. Louis Science Educator, The Academy of Science – St. Louis

Cold Origins: NASA’s Stardust Mission To *And From!* Comet Wild 2
Speaker: Ryan Ogliore, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics, Department of Physics, Washington University in St. Louis

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November 2019

How to Tame a Fox and Build a Dog

Monday, November 4, 2019 @ 7:00 PM-8:30 PM
Saint Louis Zoo, 1 Government Drive
St. Louis, MO 63110 United States

—a Conservation Conversation lecture and book signing

Free and OPEN to ALL. Junior Academy members and middle and high school students are welcome and encouraged to attend. Reservations not required. Parking is free in the Zoo North lot or on the street in Forest Park.

Featured Speakers and Co-authors of, How to Tame a Fox and Build a Dog: Visionary Scientists and a Siberian Tale of Jump-Started Evolution:
Lee Alan Dugatkin, Ph.D., Distinguished University Scholar and Professor of Biology, University of Louisville
and
Lyudmila Trut, Ph.D., Lead Scientist, Silver Fox Domestication Research Group, and Professor of Evolutionary Genetics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk

What defines a dog? For the last six decades, a dedicated team of researchers in Siberia have been domesticating silver foxes to replay the evolution of the dog in real time. It’s the longest running experiment in animal behavior. Together, evolutionary biologist and science historian, Lee Dugatkin, along with Lyudmila Trut, the project’s lead scientist since 1959, tell the story of the science, politics, adventure, and love behind one of the most astonishing experiments in breeding ever undertaken — the speeding up of thousands of years of evolution into a few decades in order to witness the process of domestication.

Books available for purchase and signing by the authors following the presentation.

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Alaska: People and Place in an Age of Climate Change

Wednesday, November 6, 2019 @ 7:00 PM-8:30 PM
Saint Louis Zoo, 1 Government Drive
St. Louis, MO 63110 United States

Free and OPEN to ALL. Junior Academy members and middle and high school students are welcome and encouraged to attend. Reservations not required. Parking is free in the Zoo North lot or on the street in Forest Park.

— stories, music, and book signing with Kim Heacox

awl_logo_new_blue-copy Special thanks to program sponsor, the Alaska Wilderness League.

Featured Speaker: Kim Heacox, American writer, photographer, and musician

Join us for an evening with author, photographer, and musician, Kim Heacox, as he weaves together story, humor and music to capture the wild beauty of Alaska, the importance of community, and the urgency of climate change. Kim is the author of more than a dozen books, including the acclaimed memoir, The Only Kayak (2005), and the novel, Jimmy Bluefeather (2015), the only work of fiction to ever win the National Outdoor Book Award

Books available for purchase and signing by the author following the presentation.

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Astronomy on Tap

Monday, November 11, 2019 @ 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
Urban Chestnut Grove Brewery and Bierhall, 4465 Manchester Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63110 United States

Registration not required. FREE. Open to the public. All ages welcome! Free parking Urban Chestnut east side lot, or street.

Two short talks on science, trivia in the middle, prizes at the end, and soft drinks, beer, and food available for purchase the whole time!

Featured Topics and Speakers:

See the Universe like Superman—Building the X-ray Telescopes of Tomorrow

Speaker: Manel Errando, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics, Department of Physics, Washington University in St. Louis

Black Holes and Neutron Stars at Their Extremes: 20 Years of Chandra X-ray Observatory Discoveries

Speaker: Mike Nowak, Ph.D., Research Professor of Physics, Department of Physics, Washington University in St. Louis

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Invasive Species Solutions: When Science, Policy, and Stewardship Converge

Thursday, November 14, 2019 @ 6:00 PM-8:00 PM
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63110 United States

A Wild Ideas Worth Sharing Speaker Series Event

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Registration is Required. Register by Thursday, November 7. Junior Academy members, middle and high school students are welcome and encouraged to attend. CLICK Find Out More to Register.

PROGRAM
6:00 p.m. Check-in and Networking | Hors d’oeuvres/Cash Bar
6:45 p.m. Formal Presentations

Invited field experts share the science of invasion biology, the urgent need to manage existing and emerging invasive species, the role citizens can play in changing policy to preserve biodiversity, and how sustained stewardship can restore and heal landscapes and whole communities.

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Teen Science Cafe—Combating Cancer: Using Stem Cells to Explore Treatments for Leukemia

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 @ 6:30 PM-8:30 PM
Saint Louis Community College at BRDG Park, 1005 North Warson Road
St. Louis, MO 63132 United States

REGISTRATION REQUIRED. FREE and OPEN to Junior Academy of Science members and all middle and high school students in grades 6-12 from throughout the region. PRE-REGISTRATION for Junior Academy members ONLY thru Friday, November 15. General registration opens Saturday, November 16. Click Find Out More/Event Information to register!

To join the Junior Academy of Science, or to find out more about the benefits of membership in the Junior Academy, click here.

PROGRAM
6:30 pm – 7:00 pm: Dinner and Icebreaker
7:00 pm – 8:30 pm: Presentation & Activities

Featured Cafe Presenter: John F. DiPersio, M.D., Ph.D., Deputy Director, Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center; Virginia E. and Samuel J. Golman Endowed Professor of Oncology; and Chief, Division of Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis

Leukemia is a disease that affects adults and children; it is the most common cancer in children and teens, accounting for almost 1 out of 3 cancers. Oncologist, Dr. John DiPersio’s research focuses on using blood stem cells for transplantation and genetic interventions to fight leukemia. This can include gene editing of T cells, one type of immune system cell. Learn how immunotherapy can make cancer treatment more effective. In this interactive Teen Cafe on fighting cancer, you’ll role play, research, argue, and defend your position in one of two medical ethics scenarios 1) around the use of HeLa cells, or 2) the use of aggressive clinical interventions in advanced cancer care treatment.

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Promoting Health and Social Justice in a Changing Environment

Thursday, November 21, 2019 @ 7:00 PM-8:30 PM
St. Louis County Library – Samuel C. Sachs Branch, 16400 Burkhardt Pl.
Chesterfield, MO 63017-4660 United States

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Junior Academy members, middle and high school students welcome and encouraged to attend. Space is limited. Registration required. Click Find Out More to Register!

Featured Speaker: Christine Ekenga, Ph.D., MPH, Assistant Professor of Public Health, and Faculty Co-Director, Environment and Social Development Initiative, Center for Social Development, Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis

Environmental changes, such as pollution, climate change, and natural and human-caused disasters, affect people worldwide. Environmental change is also a social justice issue. People with less social, economic, and political advantage are more likely to experience the negative effects of environmental change. Dr. Ekenga’s research examines how lifestyle, environmental, and occupational factors interact to influence health and well-being. She discusses local and global examples of environmental injustice in this important and timely talk on the impact of our changing environment on human health.

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December 2019

What Can the Past Tell Us About the Future of Climate Change?

Thursday, December 5, 2019 @ 7:00 PM-8:30 PM
St. Louis County Library – Headquarters, 1640 S Lindbergh Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63131 United States

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Junior Academy members, middle and high school students welcome and encouraged to attend. Space is limited. Registration required. Click Find Out More to Register!

Featured Speaker: Tristam Kidder, Ph.D., Edward S. and Tedi Macias Professor of Anthropology and Chair, Department of Anthropology, Professor of Environmental Studies, Washington University in St. Louis

Climates have changed, are changing, and will change in the future, but today humans are accelerating the pace of these changes. Washington University Anthropology Department Chair and Environmental Studies Professor, Dr. Tristam Kidder, uses archaeological and environmental information from ancient China to show how people in the past responded to climate changes and what these responses can tell us about the challenges we face with changing climates today.

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Science Distilled STL: Germs & Geography—Parasites and the Ways They Shape Our World

Monday, December 9, 2019 @ 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
Urban Chestnut Grove Brewery and Bierhall, 4465 Manchester Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63110 United States

Urban Chestnut Grove Brewery and Bierhall
4465 Manchester Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110 United States + Google Map

Registration not required. FREE. Open to the public. All ages welcome! Free parking Urban Chestnut east side lot, or street.

Two short talks on science, trivia in the middle, prizes at the end, and soft drinks, beer, and food available for purchase the whole time!

Featured Speakers:

When Does the Bird Get the Germ? Demystifying Malaria in Tropical Birds
Speaker: Emma Young, doctoral candidate, Department of Biology, University of Missouri – St. Louis; founder, Science Distilled STL

and

Raccoons and Racism in St. Louis
Speaker: Kelly Lane-deGraaf, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology, Biological and Behavioral Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Fontbonne University

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January 2020

Monday, January 13 @ 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
Urban Chestnut Grove Brewery and Bierhall, 4465 Manchester Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63110 United States

Registration not required. FREE. Open to the public. All ages welcome! Free parking Urban Chestnut east side lot, or street.

Two short talks on science, trivia in the middle, prizes at the end, and soft drinks, beer, and food available for purchase the whole time!

Featured Topics and Speakers:

The Dark Side of Light: Light Pollution and the Insect Apocolypse
Speaker: Brett Seymoure, Ph.D., Grossman Family Postdoctoral Fellow, Living Earth Collaborative, Washington University in St. Louis

Black Holes and Neutron Stars at Their Extremes: 20 Years of Chandra X-ray Observatory Discoveries
Speaker: Erika Gibb, Ph.D., Department Chair, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri – St. Louis

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Who’s to Blame for Fake News? Probably You

Monday, January 27 @ 7:00 PM-8:30 PM
St. Louis County Library – Weber Road Branch, 4444 Weber Road
St. Louis, 63123 United States

FREE and OPEN to ALL. Junior Academy members, middle and high school students welcome and encouraged to attend. Space is limited. Registration required. Click Find Out More to register!

Featured Speaker: Amber Hinsley, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Communication, Saint Louis University

It’s time to move beyond talking about the obvious ways to identify mis- and disinformation by learning why we fall for fake news (and we all do) and how to dissuade others of their fake-news beliefs. The fake news spectrum is wide, and purveyors of misinformation play on our inherent biases to “trick” us into believing half-truths and falsehoods. Join us to learn how to recognize your own biases and find out how to effectively confront others about their misinformed beliefs.

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Immigration Then and Now: Exploring The Making of Undocumented Immigrants

Tuesday, January 28 @ 7:00 PM-8:30 PM
Missouri History Museum, 5700 Lindell Blvd
St. Louis, MO 63112 United States

Registration not required. FREE and OPEN to ALL. Middle and high school students welcome. Parking is free in the History Museum lots, on the street in Forest Park, or in the East and West lots across from the Judith and Dennis Jones Visitor Center.

Featured Speaker: Ariela Schachter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Washington University in St. Louis

Throughout the history of the United States, federal laws and policies have been used to determine who should be allowed to immigrate to the U.S. and who should be excluded. Sociologist, Ariela Schachter, explores how historical and contemporary policies have contributed to current debates and understandings of undocumented immigration.

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February 2020

Science Distilled STL: Spikes and Stripes—The Hidden World of Mosses and Bees

Monday, February 10 @ 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
Urban Chestnut Grove Brewery and Bierhall, 4465 Manchester Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63110 United States

Registration not required. FREE. Open to the public. All ages welcome! Free parking Urban Chestnut east side lot, or street.

Two short talks on science, trivia in the middle, prizes at the end, and soft drinks, beer, and food available for purchase the whole time!

Featured Speakers and Topics:

Mossin’ Around: The Hidden Lives of Tiny Plants
Speaker: Adam Rembert, Restoration Ecology Assistant, Litzsinger Road Ecology Center of the Missouri Botanical Garden

Insect Apocalypse? How Citizens and Scientists are Uniting to Support Bees
Speaker: Nicole Miller-Struttmann, Ph.D., Laurance L. Browning, Jr. Assistant Professor, Biological Science Department, Webster University; 2019 Academy of Science – St. Louis Outstanding St. Louis Science Educator

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The Land of Cinnamon and Gold: 500 Years of Amazon Science and Exploration

Tuesday, February 11 @ 7:00 PM-8:30 PM
Saint Louis Zoo, 1 Government Drive
St. Louis, MO 63110 United States

Featured Speaker: Thomas Lovejoy, Ph.D., Senior Fellow, United Nations Foundation; Professor, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, College of Science, George Mason University

The Amazon is as big as the 48 contiguous United States and represents the greatest terrestrial repository of biodiversity on Earth. The Amazon river system contains 20 percent of all the world’s river water and more species of fish than any other river. It has been inhabited for millennia by very sophisticated indigenous tribes, some of which remain uncontacted. Not surprisingly, the Amazon has drawn the attention of scientists and explorers. Thomas Lovejoy presents the highlights of exploration and science from the 1539-1541 expedition of Francisco de Orellana up to the present day.

The Land of Cinnamon and Gold is a Conservation Conversation of The Academy of Science – St. Louis, the Saint Louis Zoo, and the Living Earth Collaborative Center for Biodiversity. Special thanks to co-sponsors the Whitney R. Harris World Ecology Center at the University of MIssouri-St. Louis, the American Association of University Women, and the Tuesday Women’s Association of The Ethical Society of St. Louis.
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